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The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past month
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NC State researchers create 'nanofiber gusher'
Creating large amounts of polymer nanofibers dispersed in liquid is a challenge that has vexed researchers for years. But engineers and researchers at North Carolina State University and one of its start-up companies have now reported a method that can produce unprecedented amounts of polymer nanofibers, which have potential applications in filtration, batteries and cell scaffolding.

Medical expansion has led people worldwide to feel less healthy
Across much of the Western world, 25 years of expansion of the medical system has actually led to people feeling less healthy over time, a new study has found.



World Heritage Sites risk collapse without stronger local management
Without better local management, the world's most iconic ecosystems are at risk of collapse under climate change, say researchers in Science.

Kessler Foundation scientists link emotional processing deficits with white matter damage
Kessler Foundation researchers have linked the inability to recognize facial affect (emotion) with white matter damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI), an important first step toward understanding this emotional processing deficit.

New MIND diet may significantly protect against Alzheimer's disease
A new diet, appropriately known by the acronym MIND, could significantly lower a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, even if the diet is not meticulously followed, according to a paper published online for subscribers in March in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association.

Microscope technique reveals for first time when and where proteins are made
Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and their international collaborators have developed a novel fluorescence microscopy technique that for the first time shows where and when proteins are produced.

Renewables re-energized: Green energy investments worldwide surge 17 percent to $270 billion in 2014 (UNEP)
Global investments in renewable energy rebounded strongly last year, registering a solid 17% increase after two years of declines and brushing aside the challenge from sharply lower crude oil prices.

Measuring student engagement could help teachers, administrators adapt strategies
Educators believe that student engagement in the classroom is crucial to learning and that it can increase achievement and enrollment in challenging courses while decreasing dropout rates.

America's aging population will require more neurosurgeons for increased brain bleeds
By 2030, chronic subdural hemorrhage (SDH) will be the most common adult brain condition requiring neurosurgical intervention in the U.S., according to a new study conducted by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center.

Ocean pipes 'not cool,' would end up warming climate
To combat global climate change caused by greenhouse gases, alternative energy sources and other types of environmental recourse actions are needed. There are a variety of proposals that involve using vertical ocean pipes to move seawater to the surface from the depths in order to reap different potential climate benefits.

Study affirms lethal prostate cancer can spread from other metastatic sites
A new genomic analysis of tissue from patients with prostate cancer has added more evidence that cells within metastases from such tumors can migrate to other body parts and form new sites of spread on their own.

Fewer multiple births could reduce autism risk in ART children
In a paper published online today (Thursday, March 19), scientists report that the incidence of diagnosed autism was twice as high for assisted reproductive technology (ART) as non-ART births among the nearly 6 million children in their study, born in California from 1997 through 2007.

Neuropsychology: Power naps produce a significant improvement in memory performance
Generations of school students have gone to bed the night before a maths exam or a vocabulary test with their algebra book or vocabulary notes tucked under their pillow in the hope that the knowledge would somehow be magically transferred into their brains while they slept.

Increasing evidence points to inflammation as source of nervous system manifestations of Lyme disease
About 15% of patients with Lyme disease develop peripheral and central nervous system involvement, often accompanied by debilitating and painful symptoms.

Some mushrooms glow, and here's why
Did you know that there are mushrooms that actually glow? Aristotle was aware of this intriguing fact more than 2,000 years ago.

Can facial plastic surgery make you more likeable?
Facial plastic surgery may do more than make you look youthful. It could change -- for the better -- how people perceive you.

Government action needed on iconic World Heritage ecosystems
Without better local management, the world's most iconic ecosystems are at risk of collapse under climate change, say researchers in a study published in the journal Science.

University of Nebraska-Lincoln, US Navy develop next-gen temperature sensor to measure ocean dynamics
UNL engineers and the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have designed a next-generation temperature sensor set to improve the measurement of oceanic dynamics that shape marine biology, climate patterns and military operations.

Effect of smoking, alcohol on feeding tube duration in head/neck cancer patients
Current smoking and heavy alcohol consumption appear to be risk factors for prolonged use of a gastrostomy tube (GT, feeding tube) in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy.

Polio vaccination: Paper highlights final steps to polio eradication
April 12th 2015 marks the 60th anniversary of the publication of Jonas Salk's landmark polio vaccine trial results, which confirmed that the first vaccine against polio was safe and effective.

Men's preference for certain body types has evolutionary roots
A psychology study from The University of Texas at Austin sheds new light on today's standards of beauty, attributing modern men's preferences for women with a curvy backside to prehistoric influences.

Rutgers University chemistry research holds great promise for advancing sustainable energy
New research published by Rutgers University chemists has documented significant progress confronting one of the main challenges inhibiting widespread utilization of sustainable power: Creating a cost-effective process to store energy so it can be used later.

Interview blues -- anxious, slow talkers often do not get the job
Researchers offer a few tips for those who are worried that their nerves might stand between them and acing their next job interview.

Black holes and the dark sector explained by quantum gravity
Ask any theoretical physicist on what are the most profound mysteries in physics and you will be surprised if she mentions anything other than Quantum Gravity and the Dark Sector.

Streamlined 'military' work flow means more patient appointments and fewer return visits
Both patients and physicians may benefit from a "work flow" system developed at military medical facilities and tested at a Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center clinic, according to results of an efficiency study.

Experimental Ebola vaccine safe, prompts immune response
An early-stage clinical trial of an experimental Ebola vaccine conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) found that the vaccine, called VSV-ZEBOV, was safe and elicited robust antibody responses in all 40 of the healthy adults who received it.

