Science Current Events | Science News | Brightsurf.com
 

New HIV-vaccine tested on people

February 14, 2012
Scientists from the Antwerp Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp University Hospital and Antwerp University have tested a new 'therapeutic vaccine' against HIV on volunteers. The participants were so to say vaccinated with their own cells. The researchers filtered certain white blood cells out of the volunteer's blood, 'loaded' them outside the body and then gave them back. The immune system of the testees was better than before in attacking and suppressing the virus, the scientists reported in the top journal AIDS. But they still cannot cure the disease.

Actually, medical science can control an HIV-infection quite well, with a medicine cocktail. 'Seropositive' people (people who are infected with the HIV virus) now can lead a reasonably normal life, but their virus is not exterminated. When they stop the treatment it immediately rebounds.

Science knows what the problem is: the 'special forces' in our blood (the CD8 cells, in medical lingo) get not enough support from the general staff (the dendritic cells, that show the combat units what to attack). Dendritic cells exhibit on their exterior typical parts of the virus to be attacked. But human dendritic cells are not that good in getting the right information on the HIV virus and to transform it into good examples for the CD8 battle cells.

The virologists and HIV-physicians of the Institute of Tropical Medicine and the haematologists of Antwerp University Hospital have cooperated for years on that problem. Together they succeeded to 'load' dendritic cells of seropositive volunteers in the lab with the building instructions (genetic information in the form of so-called messenger RNA) for HIV proteins. They could make the dendritic cells to execute the instructions and to exhibit the resulting typical part of the HIV virus on their surface. Subsequent research in test tubes demonstrated that the 'loaded' dendritic cells were able to activate battle cells.

Time had come to proceed to humans. Flemish, Belgian and French research foundations provided grants. Six seropositive persons who for a long time already used the drug cocktails, were prepared to volunteer. The scientists filtered the dendritic cells from a large volume of their blood, cultivated them in test tubes in the cell-therapy unit of the Antwerp University Hospital and provided them with the genetic instructions of an HIV virus. They then froze the loaded cells.

The volunteers received four times, with four-week intervals, a small quantity of their own reworked dendritic cells. And indeed, after each vaccination the CD8 battle cells in their bodies recognised the virus better and better, while the vaccination had virtually no side effects. The most important result was that the vaccine-activated battle cells became better and better in suppressing the virus, in test tubes for the moment. But HIV remains a disguise artist; it still succeeds in changing its proteins sufficiently fast and often to let at least a few viruses escape the attack.

So it remains impossible to cure AIDS, but the results are encouraging: the vaccine, made of the participant's own dendritic cells, is safe and has some therapeutic effect, be it a limited one. But sufficiently strong for a publication in the most renowned journal for HIV researchers, AIDS. And more than sufficient to enthuse and motivate the Antwerp scientists.

Institute of Tropical Medicine Antwerp


Related HIV Vaccine Current Events and HIV Vaccine News Articles


NIH-led scientists discover HIV antibody that binds to novel target on virus
An NIH-led team of scientists has discovered a new vulnerability in the armor of HIV that a vaccine, other preventive regimen or treatment could exploit.

New research offers hope for HIV vaccine development
In a scientific discovery that has significant implications for HIV vaccine development, collaborators at the Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and Duke University School of Medicine have uncovered novel properties of special HIV antibodies.

Biomarker discovery may lead to new HIV treatment
Further analysis of a Phase II study of therapeutic HIV vaccine candidate Vacc-4x revealed a potential biomarker associated with participants who experienced a more profound viral load reduction after receiving the vaccine.

UNL team awarded $1.9M to develop new approach to HIV vaccine
Using a genetically modified form of the HIV virus, a team of University of Nebraska-Lincoln scientists has developed a promising new approach that could someday lead to a more effective HIV vaccine.

NIH grantees sharpen understanding of antibodies that may cut risk of HIV infection
What immune response should a vaccine elicit to prevent HIV infection?

New research on potent HIV antibodies
The discovery of how a KwaZulu-Natal woman's body responded to her HIV infection by making potent antibodies (called broadly neutralising antibodies, because they are able to kill multiple strains of HIV from across the world), was reported today by the CAPRISA consortium of AIDS researchers jointly with scientists from the United States.

