Science Current Events | Science News |

New Study Finds a Protein Combination (Soy, Whey, Casein) is Best to Consume Post-Workout for Building Muscle

April 24, 2012
Today at Experimental Biology 2012, Dr. Blake Rasmussen and colleagues presented a new and first-of-its-kind clinical study: "Effect of Protein Blend vs. Whey Protein Ingestion on Muscle Protein Synthesis Following Resistance Exercise." The results of this study suggest that a protein blend (combination of soy, whey and casein) may be best to consume post-workout for building muscle. Specifically, the blend of proteins in this study showed an increase in a person's "anabolic window" (the amount of time it takes for building muscle to occur post exercise).

"This study confirms that consuming a blend of proteins (soy, whey and casein) versus whey protein alone provides a prolonged delivery of amino acids to the muscles, making it optimal for consumption following resistance exercise," said Dr. Rasmussen, professor and interim chair of the Department of Nutrition & Metabolism at the University of Texas Medical Branch and the senior author of this study. "The results of this study are critical for sports nutrition consumers and regularly active individuals."

The protein in the blend used in this study consisted of 25 percent isolated soy protein, 25 percent isolated whey protein and 50 percent casein. This combination of protein blends was determined in a preclinical study, of which was presented at Experimental Biology 2011.
Soy, whey and casein proteins are all absorbed at different rates during digestion. Whey protein is referred to as a "fast" protein because it is rapidly absorbed whereas casein, a "slow" protein, requires several hours to be digested. The ability of soy protein to deliver amino acids is "intermediate," meaning concentrations in blood peak somewhat later compared to whey, but its digestion rate is much quicker than casein. Hence, the effect of all three of these proteins combined appears to provide the extended release of amino acid delivery to the muscles.

"Your muscles don't recover in 30 minutes. It takes at least 24-48 hours for your muscles to recover after a resistance exercise," said Greg Paul, global marketing director for sports nutrition and weight management, Solae. "This study showed that protein blends can provide amino acid delivery for up to five hours, meaning if you consume a product or protein shake with these blends, the prolonged effect will deliver essential amino acids to feed your muscles until your next meal."

This was a double-blind, randomized clinical trial in nineteen young adults before and after ingestion of ~19 grams of protein from the blend or ~17.5 grams of whey protein (10 and 9, respectively, per group).

Additional detailed results from this study will be revealed at the upcoming American College of Sports Medicine annual meeting May 29-June 2 in San Francisco, Calif. This study used Solae™ SUPRO® isolated soy protein. For more information on this study, contact Dr. Rasmussen at

Solae, LLC is a world leader in developing soy-based ingredients for nutritious, great-tasting products. Solae provides solutions that deliver a unique combination of functional, nutritional, economical and sustainable benefits to our customers. Headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, the company was formed through a joint venture between DuPont (NYSE: DD) and Bunge (NYSE: BG) in 2003. Solae is a recipient of the 2011-2012 Ethisphere's Ethics Inside Certification and was recognized as one of the "World's Most Ethical Companies" in 2010, 2011 and 2012. For more information, visit, or follow the company on Twitter at, Facebook at, and LinkedIn at

Solae, LLC

Related Proteins Current Events and Proteins News Articles

Genetic variation is key to fighting viruses
Using a genome-wide association study, EPFL scientists have identified subtle genetic changes that can cause substantial differences to how we fight viral infections.

New protein cleanup factors found to control bacterial growth
Biochemists have long known that crucial cell processes depend on a highly regulated cleanup system known as proteolysis, where specialized proteins called proteases degrade damaged or no-longer-needed proteins.

Researchers unlock secrets of troublesome Tribble protein
Scientists from New Zealand and Australia have created the first three-dimensional image of a key protein involved in the development of blood and other cancers.

A multilaminar model explains the structure of chromosomal aberrations in cancer cells
During cell division, each metaphase chromosome contains a single enormously long DNA molecule that is associated with histone proteins and forms a long chromatin filament with many nucleosomes.

Researchers create 'leukemia in a dish' to better study it
Scientists engineered stem cells to better understand the mechanisms behind a form of leukemia caused by changes in a key gene, according to a study led by Mount Sinai researchers and published online today in the journal Cell Reports.

Immune gene prevents Parkinson's disease and dementia
An estimated seven to ten million people worldwide are living with Parkinson's disease (PD), which is an incurable and progressive disease of the nervous system affecting movement and cognitive function.

