Science Current Events | Science News | Brightsurf.com
 

Hubble observes a dwarf galaxy with a bright nebula

May 10, 2012

The starry mist streaking across this image obtained by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope is the central part of the dwarf galaxy known as NGC 2366. The most obvious feature in this galaxy is a large nebula visible in the upper-right part of the image, an object listed just a few entries prior in the New General Catalogue as NGC 2363.

A nearby yellowish swirl is not in fact part of the nebula. It is a spiral galaxy much further away, whose light is shining right through NGC 2366. This is possible because galaxies are not solid objects. While we see the stars because they shine brightly, galaxies are overwhelmingly made up of the empty space between them. Hubble's high-resolution image illustrates this perfectly: the stars are small points of light surrounded by the darkness of space.

The splendid interconnected objects of NGC 2366 and NGC 2363 are located about 10 million light-years away in the constellation of Camelopardalis (the Giraffe). As a dwarf galaxy, NGC 2366's size is in the same ballpark as the two main satellite galaxies of our Milky Way, named the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Like the Magellanic clouds, NGC 2366's lack of well-defined structure leads astronomers to further classify it as an irregular galaxy.

Although NGC 2366 might be small by the standards of galaxies, many of its stars are not, and the galaxy is home to numerous gigantic blue stars. The blue dots scattered throughout the galaxy speak to the burst of star formation that the galaxy has undergone in recent cosmic time. A new generation of these stellar titans has lit up the nebula NGC 2363.

In gas-rich star-forming regions, the ultraviolet radiation from young, big, blue stars excites the hydrogen gas, making it glow. NGC 2363, as well as other, smaller patches seen throughout Hubble's image, serve as the latest formation sites for stellar giants.

Imaged through green and infrared filters, these nebulae take on a blueish tinge in this image, though the actual colour is a shade of red.

This image was produced from two adjacent fields observed by Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys. The field of view is approximately 5.5 arcminutes across, which is equivalent to a little over a fifth of the diameter of the full Moon. Although this is comparatively large by the standard of Hubble's images, NGC 2366 is much too faint to observe with the naked eye.

ESA/Hubble Information Centre


Related Dwarf Galaxy Current Events and Dwarf Galaxy News Articles


Tiny, ancient galaxy preserves record of catastrophic event
The lightest few elements in the periodic table formed minutes after the Big Bang. Heavier chemical elements are created by stars, either from nuclear fusion in their interiors or in catastrophic explosions.

The Milky Way's clean and tidy galactic neighbor
IC 1613 is a dwarf galaxy in the constellation of Cetus (The Sea Monster). This VST image shows the galaxy's unconventional beauty, all scattered stars and bright pink gas, in great detail.

VLT revisits a curious cosmic collision
The spectacular aftermath of a 360 million year old cosmic collision is revealed in great detail in new images from ESO's Very Large Telescope at the Paranal Observatory.

Dark matter dominates in nearby dwarf galaxy
Dark matter is called "dark" for a good reason. Although they outnumber particles of regular matter by more than a factor of 10, particles of dark matter are elusive.

A shy galactic neighbor
The Sculptor Dwarf Galaxy, pictured in this new image from the Wide Field Imager camera, installed on the 2.2-metre MPG/ESO telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory, is a close neighbour of our galaxy, the Milky Way.

Astronomers discover how lowly dwarf galaxy becomes star-forming powerhouse
A nearby dwarf galaxy poses an intriguing mystery: How is it able to form brilliant star clusters without the dusty, gas-rich environments found in larger galaxies?

Detection of gamma rays from a newly discovered dwarf galaxy may point to dark matter
A newly discovered dwarf galaxy orbiting our own Milky Way has offered up a surprise -- it appears to be radiating gamma rays, according to an analysis by physicists at Carnegie Mellon, Brown, and Cambridge universities.

Dark Energy Survey finds more celestial neighbors
Scientists on the Dark Energy Survey, using one of the world's most powerful digital cameras, have discovered eight more faint celestial objects hovering near our Milky Way galaxy.

Nearby 'dwarf' galaxy is home to luminous star cluster
A team of Tel Aviv University and UCLA astronomers have discovered a remarkable cluster of more than a million young stars are forming in a hot, dusty cloud of molecular gases in a tiny galaxy very near our own.

More than a million stars are forming in a mysterious dusty gas cloud in a nearby galaxy
More than a million young stars are forming in a hot, dusty cloud of molecular gases in a tiny galaxy near our own, an international team of astronomers has discovered.
More Dwarf Galaxy Current Events and Dwarf Galaxy News Articles

Galaxies

Galaxies
by Seymour Simon (Author)


This close-up look at our own Milky Way and other enormous clusters of stars describes the many different types of galaxies, how they were formed, and how they got their different shapes. "A dazzling photo-essay."--School Library Journal.

