Science Current Events | Science News | Brightsurf.com

 
corner top left block corner top right

Top Science News Articles this Month | Science Current Events  RSS Feed

The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past month
See Also:Top Science New Articles from the Past 7 Days

Earlier intervention leads to better weight recovery in children with multiple risk factors for weight faltering
Young children who are underweight experienced greater weight recovery the earlier an intervention was started, and the recovery was more significant in children with multiple household risk factors, according to a study published this week in The Journal of Pediatrics.

Climate change altering Greenland ice sheet and accelerating sea level rise, says York University professor
The Greenland ice sheet has traditionally been pictured as a bit of a sponge for glacier meltwater, but new research has found it is rapidly losing the ability to buffer its contribution to rising sea levels, says a York University researcher.



E-cigarettes deliver sufficient nicotine to suppress smoking desire and reduce tobacco withdrawal symptoms in smokers, comparable to Nicorette
A new study, published in the Journal of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, found that e-cigarettes share a similar short-term safety profile as NicoretteĀ® products and are comparable in reducing tobacco withdrawal symptoms.

NREL research advances hydrogen production efforts
Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have made advances toward affordable photoelectrochemical (PEC) production of hydrogen.

'Freak' ocean waves hit without warning, new research shows
Mariners have long spoken of 'walls of water' appearing from nowhere in the open seas. But oceanographers have generally disregarded such stories and suggested that rogue waves - enormous surface waves that have attained a near-mythical status over the centuries - build up gradually and have relatively narrow crests.

Fracking plays active role in generating toxic metal wastewater, Dartmouth study finds
The production of hazardous wastewater in hydraulic fracturing is assumed to be partly due to chemicals introduced into injected freshwater when it mixes with highly saline brine naturally present in the rock. But a Dartmouth study investigating the toxic metal barium in fracking wastewater finds that chemical reactions between injected freshwater and the fractured shale itself could play a major role.

First serotonin neurons made from human stem cells
Su-Chun Zhang, a pioneer in developing neurons from stem cells at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has created a specialized nerve cell that makes serotonin, a signaling chemical with a broad role in the brain.

New study zeros in on plate tectonics' start date
Earth has some special features that set it apart from its close cousins in the solar system, including large oceans of liquid water and a rich atmosphere with just the right ingredients to support life as we know it.

Poverty may increase childhood risk of neurological impairment, NIH study suggests
Children from low income environments appear to have a higher risk of neurological impairment than those from more economically secure circumstances, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions.

Brain regions of PTSD patients show differences during fear responses
Regions of the brain function differently among people with post-traumatic stress disorder, causing them to generalize non-threatening events as if they were the original trauma, according to new research from Duke Medicine and the Durham VA Medical Center.

Greenhouse gas emissions from freshwater higher than thought
Do not underestimate the babbling brook. When it comes to greenhouse gases, these bucolic water bodies have the potential to create a lot of hot air.

Electric patch holds promise for treating PTSD
An average of 30 years had passed since the traumatic events that had left them depressed, anxious, irritable, hypervigilant, unable to sleep well and prone to nightmares.

For breast cancer patients, never too late to quit smoking
Documenting that it's never too late to quit smoking, a large study of breast cancer survivors has found that those who quit smoking after their diagnosis had a 33 percent lower risk of death as a result of breast cancer than those who continued to smoke.

Shingles increases short-term risk of stroke in older adults
More than 95% of the world's adult population is infected with the virus that causes chickenpox.

Evolutionary clock ticks for snowshoe hares facing climate change
Snowshoe hares that camouflage themselves by changing their coats from brown in summer to white in winter face serious threats from climate change, and it's uncertain whether hare populations will be able to adapt in time, according to a North Carolina State University study.

In pursuit of HIV vaccine, TSRI scientists shed light on antibody origins
From Peter Parker's fateful spider bite to Arthur pulling the sword from the stone at the beginning of his reign--everyone likes to know a hero's origin story.

Warmer air and sea, declining ice continue to trigger Arctic change
A new NOAA-sponsored report shows that air temperature in 2015 across the Arctic was well above average with temperature anomalies over land more than 2 degrees Fahrenheit above average, the highest since records began in 1900.

'Hydricity' concept uses solar energy to produce power round-the-clock
Researchers are proposing a new "hydricity" concept aimed at creating a sustainable economy by not only generating electricity with solar energy but also producing and storing hydrogen from superheated water for round-the-clock power production.

Shingles vaccine helps protect older patients with end-stage renal disease
Elderly patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who received the shingles vaccine were half as likely to develop shingles compared to those who were not vaccinated.

Active and passive smoking linked to infertility and earlier menopause
Active and passive smoking are linked to infertility problems and a hastening of the natural menopause before the age of 50, finds a large study published online in the journal Tobacco Control.

A new spin on star-forming galaxies
Australian researchers have discovered why some galaxies are "clumpy" rather than spiral in shape--and it appears low spin is to blame.

Elevated testosterone levels may raise risk of uterine fibroids
Women who have high levels of both testosterone and estrogen in midlife may face a greater risk of developing benign tumors on the uterus called uterine fibroids than women with low levels of the hormones, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Fossils enrich our understanding of evolution
Our understanding of evolution can be enriched by adding fossil species to analyses of living animals, as shown by scientists from the University of Bristol.

Researchers elucidate network of genes that control when puberty begins
In expanding our knowledge of how the brain controls the process of sexual development, researchers at Oregon Healthy & Science University and the University of Pittsburgh have identified for the first time members of an elaborate superfamily of genes that regulate the timing of puberty in highly evolved nonhuman primates.

