Science Current Events | Science News | Brightsurf.com
 

'Mad Cow' blood test now on the horizon

September 12, 2012
A simple blood test for Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and Mad Cow disease is a step closer, following a breakthrough by medical researchers at the University of Melbourne.

Using newly available genetic sequencing scientists discovered cells infected with prions (the infectious agent responsible for these diseases) release particles which contain easily recognized 'signature genes'.

Associate Professor Andrew Hill - from the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Bio21 Institute - said these particles travel in the blood stream, making a diagnostic blood test a possibility.

"This might provide a way to screen people who have spent time in the UK, who currently face restrictions on their ability to donate blood," he said.

"With a simple blood test nurses could deem a prospective donor's blood as healthy, with the potential to significantly boost critical blood stocks."

Mad Cow disease was linked to the deaths of nearly 200 people in Great Britain who consumed meat from infected animals in the late 1980s.

Since 2000, the Australia Red Cross Blood Service has not accepted blood from anybody who lived in the UK for more than six months between 1980 and 1996, or who received a blood transfusion in the UK after 1980.

The research is published in this week's Oxford University Press Nucleic Acids Research journal.

Lead author Dr Shayne Bellingham said the breakthrough might also help detect other human neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

"This is an exciting new field where we can test for conditions in the brain and throughout the body, without being invasive," he said.

The researchers' genetic testing focused on a form of cell discharge called exosomes.

If exosomes were infected with prions (the pathogen that causes Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, commonly known as Mad Cow Disease) they were found to also carry a specific signature of small genes called microRNA's.

The research was undertaken at the University of Melbourne, with assistance from the Mental Health Research Institute of Victoria, the National Health and Medical Research Council and the Australian Research Council.

The University of Melbourne


Related Mad Cow Disease Current Events and Mad Cow Disease News Articles


Satellite telemetry tracks bearded vultures
The Pyrenees are home to continental Europe's only wild population of bearded vultures, a species classified as endangered in Spain. A study compiled by Spanish researchers reveals - in a level of detail hitherto unseen - the size of the home range of this bird species using satellite tracking technologies.

First successful vaccination against 'mad cow'-like wasting disease in deer
Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere say that a vaccination they have developed to fight a brain-based, wasting syndrome among deer and other animals may hold promise on two additional fronts: Protecting U.S. livestock from contracting the disease, and preventing similar brain infections in humans.

UTHealth researchers discover infectious prion protein in urine of patients with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
The misfolded and infectious prion protein that is a marker for variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease - linked to the consumption of infected cattle meat - has been detected in the urine of patients with the disease by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) Medical School.

Prion discovery could help keep deadly brain diseases in check
New research from David Westaway, PhD, of the University of Alberta and Jiri Safar, PhD, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has uncovered a quality control mechanism in brain cells that may help keep deadly neurological diseases in check for months or years.

Lasers might be the cure for brain diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden, together with researchers at the Polish Wroclaw University of Technology, have made a discovery that may lead to the curing of diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (the so called mad cow disease) through photo therapy.

Targeted culling of deer controls disease with little effect on hunting
Chronic wasting disease, the deer-equivalent of mad cow disease, has crept across the U.S. landscape from west to east. It appeared first in captive mule deer in Colorado in the late 1960s.

Researchers estimate 1 in 2,000 people in the UK carry variant CJD proteins
The survey provides the most robust prevalence measure to date - and identifies abnormal prion protein across a wider age group than found previously and in all genotypes.

Recombinant Human Prion Protein Inhibits Prion Propagation
Case Western Reserve University researchers today published findings that point to a promising discovery for the treatment and prevention of prion diseases, rare neurodegenerative disorders that are always fatal. The researchers discovered that recombinant human prion protein stops the propagation of prions, the infectious pathogens that cause the diseases.

Prion-like proteins drive several diseases of aging
Two leading neurology researchers have proposed a theory that could unify scientists' thinking about several neurodegenerative diseases and suggest therapeutic strategies to combat them.

