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The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past month
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Dogs exhibit jealous behavior
Dogs exhibit more jealous behaviors, like snapping or pushing their owner, when their owners displayed affectionate behaviors towards what appeared to be another dog compared to random objects.

New bipartisan House bill draws on U-M health research
A new bill introduced in Congress with bipartisan support would allow Medicare to test a concept born from University of Michigan research, which could improve the health of patients with chronic illness while reducing what they spend on the medicines and tests they need most.



Stanford study shows how to power California with wind, water and sun
Imagine a smog-free Los Angeles, where electric cars ply silent freeways, solar panels blanket rooftops and power plants run on heat from beneath the earth, from howling winds and from the blazing desert sun.

Immune response may cause harm in brain injuries, disorders
Could the body's own immune system play a role in memory impairment and cognitive dysfunction associated with conditions like chronic epilepsy, Alzheimer's dementia and concussions? Cleveland Clinic researchers believe so, based on a study published online by PLOS ONE.

Study Reveals Immune System is Dazed and Confused During Spaceflight
There is nothing like a head cold to make us feel a little dazed. We get things like colds and the flu because of changes in our immune system.

500 million year reset for the immune system
A single factor can reset the immune system of mice to a state likely similar to what it was 500 million years ago, when the first vertebrates emerged.

Zombie ant fungi manipulate hosts to die on the 'doorstep' of the colony
A parasitic fungus that must kill its ant hosts outside their nest to reproduce and transmit their infection, manipulates its victims to die in the vicinity of the colony, ensuring a constant supply of potential new hosts, according to researchers at Penn State and colleagues at Brazil's Federal University of Vicosa.

Why global warming is taking a break
Global warming is currently taking a break: whereas global temperatures rose drastically into the late 1990s, the global average temperature has risen only slightly since 1998 - surprising, considering scientific climate models predicted considerable warming due to rising greenhouse gas emissions.

Leukemia drug shows promise for skin, breast and other cancers
A leukemia drug called dasatinib shows promise for treating skin, breast and several other cancers, according to researchers at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

Neck manipulation may be associated with stroke
Treatments involving neck manipulation may be associated with stroke, though it cannot be said with certainty that neck manipulation causes strokes, according to a new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke.

Pitt engineer turns metal into glass
Materials scientists have long sought to form glass from pure, monoatomic metals. Scott X. Mao and colleagues did it.

New protein structure could help treat Alzheimer's, related diseases
There is no cure for Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, but the research community is one step closer to finding treatment.

'Wetting' a battery's appetite for renewable energy storage
Sun, wind and other renewable energy sources could make up a larger portion of the electricity America consumes if better batteries could be built to store the intermittent energy for cloudy, windless days. Now a new material could allow more utilities to store large amounts of renewable energy and make the nation's power system more reliable and resilient.

The difficult question of Clostridium difficile
The bacterium Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-related diarrhoea and is a growing problem in the hospital environment and elsewhere in the community.

Exporting US coal to Asia could drop emissions 21 percent
Under the right scenario, exporting U.S. coal to power plants in South Korea could lead to a 21 percent drop in greenhouse gas emissions compared to burning the fossil fuel at plants in the United States, according to a new Duke University-led study.

An embryonic cell's fate is sealed by the speed of a signal
When embryonic cells get the signal to specialize the call can come quickly. Or it can arrive slowly. Now, new research from Rockefeller University suggests the speed at which a cell in an embryo receives that signal has an unexpected influence on that cell's fate.

Scientists study 'talking' turtles in Brazilian Amazon
Turtles are well known for their longevity and protective shells, but it turns out these reptiles use sound to stick together and care for young, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society and other organizations.

No one-size-fits-all approach in a changing climate, changing land
As climate change alters habitats for birds and bees and everything in between, so too does the way humans decide to use land.

NOAA, EPA-supported scientists find average but large Gulf dead zone
NOAA- and EPA-supported scientists have mapped the Gulf of Mexico dead zone, an area with low oxygen water, measuring 5,052 square miles this summer--approximately the size of the state of Connecticut.

Recycling old batteries into solar cells
This could be a classic win-win solution: A system proposed by researchers at MIT recycles materials from discarded car batteries - a potential source of lead pollution - into new, long-lasting solar panels that provide emissions-free power.

Climate Change Will Threaten Fish by Drying Out Southwest U.S. Streams, Study Predicts
Fish species native to a major Arizona watershed may lose access to important segments of their habitat by 2050 as surface water flow is reduced by the effects of climate warming, new research suggests.

Pygmy phenotype developed many times, adaptive to rainforest
The small body size associated with the pygmy phenotype is probably a selective adaptation for rainforest hunter-gatherers, according to an international team of researchers, but all African pygmy phenotypes do not have the same genetic underpinning, suggesting a more recent adaptation than previously thought.

Zebrafish help to unravel Alzheimer's disease
New fundamental knowledge about the regulation of stem cells in the nerve tissue of zebrafish embryos results in surprising insights into neurodegenerative disease processes in the human brain. A new study by scientists at VIB and KU Leuven identifies the molecules responsible for this process.

Effect of microenvironment modulation on stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury pain
Spinal cord injury (SCI) currently ranks second after mental retardation among neurological disorders in terms of cost to society.

