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The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past month
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Brivaracetam in epilepsy: Added benefit not proven
Brivaracetam (trade name: Briviact) has been approved since January 2016 as add-on therapy for adolescents from the age of 16 years and adults with epileptic seizures.

Differences in metabolism between androgen-dependent and castration resistant prostate cancer may lead to new therapies
Advanced prostate cancer is usually treated by removing androgen, the male hormone that helps it grow.



Curious new bush species growing 'bleeding' fruits named by a US class of 150 7th graders
A class of 150 US 7th graders has helped select a name for a newly discovered plant, which amazes with its fruits that appear to be bleeding once they are cut open.

Algorithm could help detect and reduce power grid faults
The power grid is aging, overburdened and seeing more faults than ever, according to many. Any of those breaks could easily lead to prolonged power outages or even equipment damage.

Atmospheric aerosols can significantly cool down climate
It is possible to significantly slow down and even temporarily stop the progression of global warming by increasing the atmospheric aerosol concentration, shows a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. However, climate engineering does not remove the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

US may be greatly undercounting pediatric concussions
New research from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) highlights a substantial gap in how the United States currently estimates the nation's burden of pediatric concussions.

Large global range of prices for hepatitis C medicines raises concerns about affordability
The prices and affordability of recently developed and highly effective direct-acting antivirals for treating hepatitis C (HCV) vary greatly among countries worldwide.

Female smokers more likely to kick the habit by 'timing' their quit date with their menstrual cycle
Women who want to quit smoking may have better success by carefully timing their quit date with optimal days within their menstrual cycle, according to a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Improving cell transplantation after spinal cord injury: When, where and how?
Spinal cord injuries are mostly caused by trauma, often incurred in road traffic or sporting incidents, often with devastating and irreversible consequences, and unfortunately having a relatively high prevalence (250,000 patients in the USA; 80% of cases are male).

PNNL helps lead national microbiome initiative
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are playing a central role as the nation devotes more than $500 million to understand communities of microorganisms and their role in climate science, food production and human health.

Better combustion for power generation
In the United States, the use of natural gas for electricity generation continues to grow. The driving forces behind this development?

New blood test for the detection of bovine TB
A new blood test to detect Mycobacteria in blood has been developed by a team at The University of Nottingham led by Dr Cath Rees, an expert in microbiology in the School of Biosciences and Dr Ben Swift from the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science.

Hormone may offer new approach to type 2 diabetes
Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and Oxford University have found a hormone that may offer an effective treatment for type 2 diabetes.

Hydrothermal vents, methane seeps play enormous role in marine life, global climate
The hydrothermal vents and methane seeps on the ocean floor that were once thought to be geologic and biological oddities are now emerging as a major force in ocean ecosystems, marine life and global climate.

Does obesity lead to more nursing home admission and a lower quality of care?
In a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, researchers examined the care that obese older adults receive when they are admitted to nursing homes.

Autism care improved, diagnosis time shortened by new MU program
Wait lists for a specialist to confirm an autism diagnosis can be agonizing and last months. As the prevalence of autism and autism spectrum disorders increase, so does the demand for a health care system that is fully equipped to respond to the complex needs associated with autism.

New research from Yale and MIT describes bioreactor to support whole lung regeneration
An innovative mechanical system that mimics the ventilation and blood flow in the chest cavity, housed in a specialized, sterile bioreactor, can support the growth of engineered whole lungs at human scale.

In obese prostate cancer patients, robotic surgery reduces risk of blood loss
In obese prostate cancer patients, robotic-assisted surgery to remove the prostate reduces the risk of blood loss and prolonged hospital stays, a Loyola Medicine study has found.

High levels of protein p62 predict liver cancer recurrence
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have discovered that high levels of the protein p62 in human liver samples are strongly associated with cancer recurrence and reduced patient survival. In mice, they also found that p62 is required for liver cancer to form.

Space mission first to observe key interaction between magnetic fields of Earth and sun
Most people do not give much thought to the Earth's magnetic field, yet it is every bit as essential to life as air, water and sunlight.

The mysterious sexual life of the most primitive dragonfly
The dragonfly considered the most primitive in the world lives in Australia and Tasmania, and was believed to be extinct four decades ago.

Vicious circle of platelets
They were published in the current issue of the renowned journal "Science Signaling". The scientists provide evidence for the first time that treatment of Alzheimer transgenic model mice with an anti-platelet drug leads to significantly reduced amyloid plaques in cerebral vessels.

'On-the-fly' 3-D print system prints what you design, as you design it
3-D printing has become a powerful tool for engineers and designers, allowing them to do "rapid prototyping" by creating a physical copy of a proposed design.

Research discovers mechanism that causes cancer cells to escape from the immune system
Under normal circumstances, the immune system recognizes and successfully fights cancer cells, eliminating them as they develop.

36,000 children already tested for early type 1 diabetes
One year after the introduction of the Bavarian pilot project Fr1da, the Institute of Diabetes Research, Helmholtz Zentrum M√ľnchen has published the first results in the BMJ Open journal.

A tool to support public health decisions on Zika virus predicts most planned interventions to be cost-effective
A study published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases presents a cost-effectiveness tool that can help guide decisions regarding resource allocation to fund interventions targeted at curtailing the ongoing Zika virus outbreak.