The flexible tail of the prion protein poisons brain cells
Prion proteins are the infectious pathogens that cause Mad Cow Disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.
More Mad Cow Disease Current Events and Mad Cow Disease News Articles

How the Cows Turned Mad: Unlocking the Mysteries of Mad Cow Disease

How the Cows Turned Mad: Unlocking the Mysteries of Mad Cow Disease
by Maxime Schwartz (Author), Edward Schneider (Translator), Marion Nestle (Translator)


Fear of mad cow disease, a lethal illness transmitted from infected beef to humans, has spread from Europe to the United States and around the world. Originally published to much acclaim in France, this scientific thriller, available in English for the first time and updated with a new chapter on developments in 2001, tells of the hunt for the cause of an enigmatic class of fatal brain infections, of which mad cow disease is the latest incarnation. In gripping, nontechnical prose, Maxime Schwartz details the deadly manifestations of these diseases throughout history, describes the major players and events that led to discoveries about their true nature, and outlines our current state of knowledge. The book concludes by addressing the question we all want answered: should we be...

The Pathological Protein: Mad Cow, Chronic Wasting, and Other Deadly Prion Diseases

The Pathological Protein: Mad Cow, Chronic Wasting, and Other Deadly Prion Diseases
by Philip Yam (Author)


Prions are an entirely new class of pathogens, and scientists are just beginning to understand them. Although they have plagued humans and animals for 3 centuries, only in the last 2 decades have researchers linked them to diseases like Mad Cow. This book tells the strange story of their discovery, and the medical controversies that swirl around them. The author, Philip Yam, is a well-respected and connected journalist who is now an editor at Scientific American.

And the Good News Is...: Lessons and Advice from the Bright Side

And the Good News Is...: Lessons and Advice from the Bright Side
by Dana Perino (Author)


From her years as a presidential press secretary to her debates with colleagues on Fox News' The Five, Dana Perino reveals the lessons she's learned that have guided her through life, including stories from behind the scenes at the White House with President George W. Bush that the cameras never captured.

Thoughtful, inspiring and often surprising, AND THE GOOD NEWS IS... traces Dana's unlikely journey through politics, the White House, and television. She has an uncanny ability for knowing what to say and how best to say it. A recurring theme in AND THE GOOD NEWS IS...is that planning has never worked for Dana; every time she has made a plan, something unexpected-and often better-has happened.
AND THE GOOD NEWS IS... blends a candid self-portrait with advice for allowing one's...

Mad Cow Disease - Search Word Pro: Health Series (Search Word Pro - Health Series)

Mad Cow Disease - Search Word Pro: Health Series (Search Word Pro - Health Series)
by Direct Contact Publishing


Mad Cow Disease - Search Word Pro – Health Series

The goal of Search Word Pro is to help you improve your knowledge and success using the best and most current medical health and treatment information available. This is a very special personal tool designed to help you discover powerful and actionable information so you can make the best informed decisions.

The searches you can do here are specifically designed to help you uncover the best medical knowledge you can find online from the best sources and experts. The results of each search show you what the top experts are doing and saying. You then get to decide what you need and then focus on what works best for you.

Each Search Word Pro ebook offers a step by step search word roadmap on the...

Brain Trust: The Hidden Connection Between Mad Cow and Misdiagnosed Alzheimer's Disease

Brain Trust: The Hidden Connection Between Mad Cow and Misdiagnosed Alzheimer's Disease
by Colm A. Kelleher (Author)


On December 23, 2003 authorities announced that the first case of Mad Cow Disease in the United States had been found in a dairy cow in Mabton, Washington. The admission, though downplayed, hides a frightening reality. For thirty years, a covert sampling operation has been conducted on North American cattle to reveal how far the deadly prions that are thought to cause Mad Cow Disease have spread thought the nation's livestock. These efforts may be too late: BRAIN TRUST warns of an impending public health catastrophe as the American food supply, and other countries to which they export, becomes progressively more contaminated. Although statistics argue that only one in a million people become affected with the human version of Mad Cow Disease, research on many postmortem brains of...