Scientists use brain stimulation to boost creativity, set stage to treat depression
A UNC School of Medicine study has provided the first direct evidence that a low dose of electric current can enhance a specific brain pattern to boost creativity by an average of 7.4 percent in healthy adults, according to a common, well-validated test of creativity.

Big data key to precision medicine's success
Technological advances are enabling scientists to sequence the genomes of cancer tumors, revealing a detailed portrait of genetic mutations that drive these diseases.

UCSF team finds key to making neurons from stem cells
A research team at UC San Francisco has discovered an RNA molecule called Pnky that can be manipulated to increase the production of neurons from neural stem cells.

Milky Way's center unveils supernova 'dust factory'
Sifting through the center of the Milky Way galaxy, astronomers have made the first direct observations - using an infrared telescope aboard a modified Boeing 747 - of cosmic building-block dust resulting from an ancient supernova.

New scientific review suggests some women may benefit from considering use of S-equol to ease menopause symptoms
The investigational S-equol nutritional supplement may be a viable agent to alleviate certain menopause symptoms, such as hot flashes, according to a new peer-reviewed article in the March Journal of Women's Health.

Robotic materials: Changing with the world around them
Prosthetics with a realistic sense of touch. Bridges that detect and repair their own damage. Vehicles with camouflaging capabilities.

New transitory form of silica observed
A Carnegie-led team was able to discover five new forms of silica under extreme pressures at room temperature. Their findings are published by Nature Communications.

New, natural DNA-based drugs are safe, potent activators of immune system
An experimental single-stranded oligonucleotide-based drug, MGN1703, comprised only of natural DNA components, stimulates the human immune system to fight infections and attack cancer cells without causing the harmful side effects associated with similar compounds that also contain non-natural DNA components.

New strategy to protect healthy gut microbes from antibiotics
Gut microbes promote human health by fighting off pathogens, but they also contribute to diseases such as diabetes and cancer.

Better season-long nutrient supply in soybean a 'low-hanging fruit' to improve upon
Over the last several decades there have been substantial yield improvements in soybean. Because of new varieties and new agronomic practices, the yield potential in soybean is higher now than ever before.

Choice of protein & carbohydrate-rich foods may have big effects on long-term weight gain
Making small, consistent changes to the types of protein- and carbohydrate-rich foods we eat may have a big impact on long-term weight gain.

Axillary lymph node evaluation performed frequently in ductal carcinoma in situ
Axillary lymph node evaluation is performed frequently in women with ductal carcinoma in situ breast cancer, despite recommendations generally against such an assessment procedure in women with localized cancer undergoing breast-conserving surgery, according to a study published online by JAMA Oncology.

Depression often co-occurs with joint diseases
Those suffering from depressive symptoms have an increased risk for physical diseases, especially for arthrosis and arthritis.

Racial, ethnic differences in picking surgeons, hospitals for breast cancer care
Black and Hispanic women with breast cancer were less likely to pick their surgeon and the hospital for treatment based on reputation compared with white women, suggesting minority patients may rely more on physician referrals and health plans in those decisions.

Sharper nanoscopy
The 2014 chemistry Nobel Prize recognized important microscopy research that enabled greatly improved spatial resolution. This innovation, resulting in nanometer resolution, was made possible by making the source (the emitter) of the illumination quite small and by moving it quite close to the object being imaged.

'Warm blob' in Pacific Ocean linked to weird weather across the US
The one common element in recent weather has been oddness. The West Coast has been warm and parched; the East Coast has been cold and snowed under. Fish are swimming into new waters, and hungry seals are washing up on California beaches.

Public Release: 3-Apr-2015 Possible progress against Parkinson's and good news for stem cell therapies
Brazilian researchers at D'OR Institute for Research and Education (IDOR) and Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) have taken what they describe as an important step toward using the implantation of stem cell-generated neurons as a treatment for Parkinson's disease.

BPA can disrupt sexual function in turtles, could be a warning for environmental health
Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical that is used in a variety of consumer products, such as food storage products and resins that line plastic food and beverage containers.

Quantum physics -- hot and cold at the same time
Temperature is a very useful physical quantity. It allows us to make a simple statistical statement about the energy of particles swirling around on complicated paths without having to know the specific details of the system.

Stem cells show promise for reversing type 2 diabetes
Scientists at the University of British Columbia and BetaLogics, part of Janssen Research & Development, LLC have shown for the first time that Type 2 diabetes can be effectively treated with a combination of specially-cultured stem cells and conventional diabetes drugs.

In Alzheimer's mice, memory restored with cancer drug
Memory and as well as connections between brain cells were restored in mice with a model of Alzheimer's given an experimental cancer drug, Yale School of Medicine researchers reported in the journal Annals of Neurology.

The taming of the shrew
CH5+, formed by adding a proton (H+) to the well-known methane (CH4) molecule, is the prototype of fluxional molecules. In contrast to common molecules, which are depicted as a rigid structure consisting of balls (atoms) and sticks (chemical bonds), the five hydrogen nuclei in CH5+ can move quite freely around the carbon nucleus.

Earth Day: Disease spread among species is predictable
On Earth Day, a study of disease dynamics in a California grassland has revealed fundamental principles underlying the spread of pathogens, or disease-causing microbes, among species.

Packing heat: New fluid makes untapped geothermal energy cleaner
More American homes could be powered by the earth's natural underground heat with a new, nontoxic and potentially recyclable liquid that is expected to use half as much water as other fluids used to tap into otherwise unreachable geothermal hot spots.

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