Applying new cholesterol guidelines to a patient population reduces heart attacks, strokes, study finds
A study from UT Southwestern researchers found that recently introduced cholesterol guidelines would significantly reduce new cardiovascular events, when compared to treatment based on previous cholesterol guidelines.

Antibodies, together with viral 'inducers,' found to control HIV in mice
Although HIV can now be effectively suppressed using anti-retroviral drugs, it still comes surging back the moment the flow of drugs is stopped. Latent reservoirs of HIV-infected cells, invisible to the body's immune system and unreachable by pharmaceuticals, ensure that the infection will rebound after therapy is terminated.

Mammography benefits women over 75
Mammography-detected breast cancer is associated with a shift to earlier stage diagnosis in older women, subsequently reducing the rate of more advanced, difficult-to-treat cases, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology.

Losing weight won't make you happy
Weight loss significantly improves physical health but effects on mental health are less straightforward, finds new UCL research funded by Cancer Research UK.

Researchers inspired by marine life to design camouflage systems
It could be a fun party trick - put your cell phone down on a table and watch it fade into the woodwork - or part of a lifesaving technology used by industry or the military.

Metastatic Brain Tumor Treatment Could Be on the Horizon With SapC-DOPS Use
Over half of patients being seen in the clinic for a diagnosed brain tumor have metastatic cancer, which has no treatment and detrimental outcomes in most cases.

Simple Tips to Fend Off Freak-Outs
There's sad news in the study of happiness. Rest assured, there is a happy ending, though.

Largest cancer genetic analysis reveals new way of classifying cancer
Researchers with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have completed the largest, most diverse tumor genetic analysis ever conducted, revealing a new approach to classifying cancers.

Trees and shrubs invading critical grasslands, diminish cattle production
Half of the Earth's land mass is made up of rangelands, which include grasslands and savannas, yet they are being transformed at an alarming rate.

Lead in teeth can tell a body's tale, UF study finds
Your teeth can tell stories about you, and not just that you always forget to floss.

Dress for Success: UC Research Examines Male Influences on 'Looking' Middle Class
They might be called a chip off the old block, but when it comes to upward social mobility, they might call Dad a lesson in what not to wear.

A protein couple controls flow of information into the brain's memory center
Neuroscientists in Bonn and Heidelberg have succeeded in providing new insights into how the brain works. Researchers at the DZNE and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) analyzed tissue samples from mice to identify how two specific proteins, 'CKAMP44' and 'TARP Gamma-8', act upon the brain's memory center.

Opioid users breathe easier with novel drug to treat respiratory depression
People taking prescription opioids to treat moderate to severe pain may be able to breathe a little easier, literally.

New treatment successful for the Mal de Debarquement Syndrome
People who suffer from a rare illness, the Mal de Debarquement Syndrome (MdDS), now have a chance for full recovery thanks to treatment developed by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Their findings were published online in the July issue of Frontiers in Neurology.

Companion planets can increase old worlds' chance at life
Having a companion in old age is good for people - and, it turns out, might extend the chance for life on certain Earth-sized planets in the cosmos as well.

The economy of bitcoins
The massive spread of the cryptocurrency or digital currency, Bitcoin, opens up new pathways for researchers to study social action on markets.

Old naked mole rats are young at heart, study finds
Cardiovascular disease is the greatest killer of humans the world over, presenting huge financial and quality-of-life issues.

Climate change and the soil
The planet's soil releases about 60 billion tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year, which is far more than that released by burning fossil fuels.

NOAA analysis reveals significant land cover changes in US coastal regions
A new NOAA nationwide analysis shows that between 1996 and 2011, 64,975 square miles in coastal regions--an area larger than the state of Wisconsin--experienced changes in land cover, including a decline in wetlands and forest cover with development a major contributing factor.

What if hormones aren't fuel for the fire after all?
It's no wonder that breast cancer ranks highest among women's health concerns. Over 235,000 cases of breast cancer are diagnosed annually in the United States, with almost 40,000 deaths attributable to the disease.

Worldwide water shortage by 2040
Two new reports that focus on the global electricity water nexus have just been published. Three years of research show that by the year 2040 there will not be enough water in the world to quench the thirst of the world population and keep the current energy and power solutions going if we continue doing what we are doing today.

Innate lymphoid cells elicit T cell responses
In case of an inflammation the body releases substances that increase the immune defense. During chronic inflammation, this immune response gets out of control and can induce organ damage.

Happiness in schizophrenia
Schizophrenia is among the most severe forms of mental illness, yet some people with the disease are as happy as those in good physical and mental health according to a study led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.

Researchers obtain key insights into how the internal body clock is tuned
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found a new way that internal body clocks are regulated by a type of molecule known as long non-coding RNA.

Purdue ag economists: Shale oil 'dividend' could pay for smaller carbon footprint
Unanticipated economic benefits from the shale oil and gas boom could help offset the costs of substantially reducing the U.S.'s carbon footprint, Purdue agricultural economists say.

Stanford professor finds that wildfires and other burns play bigger role in climate change
It has long been known that biomass burning - burning forests to create agricultural lands, burning savannah as a ritual , slash-and-burn agriculture and wildfires - figures into both climate change and public health.

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