MAD COWBOY: Plain Truth from the Cattle Rancher Who Won't Eat Meat

MAD COWBOY: Plain Truth from the Cattle Rancher Who Won't Eat Meat
by Howard F. Lyman (Author), Glen Merzer (Author)


Told by the man who kicked off the infamous lawsuit between Oprah and the cattlemen, Mad Cowboy is an impassioned account of the highly dangerous practices of the cattle and dairy industries.

Howard Lyman's testimony on The Oprah Winfrey Show revealed the deadly impact of the livestock industry on our well-being. It not only led to Oprah's declaration that she'd never eat a burger again, it sent shock waves through a concerned and vulnerable public.

A fourth-generation Montana rancher, Lyman investigated the use of chemicals in agriculture after developing a spinal tumor that nearly paralyzed him. Now a vegetarian, he blasts through the propaganda of beef and dairy interests -- and the government agencies that protect them -- to expose an animal-based diet as the primary...

Mad Cow Disease: Webster's Timeline History, 1986 - 2007

Mad Cow Disease: Webster's Timeline History, 1986 - 2007
by Icon Group International (Author)


Webster's bibliographic and event-based timelines are comprehensive in scope, covering virtually all topics, geographic locations and people. They do so from a linguistic point of view, and in the case of this book, the focus is on "Mad Cow Disease," including when used in literature (e.g. all authors that might have Mad Cow Disease in their name). As such, this book represents the largest compilation of timeline events associated with Mad Cow Disease when it is used in proper noun form. Webster's timelines cover bibliographic citations, patented inventions, as well as non-conventional and alternative meanings which capture ambiguities in usage. These furthermore cover all parts of speech (possessive, institutional usage, geographic usage) and contexts, including pop culture, the arts,...

Mad Cow Disease and U.S. Beef Trade

Mad Cow Disease and U.S. Beef Trade
by Congressional Research Service


The 110th Congress is expected to monitor closely U.S. efforts to regain foreign markets that banned U.S. beef when a cow in Washington state tested positive for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, or mad cow disease) in December 2003. Rebuilding foreign confidence in the safety of U.S. beef and cattle has been impeded by two other confirmed U.S. cases of BSE, announced June 2005 and March 2006. The four major U.S. beef export markets, Canada, Mexico, Japan, and Korea, are again accepting U.S. product. Resumption of beef trade with Japan and Korea has not gone smoothly. Japan temporarily suspended all U.S. exports when prohibited materials were discovered in a shipment, but trade has now resumed. Korea rejected some shipments with bone fragments, but has not prohibited all export...

The Cow

The Cow
by Ariana Reines (Author)


This text is filthy and fertilized, filling and emptying, filling and emptying, atrocious and politic with meaning. The Cow is a mother, a lover, and a murdered lump of meat, rendered in the strongest of languages. "I cannot count the altering that happens in the very large rooms that are the guts of her."

No More Bull!: The Mad Cowboy Targets America's Worst Enemy: Our Diet

No More Bull!: The Mad Cowboy Targets America's Worst Enemy: Our Diet
by Howard F. Lyman (Author), Glen Merzer (Author), Joanna Samorow-Merzer (Author)


In 1996, when Howard Lyman warned America on The Oprah Winfrey Show that Mad Cow Disease was coming to America, offended cattlemen sued him and Oprah both. Not only were Lyman and Oprah vindicated in court, but events have proved many of Lyman's predictions absolutely right. Mad Cow Disease has come to America, and Lyman argues persuasively in No More Bull! that the problem will only grow more deadly until our government deals with it seriously.
In Mad Cowboy, Lyman, a fourth-generation Montana rancher turned vegetarian then vegan, told the story of his personal transformation after a spinal tumor, which he believes was caused by agricultural chemicals, nearly left him paralyzed. In No More Bull!, Lyman uses his humor, compassion, firsthand experience in agriculture, and command of...

© 2015 BrightSurf.com