Science Current Events | Science News | Brightsurf.com
 

First evidence of under-ice volcanic eruption in Antarctica

January 21, 2008

The first evidence of a volcanic eruption from beneath Antarctica's most rapidly changing ice sheet is reported this week in the journal Nature Geosciences. The volcano on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet erupted 2000 years ago (325BC) and remains active.

Using airborne ice-sounding radar, scientists from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) discovered a layer of ash produced by a 'subglacial' volcano. It extends across an area larger than Wales.

Lead author, Hugh Corr of the BAS says, "The discovery of a 'subglacial' volcanic eruption from beneath the Antarctic ice sheet is unique in itself. But our techniques also allow us to put a date on the eruption, determine how powerful it was and map out the area where ash fell. We believe this was the biggest eruption in Antarctica during the last 10,000 years. It blew a substantial hole in the ice sheet, and generated a plume of ash and gas that rose around 12 km into air."

The discovery is another vital piece of evidence that will help determine the future of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and refine predictions of future sea-level rise. Co-author Professor David Vaughan (BAS) says,

"This eruption occurred close to Pine Island Glacier on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The flow of this glacier towards the coast has speeded up in recent decades and it may be possible that heat from the volcano has caused some of that acceleration. However, it cannot explain the more widespread thinning of West Antarctic glaciers that together are contributing nearly 0.2mm per year to sea-level rise. This wider change most probably has its origin in warming ocean waters."

British Antarctic Survey


Related Ice Sheet Current Events and Ice Sheet News Articles


Antarctic study identifies melting ice sheet's role in sea level rise
Loss of ice in Antarctica caused by a warming ocean could raise global sea levels by three metres, research suggests.

Greenland ice sheet releasing 'Mississippi River' worth of phosphorus
Not only is Greenland's melting ice sheet adding huge amounts of water to the oceans, it could also be unleashing 400,000 metric tons of phosphorus every year - as much as the mighty Mississippi River releases into the Gulf of Mexico, according to a new study.

Icy ebb and flow influenced by hydrothermal activity
The last million years of Earth's history was dominated by the cyclic advance and retreat of ice sheets over large swaths of North America. During cold glacial intervals, ice sheets reached as far south as Long Island and Indiana, while during warm interglacial periods the ice rapidly retreated to Greenland.

Syracuse geophysicist questions stability of Antarctic ice sheet
A professor in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences is joining the growing debate over the fate of the world's largest ice sheet, whose sudden melting is sending shockwaves throughout the geophysics community.

New gravity dataset will help unveil the Antarctic continent
More than 50 scientists from research institutions in eight countries, among others Germany, UK, USA and Russia have been actively collaborating since 2003 to make this gravity data compilation possible, coordinated by Mirko Scheinert of Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.

Melting Greenland ice sheet may affect global ocean circulation, future climate
Scientists from the University of South Florida, along with colleagues in Canada and the Netherlands, have determined that the influx of fresh water from the Greenland ice sheet is "freshening" the North Atlantic Ocean and could disrupt the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), an important component of global ocean circulation that could have a global effect.

Study finds high melt rates on Antarctica's most stable ice shelf
A new Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego-led study measured a melt rate that is 25 times higher than expected on one part of the Ross Ice Shelf. The study suggests that high, localized melt rates such as this one on Antarctica's largest and most stable ice shelf are normal and keep Antarctica's ice sheets in balance.

Climate change altering Greenland ice sheet and accelerating sea level rise, says York University professor
The Greenland ice sheet has traditionally been pictured as a bit of a sponge for glacier meltwater, but new research has found it is rapidly losing the ability to buffer its contribution to rising sea levels, says a York University researcher.

Warmer air and sea, declining ice continue to trigger Arctic change
A new NOAA-sponsored report shows that air temperature in 2015 across the Arctic was well above average with temperature anomalies over land more than 2 degrees Fahrenheit above average, the highest since records began in 1900.

