Science Current Events | Science News | Brightsurf.com
 

Tennessee's Urban Forests Valued in the Billions

March 15, 2012
Nasheville, TN -- Tennessee's urban forests, currently valued at about $80 billion, also provide almost $650 million in benefits such as carbon storage, pollution removal, and energy reduction according to a new U.S. Forest Service report.

The authors of Urban Forests of Tennessee, 2009 found there are 284 million trees in urban areas in the state, with canopies covering 33.7 percent of 1.6 million acres of urban area. Those urban forests provide an estimated $204 million per year in pollution removal and $66 million per year in energy savings. The study is the first of its kind in Tennessee.

"This report, for the first time, puts a face on the urban forest resource and what it means to the state in terms of economic and environmental value," said Steven Scott, Tennessee State Forester and head of the Tennessee Division of Forestry, which collected the data for the report. "Perhaps the most significant finding is the immediate impact of urban trees on the use of energy, the savings we get as a result of shade near homes, businesses and industrial areas."

David Nowak, Northern Research Station project leader and research forester, led the pilot study, which sampled trees in all the state's urban area and analyzed their value using a model developed by the Forest Service.

"Urban forests make our cities healthier, more vibrant places to live," said Nowak. "They provide healthy outdoor spaces for our kids, they clean our air and water, and -- as this study shows -- they provide tremendous economic benefits. We must continue our work to protect these critical natural resources."

There are more than 100 million acres of urban forest across the U.S., but a recent study shows that many are in decline.

The Tennessee report includes an extensive assessment of urban forest health, providing information about present damage and potential risks. In addition to nonnative invasive plants, Tennessee urban forests face risks from exotic pests that include the recently discovered thousand cankers disease, which impacts black walnut; hemlock woolly adelgid, which kills eastern and Carolina hemlocks; the Asian longhorned beetle, which kills a wide range of hardwood species; and the emerald ash borer, which decimates ash trees. This last insect was recently documented in East Tennessee.

The Forest Service Inventory and Analysis and Community Forestry Programs partnered with Tennessee Division of Forestry and researchers from the Forest Service Northern Research Station and SRS on the project.

To access the full report in PDF format: http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/40246

U.S. Forest Service


Related Urban Forest Current Events and Urban Forest News Articles


Forest Service Study Finds Urban Trees Removing Fine Particulate Air Pollution, Saving Lives
In the first effort to estimate the overall impact of a city's urban forest on concentrations of fine particulate pollution (particulate matter less than 2.5 microns, or PM2.5), a U.S. Forest Service and Davey Institute study found that urban trees and forests are saving an average of one life every year per city. In New York City, trees save an average of eight lives every year.

Do urban 'heat islands' hint at trees of future?
City streets can be mean, but somewhere near Brooklyn, a tree grows far better than its country cousins, due to chronically elevated city heat levels, says a new study.

Application quantifies carbon sequestration of urban trees
U.S. Forest Service scientists at the Center for Urban Forest Research are providing online software that can show users how much carbon dioxide an urban tree in California has sequestered in its lifetime and the past year.

Urbanization favors sedentary males
Urbanization changes landscapes and local environments, which can alter the life histories and traits of the creatures living in and around these areas.
More Urban Forest Current Events and Urban Forest News Articles

Urban Forests, Trees, and Greenspace: A Political Ecology Perspective

Urban Forests, Trees, and Greenspace: A Political Ecology Perspective
by L. Anders Sandberg (Editor), Adrina Bardekjian (Editor), Sadia Butt (Editor)


Urban forests, trees and greenspace are critical in contemporary planning and development of the city. Their study is not only a question of the growth and conservation of green spaces, but also has social, cultural and psychological dimensions. This book brings a perspective of political ecology to the complexities of urban trees and forests through three themes: human agency in urban forests and greenspace; arboreal and greenspace agency in the urban landscape; and actions and interventions in the urban forest.  Contributors include leading authorities from North America and Europe from a range of disciplines, including forestry, ecology, geography, landscape design, municipal planning, environmental policy and environmental history.

The Forest Bull (The Fearless Book 1)

The Forest Bull (The Fearless Book 1)


Three lovers. Two immortals. One mystery.
When Ring Hardigan isn’t making sandwiches for, and with, his two partners, Waleska and Risa (they’re cool like that), he’s got a busy schedule doing the dirty work of sending immortals to the ever after. Wally and Risa provide linguistics, logistics, and finding the right place for him and his knife.
A reclusive Baron from the timelost forests of Europe asks for their help—find a stolen collection of jewelry, and find the thief—his daughter Elizabeth, an immortal of purest evil who wants nothing less than control of Hell itself. With the help of a 2400 year old succubus hooker named Delphine, they might just live long enough to discover what is evil, who is human, and exactly who wants to reign in hell.


Toronto's Ravines and Urban Forests: Their natural heritage and local history

Toronto's Ravines and Urban Forests: Their natural heritage and local history
by Jason Ramsay-Brown (Author)


Ravines are one of the wonders of Toronto. Cutting deep through the city, they are islands of natural heritage. While the city carries on above them and inevitably has its impact, the ravines still offer surprising ecological diversity. And they have much to tell about Toronto's history. Jason Ramsay-Brown has had a lifelong fascination with ravines, and he has spent years exploring them and discovering their little-known history. For the past 15 years he has explored more than 100 of these ravines, and hundreds of kilometres of trails weaving in and out of them. In this book he shares his knowledge so that Torontonians and visitors alike can better appreciate their ravine heritage. Among the 30 ravines across the city featured in this book are: Gates Gully in the Scarborough Bluffs area,...