Study of antibody evolution charts course toward HIV vaccine
In an advance for HIV vaccine research, a scientific team has discovered how the immune system makes a powerful antibody that blocks HIV infection of cells by targeting a site on the virus called V1V2.

Durable end to AIDS will require HIV vaccine development
Broader global access to lifesaving antiretroviral therapies and wider implementation of proven HIV prevention strategies could potentially control and perhaps end the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

Animal vaccine study yields insights that may advance HIV vaccine research
A vaccine study in monkeys designed to identify measurable signs that the animals were protected from infection by SIV, the monkey version of HIV, as well as the mechanism of such protection has yielded numerous insights that may advance HIV vaccine research.

HIV-1 movement across genital tract cells surprisingly enhanced by usurping antibody response
Infectious disease researchers have identified a novel mechanism wherein HIV-1 may facilitate its own transmission by usurping the antibody response directed against itself.
More HIV Vaccine Current Events and HIV Vaccine News Articles

Immunology and the Quest for an HIV Vaccine: A New Perspective

Immunology and the Quest for an HIV Vaccine: A New Perspective
by Dr. Omar Bagasra (Author)


How many human immune systems are there? How old are they? Why is there no AIDS vaccine? Is a new approach needed? Why is public opinion growing skeptical of the scientific community after three decades of public awareness about HIV/AIDS? Consider answers to these puzzling questions. Learn from the decades of experience of two senior scholars: Dr. Omar Bagasra (an eminent molecular biologist, immunologist, and retrovirologist) and Dr. Donald Gene Pace (a highly published writer who examines public health policy). Explore intriguing new possibilities about human immunity, and the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. Read Immunology and the Quest for an HIV Vaccine. Benefit from an informed synthesis backed by a wealth of peer-reviewed scientific references. Review basic concepts of...

Immunology and the Quest for an HIV Vaccine: A New Perspective

Immunology and the Quest for an HIV Vaccine: A New Perspective
by AuthorHouse


"How many human immune systems are there? How old are they? Why is there no AIDS vaccine? Is a new approach needed? Why is public opinion growing skeptical of the scientific community after three decades of public awareness about HIV/AIDS?

Consider answers to these puzzling questions. Learn from the decades of experience of two senior scholars: Dr. Omar Bagasra (an eminent molecular biologist, immunologist, and retrovirologist) and Dr. Donald Gene Pace (a highly published writer who examines public health policy). Explore intriguing new possibilities about human immunity, and the development of an effective AIDS vaccine.

Read Immunology and the Quest for an HIV Vaccine. Benefit from an informed synthesis backed by a wealth of peer-reviewed scientific references....

HIV Essentials 2014

HIV Essentials 2014
by Paul E. Sax (Author), Calvin J. Cohen (Author), Daniel R. Kuritzkes (Author)


The world's leading experts provide all the 'essentials' needed to manage HIV patients in the office, on the ward, and in the ICU. Completely revised and updated, HIV Essentials 2014 incorporates the latest clinical guidelines into a step-by-step guide to the diagnosis, evaluation, management, and prevention of HIV infection and its complications. Topics include: opportunistic infections and other HIV complications, treatment of HIV and pregnancy, antiretroviral drug summaries, post-exposure prophylaxis, as well as commercially available dosage forms for all ARVs.

The River : A Journey to the Source of HIV and AIDS

The River : A Journey to the Source of HIV and AIDS
by Edward Hooper (Author)


While science has devoted much of its efforts to finding a cure for AIDS, the sources of this deadly epidemic remain largely unexamined. Distinguished science journalist Edward Hooper presents the meticulously researched -- and highly readable -- history of HIV and its possible origins. Pursuing leads across the U.S., the Caribbean, Europe, and Africa, Hooper pieces together the tantalizing clues offered by long-archived blood samples, early AIDS-like cases (such as the "Manchester sailor" case of 1959), immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs), and the medical interventions in Africa and elsewhere that may have played a role in SIVs' crossover into humans.Hooper examines over two dozen theories of origin, and eventually discards most of them. What remains is a remarkable and well-supported theory...

