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The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past month
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Small eddies produce global effects on climate change
The increasing strength of winds over the Southern Ocean has extended its ability to absorb carbon dioxide, effectively delaying the impacts of global warming.

Flight and nuclear safety boosted by sound research
A system for using sound waves to spot potentially dangerous cracks in pipes, aircraft engines and nuclear power plants has been developed by a University of Strathclyde academic.



Small molecule helps get stem cells to sites of disease and damage
Bioengineers from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) with collaborators at the pharmaceutical company Sanofi have identified small molecules that can be used to program stem cells to home in on sites of damage, disease and inflammation.

NC State researchers create 'nanofiber gusher'
Creating large amounts of polymer nanofibers dispersed in liquid is a challenge that has vexed researchers for years. But engineers and researchers at North Carolina State University and one of its start-up companies have now reported a method that can produce unprecedented amounts of polymer nanofibers, which have potential applications in filtration, batteries and cell scaffolding.

Researchers demonstrate optogenetic stimulation of the brain to control pain
A new study by a University of Texas at Arlington physics team in collaboration with bioengineering and psychology researchers shows for the first time how a small area of the brain can be optically stimulated to control pain.

Radiation plus immunotherapy combo revs up immune system to better attack melanoma, Penn study suggests
Treating metastatic melanoma with a triple threat--including radiation therapy and two immunotherapies that target the CTLA4 and PD-1 pathways--could elicit an optimal response in more patients, one that will boost the immune system's attack on the disease, suggests a new study from a multidisciplinary team of researchers from Penn's Abramson Cancer Center published today in Nature.

Medical expansion has led people worldwide to feel less healthy
Across much of the Western world, 25 years of expansion of the medical system has actually led to people feeling less healthy over time, a new study has found.

New findings show stark inequalities in aging as government encourages us to work longer
Changes in pension and employment policies are making it increasingly necessary for older people in the UK to work beyond the age of 65.

New MIND diet may significantly protect against Alzheimer's disease
A new diet, appropriately known by the acronym MIND, could significantly lower a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, even if the diet is not meticulously followed, according to a paper published online for subscribers in March in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association.

Found: Ancient, super-bright quasar with massive black hole
Quasars--supermassive black holes found at the center of distant massive galaxies--are the most-luminous beacons in the sky.

Distant supernova split 4 ways by gravitational lens
Over the past several decades, astronomers have come to realize that the sky is filled with magnifying glasses that allow the study of very distant and faint objects barely visible with even the largest telescopes.

High-energy breakfast with low-energy dinner helps control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes
A small new study published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) shows that, in people with type 2 diabetes, those who consume a high energy breakfast and a low energy dinner have better blood sugar control than those who eat a low energy breakfast and a high energy dinner.

Researchers discover 'milk' protein that enables survival of the species
Australian researchers have discovered the protein MCL-1 is critical for keeping milk-producing cells alive and sustaining milk production in the breast.

Fewer multiple births could reduce autism risk in ART children
In a paper published online today (Thursday, March 19), scientists report that the incidence of diagnosed autism was twice as high for assisted reproductive technology (ART) as non-ART births among the nearly 6 million children in their study, born in California from 1997 through 2007.

Radio chip for the 'Internet of things'
At this year's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, the big theme was the "Internet of things" -- the idea that everything in the human environment, from kitchen appliances to industrial equipment, could be equipped with sensors and processors that can exchange data, helping with maintenance and the coordination of tasks.

Skin test may shed new light on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases
Scientists have discovered a skin test that may shed new light on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, according to a study released today will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., April 18 to 25, 2015.

Genetically modified soybean oil only slightly healthier than regular soybean oil
A new soybean oil genetically modified to be healthier than conventional soybean oil causes obesity, pre-diabetes and fatty liver in a nearly identical manner to that of regular soybean oil when part of a typical American high-fat diet, an animal study shows.

How healthy is genetically modified soybean oil?
Soybean oil accounts for more than 90 percent of all the seed oil production in the United States. Genetically modified (GM) soybean oil, made from seeds of GM soybean plants, was recently introduced into the food supply on the premise that it is healthier than conventional soybean oil.

First direct observation of carbon dioxide's increasing greenhouse effect at the Earth's surface
Scientists have observed an increase in carbon dioxide's greenhouse effect at the Earth's surface for the first time.

Living in the genetic comfort zone
The information encoded in the DNA of an organism is not sufficient to determine the expression pattern of genes.

Government action needed on iconic World Heritage ecosystems
Without better local management, the world's most iconic ecosystems are at risk of collapse under climate change, say researchers in a study published in the journal Science.

Rutgers University chemistry research holds great promise for advancing sustainable energy
New research published by Rutgers University chemists has documented significant progress confronting one of the main challenges inhibiting widespread utilization of sustainable power: Creating a cost-effective process to store energy so it can be used later.

World Heritage Sites risk collapse without stronger local management
Without better local management, the world's most iconic ecosystems are at risk of collapse under climate change, say researchers in Science.

NASA snaps picture of Eastern US in a record-breaking 'freezer'
NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the snow-covered eastern U.S. that looks like the states have been sitting in a freezer. In addition to the snow cover, Arctic and Siberian air masses have settled in over the Eastern U.S. triggering many record low temperatures in many states.