Stormwater to Street Trees: Engineering Urban Forests for Stormwater Management

Stormwater to Street Trees: Engineering Urban Forests for Stormwater Management
by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Author)


The presence of trees in a streetscape, neighborhood, and community can decrease the amount of stormwater runoff and pollutants that reach local waters. Cities employ a variety of measures to manage stormwater runoff. However, most do not take advantage of the stormwater utility benefits trees provide. In urban areas, trees are part of the managed municipal infrastructure. Installing trees in locations that are engineered to retain stormwater is a great way to augment existing stormwater management systems, increasing their capacity and improving water quality while greatly improving urban forest canopy. This guide is an introduction to those engineered systems available, and in use today, that utilize trees to manage a volume of stormwater.

Urban Green: Nature, Recreation, and the Working Class in Industrial Chicago

Urban Green: Nature, Recreation, and the Working Class in Industrial Chicago
by Colin Fisher (Author)


In early twentieth-century America, affluent city-dwellers made a habit of venturing out of doors and vacationing in resorts and national parks. Yet the rich and the privileged were not the only ones who sought respite in nature. In this pathbreaking book, historian Colin Fisher demonstrates that working-class white immigrants and African Americans in rapidly industrializing Chicago also fled the urban environment during their scarce leisure time. If they had the means, they traveled to wilderness parks just past the city limits as well as to rural resorts in Wisconsin and Michigan. But lacking time and money, they most often sought out nature within the city itself--at urban parks and commercial groves, along the Lake Michigan shore, even in vacant lots. Chicagoans enjoyed a variety of...

Shading Our Cities: A Resource Guide For Urban And Community Forests

Shading Our Cities: A Resource Guide For Urban And Community Forests
by American Forestry Association (Author), Gary Moll (Editor), Sara Ebenreck (Editor), Dale Robertson (Editor)


Shading Our Cities is a handbook to help neighborhood groups, local officials, and city planners develop urban forestry projects, not only to beautify their cities, but also to reduce energy demand, improve air quality, protect water supplies, and contribute to healthier living conditions.

Urban Forest Landscapes: Integrating Multidisciplinary Perspectives

Urban Forest Landscapes: Integrating Multidisciplinary Perspectives
by Gordon Bradley (Editor)


The goal of urban forestry is to understand the ecological, institutional, and human issues at work in the urban landscape. Urban forestry is a comparatively new field within the academic discipline of forestry, and is closely allied to several scientific disciplines as well as the social sciences. Professionals in the field are called upon to provide scientific information and guidance, and to justify in economic, social, and environmental terms the value of the urban landscape in relation to other uses of the land and other needs of the city.

The multidisciplinary approach of this book recognizes the dilemma that in the attempt to solve problems by developing landscapes that address specific goals such as fire safety, energy and water conservation, and wildlife preservation,...

Land Use and Forest Resources in a Changing Environment: The Urban/Forest Interface (The Geo. S. Long Publication Series)

Land Use and Forest Resources in a Changing Environment: The Urban/Forest Interface (The Geo. S. Long Publication Series)
by National Symposium on the Urban (Author), Forest Interface: Land Use and Forest (Author), Gordon A. Bradley (Author), Gordon A. Bradley (Editor), University of Washington College of Forest Resources (Editor)




Edgewood

Edgewood
by Karen McQuestion


“I devoured it in one sitting!” New York Times Bestselling Author Lesley Kagen.

“Edgewood was better than Divergent and The Hunger Games. Edgewood is different. Edgewood was mind blowingly amazing.” Olivia at Fictionally Obsessed

From bestselling author Karen McQuestion—a brand new, spellbinding novel.
Wandering the dark streets at night is Russ Becker’s way of dealing with his relentless insomnia and the angst of life. But that changes forever the night he witnesses a strange astronomical event, then discovers he’s developed incredible superpowers.

And he’s not alone. Three others in his town—sexy Mallory, arrogant Jameson, and mysterious Nadia—have had the same experience and acquired intriguing powers of their own. As...

The Familiar, Volume 2: Into the Forest

The Familiar, Volume 2: Into the Forest
by Mark Z. Danielewski (Author)


The Familiar, Volume 1  Wherein the cat is found . . .
The Familiar, Volume 2  Wherein the cat is hungry . . .
  
From the universally acclaimed, genre-busting author of House of Leaves comes the second volume of The Familiar, a “novel [which] goes beyond the experimental into the visionary, creating a language and style that expands the horizon of meaning . . . hint[ing] at an evolved form of literature.”*
 
In The Familiar, Volume 2: Into the Forest, the lives of the disparate and dynamic nine characters introduced in “One Rainy Day in May” begin to intersect in inexplicable ways, finding harmonies and echoes in each other. What once  seemed remote and disconnected draws closer—slowly, steadily—toward something inevitable. . . . At the center...

© 2015 BrightSurf.com