Science Current Events | Science News | Brightsurf.com
 

Plasma-based treatment goes viral

December 06, 2011

Life-threatening viruses such as HIV, SARS, hepatitis and influenza, could soon be combatted in an unusual manner as researchers have demonstrated the effectiveness of plasma for inactivating and preventing the replication of adenoviruses.

When exposed to plasma - the fourth state of matter in addition to solids, liquids and gases - for a period of just 240 seconds, it was found that only one in a million viruses could still replicate - practically all were inactivated.

The study, published in IOP Publishing's Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, is one of the first to concentrate specifically on viruses and builds on research that has already shown the usefulness of plasma in eradicating bacteria from skin (http://www.iop.org/news/09/november/page_42357.html) and sterilising water (http://www.iop.org/news/11/nov/page_52641.html).

Within a hospital environment, a plasma generating device could realistically rid hands of potentially lethal viruses that relay on a host organism to replicate and spread. In the long-term, plasma could be inhaled directly to treat viruses in the lungs, or applied to blood outside of the body to remove any viruses before transfusion.

The researchers, from the Max-Planck Institut für extraterrestrische Physik and Technische Universität München, specifically chose adenoviruses to examine as they are one of the most difficult viruses to inactivate. Illnesses resulting from this specific virus, for example, can only be managed by treating symptoms and complications of the infection, rather than targeting the actual virus itself.

Adenoviruses predominantly cause respiratory illnesses such as pneumonia and bronchitis and are hard to inactivate as the whole virus is encased in a protein layer, helping it to remain physically stable and tolerate moderate increases in heat and pH.

In this study, the adenoviruses were diluted to specific concentrations and then exposed to plasma for 240 seconds, before being incubated for an hour. A control group of adenoviruses were given the exact same treatment apart from the plasma exposure.

Two separate cell lines were then infected with the two sets of adenoviruses: the ones that were treated with plasma and the control group. To test whether a cell had the virus or not, the researchers programmed the virus to produce a protein that fluoresced green when a specific type of light was shone onto it.

Whilst the exact mechanisms behind the plasma's impressive effects are relatively unknown, it is thought that they are a result of a combination of reactions between the plasma and surrounding air, which create similar species to the ones found in our own immune system when under microbial attack.


Institute of Physics


Related Adenoviruses Current Events and Adenoviruses News Articles


Junction opening protein boosts cancer-killing effect of oncolytic virus
A new study shows that the anti-tumor effect of oncolytic virus therapy is significantly greater in mice when the virus is genetically modified to express a junction opening (JO) protein, which helps the cancer-killing agent better penetrate solid tumors.

How DNA can take on the properties of sand or toothpaste
When does DNA behave like sand or toothpaste? When the genetic material is so densely packed within a virus, it can behave like grains of sand or toothpaste in a tube.

Global infection outbreaks, unique diseases rising since 1980
Enterovirus. Tuberculosis. Cholera. Measles. Various strains of the flu and hepatitis.

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses
The same viruses that make us sick can take up residence in and on the human body without provoking a sneeze, cough or other troublesome symptom, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Single mutation gives virus new target
A mutation as minute as swapping just one amino acid can completely change the target that a virus will bind to on a victim cell - potentially shifting what kind of cell and eventually what kind of organism a virus could infect.

Novel drug prevents common viral disease in stem-cell transplant patients, study finds
A new drug can often prevent a common, sometimes severe viral disease in patients receiving a transplant of donated blood-making stem cells, a clinical trial led by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital indicates.

Adenoviruses may pose risk for monkey-to-human leap
Adenoviruses commonly infect humans, causing colds, flu-like symptoms and sometimes even death, but now UC San Francisco researchers have discovered that a new species of adenovirus can spread from primate to primate, and potentially from monkey to human.

Scientists Identify Promising Antiviral Compounds
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have identified two promising candidates for the development of drugs against human adenovirus, a cause of ailments ranging from colds to gastrointestinal disorders to pink eye.

Predicting the next eye pathogen; analysis of a novel adenovirus
The ongoing dance between a virus and its host distinctly shapes how the virus evolves. While human adenoviruses typically cause mild infections, recent reports have described newly characterized adenoviruses that can cause severe, sometime fatal, human infections.

New cancer 'vaccine' shows future promise in treating and preventing metastatic cancers
Preclinical, laboratory studies suggest a novel immunotherapy could potentially work like a vaccine against metastatic cancers, according to scientists at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center.
More Adenoviruses Current Events and Adenoviruses News Articles

Upper Respiratory Tract Infections e chart: Full illustrated

Upper Respiratory Tract Infections e chart: Full illustrated


Upper Respiratory Tract Infections e chart

Table of Contents
Upper Respiratory Tract Infections
Sinusitis
Otitis
Pharyngotonsillitis
Viral Croup
Prevention



Adenovirus Methods and Protocols: Volume 1: Adenoviruses, Ad Vectors, Quantitation, and Animal Models (Methods in Molecular Medicine)

Adenovirus Methods and Protocols: Volume 1: Adenoviruses, Ad Vectors, Quantitation, and Animal Models (Methods in Molecular Medicine)
by William S. M. Wold (Editor), Ann E. Tollefson (Editor)


Adenovirus Methods and Protocols, Second Edition, now in two volumes, is an essential resource for adenovirus (Ad) researchers beginning in the field, and an inspirational starting point for researchers looking to branch into new areas of Ad study. In addition to updating and expanding the first edition, the authors have added new chapters that address innovative areas of emphasis in Ad research, including Ad vector construction and use, real-time PCR, use of new animal models, and methods for quantification of Ad virus or virus expression/interactions. Each of the protocols presented in these volumes is written by trendsetting researchers.

