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The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past month
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China looks to science and technology to fuel its economy
Maintaining stability in the face of rapid change and growth, and proactively partaking in cooperative global ties in science and technology fields will be key in helping China become an innovation-based economy, according to Denis Simon, vice provost for International Strategic Initiatives at Arizona State University.

Mode of action of new multiple sclerosis drug discovered
Just a few short weeks ago, dimethyl fumarate was approved in Europe as a basic therapy for multiple sclerosis.



Moth study suggests hidden climate change impacts
A 32-year study of subarctic forest moths in Finnish Lapland suggests that scientists may be underestimating the impacts of climate change on animals and plants because much of the harm is hidden from view.

Beneficial organisms react differently to parasite drug
The substance ivermectin has been used for more than thirty years all over the world to combat parasites like roundworms, lice and mites in humans, livestock and pets.

Americans using more energy according to Lawrence Livermore analysis
Americans used more renewable, fossil and even nuclear energy in 2013, according to the most recent energy flow charts released by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

First Earth-Size Planet Is Discovered in Another Star's 'habitable zone'
A team of astronomers that includes Penn State scientists has discovered the first Earth-size planet orbiting a star in the "habitable zone" -- the distance from a star where liquid water might pool on the surface of an orbiting planet.

ATHENA desktop human 'body' could reduce need for animal drug tests
Creating surrogate human organs, coupled with insights from highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies, a new project is on the brink of revolutionizing the way we screen new drugs and toxic agents.

Energy breakthrough uses sun to create solar energy materials
In a recent advance in solar energy, researchers have discovered a way to tap the sun not only as a source of power, but also to directly produce the solar energy materials that make this possible.

Parental addictions associated with adult children's arthritis
The adult offspring of parents who were addicted to drugs or alcohol are more likely to have arthritis, according to a new study by University of Toronto researchers.

Hummingbird evolution soared after they invaded South America 22 million years ago
A newly constructed family tree of the hummingbirds, published today in the journal Current Biology, tells a story of a unique group of birds that originated in Europe, passed through Asia and North America, and ultimately found its Garden of Eden in South America 22 million years ago.

Renewable energy market share climbs despite 2013 dip in investments
Renewable energy's share of world electricity generation continued its steady climb last year despite a 14 per cent drop in investments to US$214.4 billion, according to a new report released today.

La Brea Tar Pit fossil research shows climate change drove evolution of Ice Age predators
Concerns about climate change and its impact on the world around us are growing daily.

Pulmonary Hypertension Deaths Have Increased According to CDC Report in the Journal CHEST
Deaths from pulmonary hypertension have increased over the past decade, according to a study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Combining cell replication blocker with common cancer drug kills resistant tumor cells
Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), a partner with UPMC CancerCenter, have found that an agent that inhibits mitochondrial division can overcome tumor cell resistance to a commonly used cancer drug, and that the combination of the two induces rapid and synergistic cell death.

Study recalculates cost of combination vaccines
One of the most popular vaccine brands for children may not be the most cost-effective choice.

Cancer researchers find key protein link
A new understanding of proteins at the nexus of a cell's decision to survive or die has implications for researchers who study cancer and age-related diseases, according to biophysicists at the Rice University-based Center for Theoretical Biological Physics (CTBP).

Plant-derived anti-cancer compounds explained at national conference
Compounds derived from plant-based sources - including garlic, broccoli and medicine plants - confer protective effects against breast cancer, explain researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), partner with the UPMC CancerCenter.

Ancient volcanic explosions shed light on Mercury's origins
Mercury was long thought to be lacking volatile compounds that cause explosive volcanism. That view started to change when the MESSENGER spacecraft returned pictures of pyroclastic deposits - the telltale signature of volcanic explosions.

Common breast cancer subtype may benefit from personalized treatment approach
The second-most common type of breast cancer is a very different disease than the most common and appears to be a good candidate for a personalized approach to treatment.

Swedish researchers show impact of long-term vitamin D insufficiency on fracture risk
A study presented today at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases shows that long-term low levels of vitamin D intake are associated with higher 10-year fracture risk in elderly women.

Jamming a protein signal forces cancer cells to devour themselves
Under stress from chemotherapy or radiation, some cancer cells dodge death by consuming a bit of themselves, allowing them to essentially sleep through treatment and later awaken as tougher, resistant disease.

Report reveals adoption breakdown rate and the experiences of adoptive families in crisis
The most comprehensive study ever to be carried out into adoption in England has confirmed that the rate of breakdown is lower than anticipated, but it also reveals a stark picture of the problems faced by families.

Gout Isn't Always Easy to Prove: CT Scans Help Catch Cases Traditional Test Misses
Gout is on the rise among U.S. men and women, and this piercingly painful and most common form of inflammatory arthritis is turning out to be more complicated than had been thought.

GW Researcher Invents 'Mini Heart' to Help Return Venous Blood
George Washington University (GW) researcher Narine Sarvazyan, Ph.D., has invented a new organ to help return blood flow from veins lacking functional valves.