Newly discovered algal species helps corals survive in the hottest reefs on the planet
A new species of algae has been discovered in reef corals of the Persian (Arabian) Gulf where it helps corals to survive seawater temperatures of up to 36 degrees Celsius - temperatures that would kill corals elsewhere.

EARTH Magazine: Hazard lingers after South Napa earthquake
Napa Valley earthquake, movement continued along the principal fault to the north of the epicenter, according to a report released by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Astronomers find impossibly large black hole
An international team of astronomers have found a huge and ancient black hole which was powering the brightest object early in the universe.

Traditional forms of media coverage valued over advertising, UGA study finds
In an age where digital media is constantly changing, public relations practitioners and business professionals still see the benefits of traditional media coverage, according to a recent study in Public Relations Journal conducted by researchers at the University of Georgia.

A new look at culture and its influence on individuals and organizations
Whether you are an executive, an entrepreneur, or even an MBA student, the ability to bridge cultural gaps and leverage foreign ideas and opportunities is critical to success in today's increasingly global business environment.

Detecting defects at the nanoscale will profit solar panel production
RESEARCH at the University of Huddersfield will lead to major efficiency gains and cost savings in the manufacture of flexible solar panels.

For patients with brain tumors, insurance status linked to differences in patient safety and quality of care
Patients that are on Medicaid or uninsured have higher rates of reportable patient safety and quality of care issues during hospitalization for brain tumors, reports a study in the March issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

NYU study successfully screens for diabetes at dental visits using oral blood
It is estimated that 8.1 million of the 29.1 million Americans living with diabetes are undiagnosed and many who have diabetes have poor glycemic control.

Some mushrooms glow, and here's why
Did you know that there are mushrooms that actually glow? Aristotle was aware of this intriguing fact more than 2,000 years ago.

Finding psychological insights through social media
Social media has opened up a new digital world for psychology research. Four researchers will be discussing new methods of language analysis, and how social media can be leveraged to study personality, mental and physical health, and cross-cultural differences.

HIV latency is not an accident: It is a survival tactic employed by the virus
New research from the Gladstone Institutes for the first time provides strong evidence that HIV latency is controlled not by infected host cells, but by the virus itself.

Graphene meets heat waves
In the race to miniaturize electronic components, researchers are challenged with a major problem: the smaller or the faster your device, the more challenging it is to cool it down.

Too many food choices exacerbate the battle against obesity, researchers find
Some scientists say that when mothers eat poorly during pregnancy, they pass along traits to their children that make them more likely to have poor diets and have related health problems.

Ocean pipes 'not cool,' would end up warming climate
To combat global climate change caused by greenhouse gases, alternative energy sources and other types of environmental recourse actions are needed. There are a variety of proposals that involve using vertical ocean pipes to move seawater to the surface from the depths in order to reap different potential climate benefits.

Filipino newcomers to Canada diagnosed with breast cancer at a younger age
Filipinos who move to Canada are diagnosed with breast cancer at a younger age than women from other parts of East Asia or Caucasians, new research has found.

The first ever photograph of light as a particle and a wave
Quantum mechanics tells us that light can behave simultaneously as a particle or a wave. However, there has never been an experiment able to capture both natures of light at the same time; the closest we have come is seeing either wave or particle, but always at different times.

Discovery about beliefs could prove useful in addiction treatment, researchers say
Two identical cigarettes led to a discovery by scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute. Study participants inhaled nicotine, yet they showed significantly different brain activity.

New HPV approved after international phase 2/3 trial involving Moffitt Cancer Center
Approximately 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year in the United States and another 4,000 die annually from the disease.

Yale researchers reverse type 2 diabetes and fatty liver disease in rats
Yale researchers developed a controlled-release oral therapy that reversed type 2 diabetes and fatty liver disease in rats, according to a study published on Feb. 26 by Science.

Researchers find link between inflammation, tissue regeneration and wound repair response
Almost all injuries, even minor skin scratches, trigger an inflammatory response, which provides protection against invading microbes but also turns on regenerative signals needed for healing and injury repair - a process that is generally understood but remains mysterious in its particulars.

Relief for diabetics with painful condition
Walking barefoot on sand "felt like walking on glass" for Keith Wenckowski, who has lived with type-one diabetes for more than two decades.

Ultrasound lags behind MRI for supplemental breast cancer screening
Cancer screening of women with dense breast tissue is a subject of great interest to both the medical community and the press.

Climate science literacy unrelated to public acceptance of human-caused global warming
Deep public divisions over climate change are unrelated to differences in how well ordinary citizens understand scientific evidence on global warming.

Scientists find a key protein that allows Plavix to conquer platelets
Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have found that the blood platelet protein Rasa3 is critical to the success of the common anti-platelet drug Plavix, which breaks up blood clots during heart attacks and other arterial diseases.

Robotic materials: Changing with the world around them
Prosthetics with a realistic sense of touch. Bridges that detect and repair their own damage. Vehicles with camouflaging capabilities.

Stretch and relax! -- Losing 1 electron switches magnetism on in dichromium
The scientists used the unique Nanocluster Trap experimental station at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin and published their results in the Journal Angewandte Chemie.

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