Ambitious women must use their social capital to reach top jobs
Aspirational professional women would benefit from a better understanding of how to build, maintain and use their social capital to succeed in reaching the top.

Scientists take steps to make weak TB drugs strong again
Biophysicists have discovered why the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB) are naturally somewhat resistant to antibiotics known as fluoroquinolones.

Gamma rays from distant galaxy tell story of an escape
A flare of very high-energy gamma rays emitted from a galaxy halfway across the universe has put new bounds on the amount of background light in the universe and given astrophysicists clues to how and where such gamma rays are produced.

Study: Eliminating cost for colorectal cancer screening doesn't improve screening rates
Making colonoscopy available at no cost to eligible Medicare beneficiaries under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) did not increase the number of people in this target population who regularly undergo the procedure, says a new large scale national study from University Hospitals Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center.

Treatment strategy protects children who receive liver transplants from hepatitis b-infected donors
Researchers have found that a prophylaxis treatment can prevent new-onset hepatitis B in children who receive liver transplants from donors who were previously infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) but had successfully cleared the virus.

Predators key to helping prey evolve with climate change
The key to helping animals evolve quickly in response to climate change could actually be their predators, according to a new UBC study.

Explosive underwater volcanoes were a major feature of 'Snowball Earth'
Around 720-640 million years ago, much of the Earth's surface was covered in ice during a glaciation that lasted millions of years. Explosive underwater volcanoes were a major feature of this 'Snowball Earth', according to new research led by the University of Southampton.

USF geologists focus on mineral for clues to beginning of biological life on earth
On the early Earth, light came not only from the sun but also from the incessant bombardment of fireball meteorites continually striking the planet.

Pill that targets gut receptor treats fatty liver disease, obesity in mice
A bile acid that can turn off a receptor in the gut has prevented and reversed fatty liver disease in mice, according to an international team of researchers. The compound may help treat certain metabolic disorders, such as Type 2 diabetes and obesity, as well.

Baby fish will be lost at sea in acidified oceans
The ability of baby fish to find a home, or other safe haven, to grow into adulthood will be severely impacted under predicted ocean acidification, University of Adelaide research has found.

CTE is confirmed as a unique disease that can be definitively diagnosed
For the first time, CTE has been confirmed as a unique disease that can be definitively diagnosed by neuropathological examination of brain tissue.

Let go my info: People are info-egoists when it comes to their privacy
People are much more concerned about sharing their own private information with third-party app developers than they are about revealing their friends' data, according to Penn State researchers.

Brain formation pattern shows why early trauma may leave no clues
Some of the earliest nerve cells to develop in the womb shape brain circuits that process sights and sounds, but then give way to mature networks that convert this sensory information into thoughts.

Helping children at high risk for aggressive behavior found to have long-term benefits
A new longitudinal study that examined an intervention for children at high risk of developing behavior problems has found that teaching so-called soft skills was key to preventing criminal and delinquent problems later in life.

Novel imaging technique captures beauty of metal-labeled neurons in 3-D
Researchers have discovered a dazzling new method of visualizing neurons that promises to benefit neuroscientists and cell biologists alike: by using spectral confocal microscopy to image tissues impregnated with silver or gold.

Three miles high: Using drones to study high-altitude glaciers
While some dream of the day that aerial drones deliver their online purchases, scientists are using the technology today to deliver data that was never available before.

East Antarctic Ice Sheet has stayed frozen for 14 million years, Penn team reports
Antarctica was once a balmier place, lush with plants and lakes. Figuring out just how long the continent has been a barren, cold desert of ice can give clues as to how Antarctica responded to the effects of past climates and can perhaps also indicate what to expect there in the future as Earth's atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide grows.

How recurrent strep A infections affect the brain
Researchers have discovered how immune cells triggered by recurrent Strep A infections enter the brain, causing inflammation that may lead to autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders in children.

India and Pakistan set to benefit from new autism treatment
In a world first, clinical researchers from the Universities of Liverpool and Manchester have collaborated with colleagues in south Asia to adapt a parent-led autism therapy.

Social stress: Brain circuitry fails to connect in children with autism
The holidays can be difficult for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), particularly because of new or different social situations.

Inside the hepatitis C virus is a promising antiviral
A peptide derived from the hepatitis C virus (HCV) kills a broad range of viruses while leaving host cells unharmed by discriminating between the molecular make-up of their membranes, reveals a study published January 5 in the Biophysical Journal.

UTA examines motivations behind adult learners' engineering degree pursuit
Students who transfer from a community college to an engineering program at a four-year university often do so because they are motivated to solve problems and understand how things work.

Study finds that aging warps our perception of time
Much like trying to watch a video with the audio out of synch, older adults may have difficulty combining the stimuli they see and hear, and it could have implications for rapid decision-making tasks such as driving, according to new research.

The eyes have it: Mutual gaze potentially a vital component in social interactions
A person in love gazes longingly and attentively at the object of his or her desire. When we want to grab another person's attention, we look directly into their eyes. Why do we behave this way? What happens during our gazing?

Twin study estimates familial risks of 23 different cancers
A large new study of twins has found that having a twin sibling diagnosed with cancer poses an excess risk for the other twin to develop any form of cancer.

Traveling salesman uncorks synthetic biology bottleneck
Researchers have created a computer program that will open a challenging field in synthetic biology to the entire world.

[ Science News Archive ]
corner bottom left corner bottom right
© 2016 BrightSurf.com