Adenoviruses: Webster's Timeline History, 1919 - 2007

Adenoviruses: Webster's Timeline History, 1919 - 2007
by Icon Group International (Author)


Webster's bibliographic and event-based timelines are comprehensive in scope, covering virtually all topics, geographic locations and people. They do so from a linguistic point of view, and in the case of this book, the focus is on "Adenoviruses," including when used in literature (e.g. all authors that might have Adenoviruses in their name). As such, this book represents the largest compilation of timeline events associated with Adenoviruses when it is used in proper noun form. Webster's timelines cover bibliographic citations, patented inventions, as well as non-conventional and alternative meanings which capture ambiguities in usage. These furthermore cover all parts of speech (possessive, institutional usage, geographic usage) and contexts, including pop culture, the arts, social...

The Adenoviruses (The Viruses)

The Adenoviruses (The Viruses)
by Harold S. Ginsberg (Editor)


The discovery of adenoviruses naturally induced a new interest in viruses of the human upper respiratory tract since previously unknown viruses infecting this portion of the human body had not been identified in 20 years, and their unique characteristics stimulated investigations into the biochemical events essential for replication of animal viruses. Indeed, the field of molecular virology has evolved during the period since their dis­ covery, and adenoviruses have played a major role in this development. The exciting discoveries made with adenoviruses have had such a pro­ found effect on knowledge in basic virology, molecular biology, viral ge­ netics, human and animal infections, and cell transformation that this seemed a propitious time to have some of the major contributors review...

Adenoviruses: Model and Vectors in Virus-Host Interactions: Virion-Structure, Viral Replication and Host-Cell Interactions (Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology)

Adenoviruses: Model and Vectors in Virus-Host Interactions: Virion-Structure, Viral Replication and Host-Cell Interactions (Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology)
by Walter Doerfler (Editor), Petra Böhm (Editor)


After three volumes on adenoviruses in 1995 the past years have seen rapid progress in the field of adenovirus research. Moreover, adenoviruses have attracted considerable interest as vectors in gene transfer regimens.

  Therapeutic Applications of Adenoviruses (Gene and Cell Therapy)
by Philip Ng (Editor), Nicola Brunetti-Pierri (Editor)


Adenoviruses are double stranded DNA viruses that have been used to study the process of DNA replication. Studies of the mode of action of adenovirally produced tumors in rodents led to the discovery of tumour supressor genes. The adenoviral vector is now the most used vector in clinical gene therapy especially for some kinds of cancers. The chapters in this book focus on the most up-to-date developments in the therapeutic applications of adenoviruses. The intended audience is individuals in the Life Sciences interested in therapeutic applications of adenoviruses. This book reviews the life history and immune responses to adenoviruses and summarizes various therapies implemented with the use of adenoviruses.

  Human Adenoviruses: From Villains to Vectors
by S Jane Flint (Author), Glen R Nemerow (Author)


Human adenoviruses play a central role in human diseases and as vectors for vaccines and gene delivery. This monograph describes the underlying principles of adenovirus molecular and structural biology, pathogenesis, antiviral measures and vector development. Much of the history of this virus and the many contributions made by its study are embedded in these discussions. Topics and questions that require further investigation are also considered.Although current virology textbooks cover topics related to adenoviruses, this book provides a comprehensive description of the virus and its interactions with the host. Students and researchers with a particular interest in adenoviruses, gene therapists, and virologists interested in viral pathogenesis will benefit from this book, which presents...

Viral Vectors for Gene Therapy: Methods and Protocols (Methods in Molecular Biology)

Viral Vectors for Gene Therapy: Methods and Protocols (Methods in Molecular Biology)
by Otto-Wilhelm Merten (Editor), Mohamed Al-Rubeai (Editor)


The huge potential for gene therapy to cure a wide range of diseases has led to high expectations and a great increase in research efforts in this area, particularly in the study of delivery via viral vectors, widely considered to be more efficient than DNA transfection.  In Viral Vectors for Gene Therapy: Methods and Protocols, experts in the field present a collection of their knowledge and experience featuring methodologies that involve virus production, transferring protocols, and evaluating the efficacy of gene products. While thoroughly covering the most popular viral vector systems of adenovirus, retrovirus, and adeno-associated virus, this detailed volume also explores less common viral vector systems such as baculovirus, herpes virus, and measles virus, the growing interest in...

The Adenoviruses (The Viruses) [Paperback] [2012] (Author) Harold S. Ginsberg

The Adenoviruses (The Viruses) [Paperback] [2012] (Author) Harold S. Ginsberg
by Springer (Publisher)




Adenoviruses: Basic Biology to Gene Therapy (Medical Intelligence Unit 15)

Adenoviruses: Basic Biology to Gene Therapy (Medical Intelligence Unit 15)
by Prem Seth (Editor)


Ever since their discovery, adenoviruses have proven to be tremendous asset to biologists. Through the study of the adenoviruses the authors have learned not only about the virus structures, mechanisms of viral replication, but also about eukaryotic gene expression, alternative splicing, regulation of cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. In the last five years, there has been an explosion in the use of adenoviruses as vectors for gene transfer to a variety of mammalian cells. Adenoviral vectors are also being tested in Phase I clinical trials for cystic fibrosis and for many kinds of cancers. These recent developments in utilizing adenoviral vectors for gene therapy have rejuvenate an interest in the basic science of adenovirus research. More importantly, it has generated a necessity...

© 2016 BrightSurf.com