Stellar Disk Evolution and Gaseous Disk Turbulence of Dwarf Irregular Galaxies (Springer Theses)

Stellar Disk Evolution and Gaseous Disk Turbulence of Dwarf Irregular Galaxies (Springer Theses)
by Hong-Xin Zhang (Author)


This book focuses on the stellar disk evolution and gas disk turbulence of the most numerous galaxies in the local Universe – the dwarf galaxies. The “outside-in” disk shrinking mode was established for a relatively large sample of dwarf galaxies for the first time, and this is in contrast to the “inside-out” disk growth mode found for spiral galaxies. Double exponential brightness profiles also correspond to double exponential stellar mass profiles for dwarf galaxies, which is again different from most spiral galaxies. The cool gas distribution in dwarf galaxies was probed with the spatial power spectra of hydrogen iodide (HI) gas emission, and provided indirect evidence that inner disks of dwarf galaxies have proportionally more cool gas than outer disks. The finding that no...

Beyond the Stars: At Galaxy's Edge: a space opera anthology (Volume 3)

Beyond the Stars: At Galaxy's Edge: a space opera anthology (Volume 3)
by Nick Webb (Author), Michael Anderle (Author), G. S. Jennsen (Author), Chris Fox (Author), E.E. Giorgi (Author), Adam Quinn (Author), Michael Ezell (Author), Caroline A. Gill (Author), Christopher J. Valin (Author), David Bruns (Author), Piers Platt (Author), Anthea Sharp (Author), Ellen Campbell (Editor), Patrice Fitzgerald (Editor), Jennifer Foehner Wells (Editor)


A dozen science fiction writers, including New York Times and USA Today bestselling authors, offer remarkable tales in this third collection of space opera stories presented under the Beyond the Stars banner. These twelve stories showcase strange new worlds, alien life forms, and deep space battles. Come with us to where the legends are born... at galaxy’s edge.

Pluto: A Dwarf Planet (Exploring the Galaxy)

Pluto: A Dwarf Planet (Exploring the Galaxy)
by Thomas K. Adamson (Author)


Pluto is now a dwarf planet. Learn more about the fascinating, cold world of Pluto.

Stars and Galaxies

Stars and Galaxies
by Michael A. Seeds (Author), Dana Backman (Author)


With this newly revised Ninth Edition of STARS AND GALAXIES, the authors' goals are to help you use astronomy to understand science--and use science to understand what we are. Fascinating, engaging, and visually vibrant, this text will help you answer two fundamental questions: What are we? And how do we know?

Galaxy: Mapping the Cosmos

Galaxy: Mapping the Cosmos
by James Geach (Author)


Each night, we are able to gaze up at the night sky and look at the thousands of stars that stretch to the end of our individual horizons. But the stars we see are only those that make up our own Milky Way galaxy—but one of hundreds of billions in the whole of the universe, each separated  by inconceivably huge tracts of empty space. In this book, astronomer James Geach tells the rich stories of both the evolution of galaxies and our ability to observe them, offering a fascinating history of how we’ve come to realize humanity’s tiny place in the vast universe.
           
Taking us on a compelling tour of the state-of-the-art science involved in mapping the infinite, Geach offers a first-hand account of both the science itself and how it is done, describing what...

Stars and Galaxies

Stars and Galaxies
by Michael A. Seeds (Author), Dana Backman (Author)


With this newly revised Eighth Edition of STARS AND GALAXIES, the authors' goals are to help you use astronomy to understand science--and use science to understand what we are. Fascinating, engaging, and visually vibrant, this text will help you answer two fundamental questions: What are we? And how do we know?

Pluto [Scholastic]: A Dwarf Planet (Exploring the Galaxy)

Pluto [Scholastic]: A Dwarf Planet (Exploring the Galaxy)
by Thomas K. Adamson (Author)


Book by Adamson, Thomas K.

Universe: Solar System, Stars, and Galaxies

Universe: Solar System, Stars, and Galaxies
by Michael A. Seeds (Author), Dana Backman (Author)


The new edition of UNIVERSE means the same proven Seeds/Backman approach and trusted content, fully updated with the latest discoveries and resources to meet the needs of today's diverse students. Available with InfoTrac Student Collections http://gocengage.com/infotrac.

Unlocking the Secrets of White Dwarf Stars (Astronomers' Universe)

Unlocking the Secrets of White Dwarf Stars (Astronomers' Universe)
by Hugh Van Horn (Author)


White dwarfs, each containing about as much mass as our Sun but packed into a volume about the size of Earth, are the endpoints of evolution for most stars. Thousands of these faint objects have now been discovered, though only a century ago only three were known. They are among the most common stars in the Milky Way Galaxy, and they have become important tools in understanding the universe. Yet a century ago only three white dwarfs were known.  The existence of these stars completely baffled the scientists of the day, and solving the mysteries of these strange objects required revolutionary advances in science and technology, including the development of quantum physics, the construction and utilization of large telescopes, the invention of the digital computer, and the ability to make...

© 2016 BrightSurf.com