Artificial intelligence uncovers clues to why embryos develop abnormally
Uncle Joe smokes a pack a day, drinks like a fish and lives to a ripe old age. His brother, leading a similar lifestyle, succumbs to cancer at age 55.

Even if imprisoned inside a crystal, molecules can still move
X-ray crystallography reveals the three-dimensional structure of a molecule, thus making it possible to understand how it works and potentially use this knowledge to subsequently modulate its activity, especially for therapeutic or biotechnological purposes.

Jackson Laboratory researchers discover mutation involved in neurodegeneration
A mutation that increases the level of a special class of sphingolipids--molecules important to cell structure and signaling--can lead to neurodegeneration due to problems with neuronal membranes, reports a research team led by Jackson Laboratory Research Scientist Lihong Zhao, Ph.D. and Professor Patsy Nishina, Ph.D.

Sugar governs how antibodies work in the immune system
The immune system is our biological defense shield. Antibodies protect the organism against invading pathogens such as viruses or bacteria.
More Proteins Current Events and Proteins News Articles

Proteins: Structure and Function

Proteins: Structure and Function
by David Whitford (Author)

"Proteins: Structure and Function" is a comprehensive introduction to the study of proteins and their importance to modern biochemistry. Each chapter addresses the structure and function of proteins with a definitive theme designed to enhance student understanding. Opening with a brief historical overview of the subject the book moves on to discuss the 'building blocks' of proteins and their respective chemical and physical properties. Later chapters explore experimental and computational methods of comparing proteins, methods of protein purification and protein folding and stability.The latest developments in the field are included and key concepts introduced in a user-friendly way to ensure that students are able to grasp the essentials before moving on to more advanced study and...

Introduction to Proteins: Structure, Function, and Motion (Chapman & Hall/CRC Mathematical and Computational Biology)

Introduction to Proteins: Structure, Function, and Motion (Chapman & Hall/CRC Mathematical and Computational Biology)
by Amit Kessel (Author), Nir Ben-Tal (Author)

As the tools and techniques of structural biophysics assume greater roles in biological research and a range of application areas, learning how proteins behave becomes crucial to understanding their connection to the most basic and important aspects of life. With more than 350 color images throughout, Introduction to Proteins: Structure, Function, and Motion presents a unified, in-depth treatment of the relationship between the structure, dynamics, and function of proteins. Taking a structural–biophysical approach, the authors discuss the molecular interactions and thermodynamic changes that transpire in these highly complex molecules. The text incorporates various biochemical, physical, functional, and medical aspects. It covers different levels of protein structure, current methods...

Proteins: Structures and Molecular Properties

Proteins: Structures and Molecular Properties
by Thomas E. Creighton (Author)

In one convenient resource, Creighton's landmark textbook offers an expert introduction to all aspects of proteins--biosynthesis, evolution, structures, dynamics, ligand binding, and catalysis.  It works equally well as a reference or as a classroom text.

Introduction to Protein Structure

Introduction to Protein Structure
by Carl Branden (Author), John Tooze (Author)

Introduction to Protein Structure provides an account of the principles of protein structure, with examples of key proteins in their biological context generously illustrated in full-color to illuminate the structural principles described in the text. The first few chapters introduce the general principles of protein structure both for novices and for non-specialists needing a primer. Subsequent chapters use specific examples of proteins to show how they fulfill a wide variety of biological functions. The book ends with chapters on the experimental approach to determining and predicting protein structure, as well as engineering new proteins to modify their functions.

Introduction to Protein Science: Architecture, Function, and Genomics

Introduction to Protein Science: Architecture, Function, and Genomics
by Arthur M. Lesk (Author)

Designed for students in biology, biochemistry, and biomedicine, Introduction to Protein Science, Second Edition, provides a wide-ranging introduction to the contemporary study of proteins in health and disease. The text describes basic principles of protein structure and methods for studying them, illustrates the wide variety of functions that proteins have, and shows how their structures and functions are closely linked.

Introduction to Protein Science, Second Edition, relates the study of proteins to the context of modern high-throughput data streams of genomics and proteomics. It also provides a balanced treatment of the relationship between computational and experimental methods. The text is enhanced by marginal notes, exercises, problems, and "weblems" that develop students'...