East Antarctic Ice Sheet has stayed frozen for 14 million years, Penn team reports
Antarctica was once a balmier place, lush with plants and lakes. Figuring out just how long the continent has been a barren, cold desert of ice can give clues as to how Antarctica responded to the effects of past climates and can perhaps also indicate what to expect there in the future as Earth's atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide grows.
More Ice Sheet Current Events and Ice Sheet News Articles

Glacial Geology: Ice Sheets and Landforms

Glacial Geology: Ice Sheets and Landforms
by Matthew M. Bennett (Editor), Neil F. Glasser (Editor)


The new Second Edition of Glacial Geology provides a modern, comprehensive summary of glacial geology and geomorphology. It is has been thoroughly revised and updated from the original First Edition. This book will appeal to all students interested in the landforms and sediments that make up glacial landscapes. The aim of the book is to outline glacial landforms and sediments and to provide the reader with the tools required to interpret glacial landscapes. It describes how glaciers work and how the processes of glacial erosion and deposition which operate within them are recorded in the glacial landscape. The Second Edition is presented in the same clear and concise format as the First Edition, providing detailed explanations that are not cluttered with unnecessary detail. Additions...

The National Geographic Magazine / March, 2015. The War on Science (The Age of Disbelief); Luminous Life Forms; Syrian Refugees; Greenland Ice Sheet; Berlin-Athens Tension

The National Geographic Magazine / March, 2015. The War on Science (The Age of Disbelief); Luminous Life Forms; Syrian Refugees; Greenland Ice Sheet; Berlin-Athens Tension
by Editor-in-Chief: Susan Goldberg (Editor), n/a (Editor)


New and pristine. Washington, DC: The National Geographic Society, 2015. The February, 2015 issue, Volume 227, No. 3. Quarto, photo-illustrated perfect bound wraps, 132 pp. New; absolutely pristine and immaculate. Includes laid-in subscriber promos, etc.; in sealed protective storage as well. Highest possible grade. See scan. Feature articles: The War on Science (The Age of Disbelief), in which NGS goes after - quite properly - the lunatic fringe groups who espouse the claims on the cover (which see); Luminous Life Forms; Syrian Refugees; Greenland Ice Sheet; Berlin-Athens Tension; and of course all the diverse, engaging departments. L-pr7

Ice Sheets and Late Quaternary Environmental Change

Ice Sheets and Late Quaternary Environmental Change
by Martin J. Siegert (Author)


Ice Sheets and Late Quaternary Environmental Change provides a detailed account of the temporal and spatial distribution of ice sheets during the last ice age, and how these ice masses interacted with the environment. This is the first book in 20 years to detail the sizes of ice sheets during the last glaciation and the first to discuss their role in past climate change.
Arranged in two parts, the first part provides the tools required for evaluating past ice sheets while the second part uses these tools to establish the size, extent and dynamics of late Quaternary ice sheets. Assuming no prior knowledge of Quaternary Science, the discussion progresses from the basic principles of how and why ices ages occur, to the interpretation of proxy records of past climate and ocean...

Glacial Geology: Ice Sheets and Landforms

Glacial Geology: Ice Sheets and Landforms
by Matthew R. Bennett (Author), Neil F. Glasser (Author)


Glacial Geology: Ice Sheets and Landforms provides a modern, comprehensive summary of glacial geology. It is presented in a clear and concise format, which is not cluttered with unnecessary detail. During the Late Cenozoic period much of the northern hemisphere was extensively glaciated. This had a profound effect on the nature of the landscape. In order to understand this landscape one must be able to identify and interpret the glacial landforms and sediments from which it is composed. These landforms and sediments tell a unique part of the story of the Cenozoic Ice Age. This book is about these landforms and sediments and provides the reader with the tools with which to interpret them. It shows how glaciers work and how the processes of glacial erosion and deposition which operate...