Current vaccine strategies against HIV

Current vaccine strategies against HIV
by The Research


In the last decade HIV has become a global epidemic, in 2009 there was a record of 33.3 million people living with HIV and 1.8 million deaths by AIDS (WHO, 2009). Considering that HIV is such a large epidemic disease, causing a high mortality rate there is no such vaccine developed as of yet, to prevent HIV infection with a significant level of success.

Handbook of HIV and Social Work: Principles, Practice, and Populations

Handbook of HIV and Social Work: Principles, Practice, and Populations
by Cynthia Cannon Poindexter (Author)


Praise for Handbook of HIV and Social Work"Cynthia Cannon Poindexter has given us a remarkable edited volume that contains much information on HIV that every professional social worker needs to know in order to practice competently in today's complex world."—From the Foreword by Vincent J. Lynch, MSW, PhD, Boston College Graduate School of Social Work"This comprehensive handbook assembles a group of social work scholars and practitioners to participate in, guide, and address many of the unresolved challenges characterizing the HIV debates. This handbook is a valuable and timely addition to the literature."—King Davis, MSW, PhD, The Robert Lee Sutherland Chair in Mental Health and Social Policy, The University of Texas at Austin School of Social Work"This handbook is an outstanding...

HIV/AIDS: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)

HIV/AIDS: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)
by Alan Whiteside (Author)


HIV/AIDS is without doubt the worst epidemic to hit humankind since the Black Death. As of 2004 an estimated 40 million people were living with the disease, and about 20 million had died. Despite rapid scientific advances there is still no cure and the drugs are expensive and toxic. In the developing world, especially in parts of Africa, life expectancy has plummeted to below 35 years, causing a serious decline in economic growth, a sharp increase in orphans, and the imminent collapse of health care systems. The news is not all bleak though. There have been unprecedented breakthroughs in understanding diseases and developing drugs. Because the disease is so closely linked to sexual activity and drug use, the need to understand and change behavior has caused us to reassess what it means...

HIV/AIDS (Health and Medical Issues Today)

HIV/AIDS (Health and Medical Issues Today)
by John E. Glass Ph.D. (Author), Kathy Stolley (Author)


Once thought to be a disease of homosexuals and drug abusers, AIDS has now impacted people across cultures, genders, and sexual orientations. Despite activism, new research, and treatments, many people are still dying from this disease. HIV/AIDS≪/i> offers a comprehensive, one-volume resource that traces the history of the disease, and discusses prevention, along with current research and treatment. It examines issues such as care giving, health care settings, human rights, pregnancy, and insurance. The incidence and prognosis for the disease among special populations, as well as their needs and struggles, are covered in detail. These groups include: drug and alcohol abusers, the gay and lesbian community, minority communities, pediatric patients, prisoners, senior citizens, and women....

HIV: From Biology to Prevention and Treatment (Subject Collections from Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology)

HIV: From Biology to Prevention and Treatment (Subject Collections from Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology)
by Frederic D Bushman (Editor), Gary J. Nabel (Editor), Ronald Swanstrom (Editor)


The worldwide AIDS epidemic makes research on HIV, the disease processes it induces, and potential HIV therapies among the most critical in biomedical science. Furthermore, the basic biology of HIV infections provides a model for a more general understanding of retroviruses and their hosts.

Written and edited by experts in the field, this collection from Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine provides a comprehensive review of HIV research, covering everything from the pathogenesis of HIV infection to prevention. Contributors explore the origins and evolution of HIV, the HIV replication cycle, hostvirus interactions, host immune responses, and HIV transmission. Vaccines, cell and gene therapies, antiretroviral drugs, microbicides, and behavioral strategies for the treatment...

HIV Essentials 2013

HIV Essentials 2013
by Paul E. Sax (Author), Calvin J. Cohen (Author), Daniel R. Kuritzkes (Author)


The world's leading experts provide all the 'Essentials' needed to manage patients in the office, on the ward, and in the ICU. Completely revised and updated, HIV Essentials 2013 incorporates the latest clinical guidelines into a step-by-step guide to the diagnosis, evaluation, management, and prevention of HIV infection and its complications. Topics include: opportunistic infections and other HIV complications, treatment of HIV and pregnancy, antiretroviral drug summaries, post-exposure prophylaxis, as well as commercially available dosage forms for all ARVs.

© 2014 BrightSurf.com