Kids' eating habits highlight need for healthier lunchboxes
New research from the University of Adelaide in Australia shows children aged 9-10 years old are receiving almost half of their daily energy requirements from "discretionary" or junk foods.

Ancient anti-inflammatory drug salicylic acid has cancer-fighting properties
Scientists from the Gladstone Institutes have identified a new pathway by which salicylic acid--a key compound in the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs aspirin and diflunisal--stops inflammation and cancer.

Tiny probe could produce big improvements in batteries and fuel cells
A team of American and Chinese researchers has developed a new tool that could aid in the quest for better batteries and fuel cells.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy may help reduce memory problems in cancer survivors who have received chemotherapy
A new analysis indicates that a type of psychotherapy delivered by videoconference may help prevent some of the long-term memory issues caused by chemotherapy.

New class of protein could treat cancer and other diseases, study finds
A protein designed by researchers at Georgia State University can effectively target a cell surface receptor linked to a number of diseases, showing potential as a therapeutic treatment for an array of illnesses, including cancer, according to the research team.

Nearly half of heart bypass patients skip medications that keep blood flowing
Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University discovered that nearly half of coronary artery bypass patients are not taking statins and aspirin together when they are referred for diagnostic cardiac catheterization at least three years after their initial bypass.

Ecologists advise an increase in prescribed grassland burning to maintain ecosystem
Kansas State University researchers have found a three-year absence of fire is the tipping point for the tallgrass prairie ecosystem and advise an increase in burning.

Exercise, future anticancer therapy?
At age 70, Alfred Roberts plays hockey twice a week. Nothing special, right? Except that for three years he has had advanced prostate cancer, which has spread to his bones.

Transplanted nerve cells survive a quarter of a century in a Parkinson's disease patient
In the late 1980s and over the 1990s, researchers at Lund University in Sweden pioneered the transplantation of new nerve cells into the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease.

A guide to CRISPR gene activation
The CRISPR-Cas9 system has come to be known as the quintessential tool that allows researchers to edit the DNA sequences of many organisms and cell types.

Tiny wasp sniffs out, picks up 'good vibrations' to battle ash borer
With the emerald ash borer beetle devastating ash tree populations throughout the United States -- from locations as far north as Massachusetts and as far south as Louisiana -- solutions to help fight the insect are critical.

Study show female heart patients less likely to get blood thinning therapy
Female atrial fibrillation patients are less likely than their male counterparts to receive blood thinning therapies to prevent stroke, say University of Cincinnati College of Medicine researchers.

A global early warning system for infectious diseases
In the recent issue of EMBO reports, Barbara Han of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies and John Drake of the University of Georgia Odum School of Ecology call for the creation of a global early warning system for infectious diseases.

Amid terror threats, new hope for radiation antidote
University of Virginia School of Medicine researchers have identified promising drugs that could lead to the first antidote for radiation exposure that might result from a dirty bomb terror attack or a nuclear accident such as Chernobyl.

Tobacco smoke makes germs more resilient
The mouth is one of the "dirtiest" parts of the body, home to millions of germs. But puffing cigarettes can increase the likelihood that certain bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis will not only set up camp but will build a fortified city in the mouth and fight against the immune system.

Hunting for the brain's opioid addiction switch
New research by Steven Laviolette's research team at Western University is contributing to a better understanding of the ways opiate-class drugs modify brain circuits to drive the addiction cycle.

Seeking to rewind mammalian extinction
In December 2015 an international group of scientists convened in Austria to discuss the imminent extinction of the northern white rhinoceros and the possibility of bringing the species back from brink of extinction.

Mapping neural networks to strengthen circadian rhythms
If you've ever felt groggy the morning after traversing time zones, you can thank the temporary mismatch between your body's 24-hour circadian rhythm and your new local time.

Coastal birds rely on tides and moon phases
Coastal wading birds shape their lives around the tides, and new research in The Auk: Ornithological Advances shows that different species respond differently to shifting patterns of high and low water according to their size and daily schedules, even following prey cycles tied to the phases of the moon.

Why everyone wants to help the sick -- but not the unemployed
New research from Aarhus BSS at Aarhus University explains why healthcare costs are running out of control, while costs to unemployment protection are kept in line.

Study suggests medical errors now third leading cause of death in the US
Analyzing medical death rate data over an eight-year period, Johns Hopkins patient safety experts have calculated that more than 250,000 deaths per year are due to medical error in the U.S.

Protein may predict response to immunotherapy in patients with metastatic melanoma
A protein called Bim may hold the clue to which patients may be successful on immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma, according to the results of a study by Mayo Clinic researchers led by senior author Haidong Dong, M.D., Ph.D., and published online in the May 5 edition of JCI Insight.

US Army camera captures explosives in fine detail
When the script of Lawrence of Arabia called for wrecking a train, director David Lean found it easiest to go ahead and wreck a train, orchestrating and filming it with expert precision.

Shifting bird distribution indicates a changing Arctic
Shifts in the distribution of Spectacled Eiders, a predatory bird at the top of the Bering Sea's benthic food web, indicate possible changes in the Arctic's marine ecosystem, according to new research in The Condor: Ornithological Applications.

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