The Ice Age

The Ice Age
by Dr. Jürgen Ehlers (Author), Dr. Philip Hughes (Author), Professor Philip L. Gibbard (Author)


This book provides a new look at the climatic history of the last 2.6 million years during the ice age, a time of extreme climatic fluctuations that have not yet ended. This period also coincides with important phases of human development from Neanderthals to modern humans, both of whom existed side by side during the last cold stage of the ice age. The ice age has seen dramatic expansions of glaciers and ice sheets, although this has been interspersed with relatively short warmer intervals like the one we live in today. The book focuses on the changing state of these glaciers and the effects of associated climate changes on a wide variety of environments (including mountains, rivers, deserts, oceans and seas) and also plants and animals. For example, at times the Sahara was green and...

The Greenland Ice Sheet - 80 Years of Climate Change Seen From the Air

The Greenland Ice Sheet - 80 Years of Climate Change Seen From the Air
by Kurt Kjær (Editor)


The decision to re-photograph Greenland from the air was originally motivated by the desire to demonstrate Danish sovereignty over an Arctic region to the international community. A huge collection of aerial photographs resulted from these efforts. This material forms a cornerstone in the technological transformation that revolutionised mapping in the period between the wars. It ensured Denmark's sovereignty over Greenland and has given us the opportunity to study the effects of climate change on the Greenland Ice Sheet over the last 80 years.

Ice

Ice
by Shane Johnson (Author)


In the late 1960s, NASA proposed hardware and mission parameters for an extended Apollo program that never materialized. Decades later, the existence of ice beds at the lunar south pole was discovered by NASA's space probe Clementine and confirmed by the lunar satellite Lunar Prospector. Now, author and Apollo missions historian Shane Johnson explores the fantastic possibilities of what might have transpired, had the more ambitious version of the Apollo program gone forward as originally planned. It is February, 1975. Apollo 19, the last of the manned lunar missions, has successfully landed. Exhilarated and confident, Commander Gary Lucas and Lunar Module pilot Charlie Shepherd set out to explore a vast, mysterious depression at the lunar south pole. There, in the icy darkness-where...

Ice Fishing The Ultimate Guide

Ice Fishing The Ultimate Guide
by Tim Allard (Author)


Whether you're a beginner or an expert, a lone wolf angler or a parent with fish-fanatic youngsters, fishing on ice has lots to offer everyone. But fishing on ice isn't without it's challenges, and that's where this book comes in. Ice Fishing: The Ultimate Guide covers everything you need to know to make your hard water adventures as comfortable, safe, enjoyable and productive as possible. The first part of the book looks at the equipment that's involved with ice fishing. The second part of the book takes an in depth look at winter's best sport fish, including walleye, perch, crappie, pike, trout, whitefish, sunfish, catfish, bass and more. For each species, you'll find detailed information about them, where you can expect to find them, and the different strategies for catching them....

The Ice Limit

The Ice Limit
by Douglas Preston (Author), Lincoln Child (Author)


The largest known meteorite has been discovered, entombed in the earth for millions of years on a frigid, desolate island off the southern tip of Chile. At four thousand tons, this treasure seems impossible to move. New York billionaire Palmer Lloyd is determined to have this incredible find for his new museum. Stocking a cargo ship with the finest scientists and engineers, he builds a flawless expedition. But from the first approach to the meteorite, people begin to die. A frightening truth is about to unfold: The men and women of the Rolvaag are not taking this ancient, enigmatic object anywhere. It is taking them.

Ice Ages: Solving the Mystery

Ice Ages: Solving the Mystery
by John Imbrie (Author), Katherine Palmer Imbrie (Author)


This book tells the exciting story of the ice ages--what they were like, why they occurred, and when the next one is due. The solution to the ice age mystery originated when the National Science Foundation organized the CLIMAP project to study changes in the earth's climate over the past 700,000 years. One of the goals was to produce a map of the earth during the last ice age. Scientists examined cores of sediment from the Indian Ocean bed and deciphered a continuous history for the past 500,000 years. Their work ultimately confirmed the theory that the earth's irregular orbital motions account for the bizarre climatic changes which bring on ice ages.This is a tale of scientific discovery and the colorful people who participated: Louis Agassiz, the young Swiss naturalist whose geological...

© 2016 BrightSurf.com