The Protein Counter 3rd Edition

The Protein Counter 3rd Edition
by Jo-Ann Heslin M.A. R.D. CDN (Author), Ph.D. Karen J Nolan Ph.D. (Author)



Put the latest protein recommendations to work for you.

Every day your body must build and replace millions of cells—an impossible job without proteins. The amount you need changes with exercise, stress, weight loss, illness, injury, and pregnancy. That’s why your body is counting on you to eat the proteins it needs to maximize fitness, boost your immune system, protect you from chronic disease, help you lose weight and keep it off, and much more. The completely revised and updated Protein Counter will help you individualize a protein plan to keep your body active, strong, and healthy. u Protein, fat, carbohydrate, and calorie counts for more than 15,000 brand-name and generic foods,...

How Proteins Work

How Proteins Work
by Mike Williamson (Author)

How Proteins Work is an up-to-date and authoritative account of protein function in living systems, explained within the governing parameters of physics, chemistry, and evolution. This text will enable advanced undergraduate students in biochemistry and biophysics to understand the relationships among protein function, structure, and dynamics. It will also serve as a valuable resource for graduate students and researchers looking for a reference on the fundamentals underlying protein function. By providing an integrated view of proteins at both a cellular and systemic level, this textbook shows how evolution drives proteins to adopt domain structures that combine to achieve biological outcomes. The association of proteins into dimers, molecular machines, and multi-enzymatic complexes...

The Flexible Dieting Cookbook: 160 Delicious High Protein Recipes for Building Healthy Lean Muscle & Shredding Fat

The Flexible Dieting Cookbook: 160 Delicious High Protein Recipes for Building Healthy Lean Muscle & Shredding Fat
by Scott James (Author)

Frustrated with your diet? Sick of eating the same bland food? The Flexible Dieting Cookbook is a must read. Containing over 160 delicious high protein recipes that will help you lose fat and build healthy lean muscle in no time! Best of all – all of the meals within this book are EASY and INEXPENSIVE to make, you don’t need to spend hours slaving away in the kitchen, delicious meals designed to help you achieve your fitness goals are only minutes away. Each recipe states the number of calories, with a macronutrient breakdown into Protein, Carbohydrates and Fats. This is far more than just a recipe book, I will explain how you tracking your macronutrients while eating these delicious meals will help you achieve the body of your dreams. The measurements and temperatures for each...

Ketogenic Diet: Ketogenic Snacks and Desserts: Top 35 Seriously Delicious Low Carb Ketogenic Recipes For Extreme Weight Loss (low carbohydrate, high protein, low carbohydrate foods)

Ketogenic Diet: Ketogenic Snacks and Desserts: Top 35 Seriously Delicious Low Carb Ketogenic Recipes For Extreme Weight Loss (low carbohydrate, high protein, low carbohydrate foods)

Thousands of people including top celebrities have discovered the
amazing ketogenic diet and are taking advantage of this low carb diet and lifestyle.
You'll Learn To Make Seriously Delicious Low Carb Ketogenic Recipes Including...
Bacon and Broccoli Breakfast Tart. Bacon and Broccoli Muffins. Chorizo and Spinach Casserole. Supercharged Mineral Chicken Broth. Almond Flour Sub. Smoked Salmon and Shrimp in Mushroom Cream. Uncured Bacon and Liver Meatballs.Much, much more!
For a full list of what you can see inside, scroll up and click on the look inside feature and check out the Table of Contents! 
Take Action Right Now...

Protein Power: The High-Protein/Low Carbohydrate Way to Lose Weight, Feel Fit, and Boost Your Health-in Just Weeks!

Protein Power: The High-Protein/Low Carbohydrate Way to Lose Weight, Feel Fit, and Boost Your Health-in Just Weeks!
by Michael R. Eades (Author), Mary Dan Eades (Author)

An effective, medically sound diet that lets you eat bacon, eggs, steak, even cheese?

It's true!  Lose fat.  Feel fit.  Stop craving.  Without counting fat grams and without giving up the foods you love.

Based on cutting-edge research, this revolutionary and deliciously satisfying plan has already helped thousands of patients lose weight and achieve other lifesaving health benefits, including lower cholesterol and blood pressure readings and an improvement or reversal of common disorders such as heart disease, adult-onset diabetes, and gout.  Developed by Doctors Michael and Mary Dan Eades, the simple regimen calls for a new way of eating: a protein-rich, moderate-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that will have you feeling better and more energetic within a week, and...

© 2015