Increased risk of developing lung cancer after radiotherapy for breast cancer
Women who have radiotherapy for breast cancer have a small but significantly increased risk of subsequently developing a primary lung tumour, and now research has shown that this risk increases with the amount of radiation absorbed by the tissue.

New model shows moderate resource use & reduced economic inequality keys to sustainability
A new analytical tool adds human factors to a widely-used biological model of how animal populations interact, suggesting that human societies can reach a steady state that is sustainable when they do not over-deplete natural resources and avoid extreme economic inequality.

Immune cell 'defenders' could beat invading bacteria
An international team of scientists has identified the precise biochemical key that wakes up the body's immune cells and sends them into action against invading bacteria and fungi.

Study Shows Promise of Preserving Fertility in Boys with Cancer
Scientists have moved a step closer to being able to preserve fertility in young boys who undergo chemotherapy and radiation treatments for cancer.

Diamonds are an oil's best friend
A mixture of diamond nanoparticles and mineral oil easily outperforms other types of fluid created for heat-transfer applications, according to new research by Rice University.

Frozen in time: Three-million-year-old landscape still exists beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet
Some of the landscape underlying the massive Greenland ice sheet may have been undisturbed for almost 3 million years, ever since the island became completely ice-covered, according to researchers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Identified epigenetic factors associated with an increased risk of developing cancer
In 10% of human tumors there is a family history of hereditary disease associated with mutations in identified genes.

Gene may predict if further cancer treatments are needed
UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers are developing a new predictive tool that could help patients with breast cancer and certain lung cancers decide whether follow-up treatments are likely to help.

Adult cancer drugs show promise against an aggressive childhood brain tumor
The quest to improve survival of children with a high-risk brain tumor has led St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators to two drugs already used to treat adults with breast, pancreatic, lung and other cancers.

Study shows more than half of high-risk alcohol users report improvement after surgery
Much has been reported about the potential for increased risk of alcohol misuse after weight loss surgery (WLS), with most theories pointing to lower alcohol tolerance and a longer time to return to a sober state after surgery.

Researchers at IRB discover a key regulator of colon cancer
A team headed by Angel R. Nebreda at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB) identifies a dual role of the p38 protein in colon cancer.

Bacterial Gut Biome May Guide Colon Cancer Progression
Colorectal cancer develops in what is probably the most complex environment in the human body, a place where human cells cohabitate with a colony of approximately 10 trillion bacteria, most of which are unknown.

Caffeine against Alzheimer's disease
As part of a German-French research project, a team led by Dr. Christa E. Müller from the University of Bonn and Dr. David Blum from the University of Lille was able to demonstrate for the first time that caffeine has a positive effect on tau deposits in Alzheimer's disease.

Researchers probe the next generation of 2-D materials
As the properties and applications of graphene continue to be explored in laboratories all over the world, a growing number of researchers are looking beyond the one-atom-thick layer of carbon for alternative materials that exhibit similarly captivating properties.

Graphic photos on tobacco packs save lives: WHO report
Large, graphic health warnings on tobacco packets in China would increase awareness about the harms of smoking, help to cut smoking rates, and in doing so save lives according to global studies.

Making dams safer for fish around the world
Think of the pressure change you feel when an elevator zips you up multiple floors in a tall building. Imagine how you'd feel if that elevator carried you all the way up to the top of Mt. Everest - in the blink of an eye.

A more potent greenhouse gas than CO2, methane emissions will leap as Earth warms
While carbon dioxide is typically painted as the bad boy of greenhouse gases, methane is roughly 30 times more potent as a heat-trapping gas.

Scientists say new computer model amounts to a lot more than a hill of beans
Crops that produce more while using less water seem like a dream for a world with a burgeoning population and already strained food and water resources.

Expanding energy access key to solving global challenges
Giving the poor access to reliable modern energy offers a better route to address global challenges, climate and energy, scholars say in a new report, Our High-Energy Planet.

Study shows invasive species in waterways on rise due to climate change
One of the most serious threats to global biodiversity and the leisure and tourism industries is set to increase with climate change according to new research by Queen's University Belfast.

A Protein Could Be a Key Weapon in the Battle of the Bulge
More than one-third of people in the US are obese. Obesity and its related health problems-including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, insulin resistance, and belly fat-affect so many, yet effective treatments are very few.

Taking action to deliver agriculture growth, jobs, food security in face of climate change
The influential Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, released this week, concluded that climate change is already damaging food production and increasing food prices, and will have further impacts in the future.

Which couples who meet on social networking sites are most likely to marry?
Nearly 7% of Americans married between 2005-2012 met on social networking sites.

Friedreich's ataxia -- an effective gene therapy in an animal model
The transfer, via a viral vector, of a normal copy of the gene deficient in patients, allowed to fully and very rapidly cure the heart disease in mice.

Breakthrough therapy allows 4 paraplegic men to voluntarily move their legs
Four young men who have been paralyzed for years achieved groundbreaking progress - moving their legs - as a result of epidural electrical stimulation of the spinal cord, an international team of life scientists reports today in the medical journal Brain.

BU researchers identify specific causes of brown fat cell 'whitening'
Boston University researchers have learned new information about the consequences of overeating high-calorie foods.

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