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The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past month
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Societies issue recommendations for left atrial appendage occlusion
The American College of Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society and Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions today released a new overview on the implantation of left atrial appendage occlusion devices.

Siting wind farms more quickly, cheaply
When a power company wants to build a new wind farm, it generally hires a consultant to make wind speed measurements at the proposed site for eight to 12 months. Those measurements are correlated with historical data and used to assess the site's power-generation capacity.



Sweeping lasers snap together nanoscale geometric grids
Down at the nanoscale, where objects span just billionths of a meter, the size and shape of a material can often have surprising and powerful electronic and optical effects.

Statins show promise to reduce major complications following lung surgery
The results of a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of patients undergoing elective pulmonary resection was designed to evaluate the effects of statin therapy.

Heart patients can stop blood thinners when undergoing elective surgery
Patients with atrial fibrillation who stopped taking blood thinners before they had elective surgery had no higher risk of developing blood clots and less risk of major bleeding compared to patients who were given a "bridge" therapy, according to research led by Duke Medicine.

Stanford research sheds light on how neurons control muscle movement
Stanford University researchers studying how the brain controls movement in people with paralysis, related to their diagnosis of Lou Gehrig's disease, have found that groups of neurons work together, firing in complex rhythms to signal muscles about when and where to move.

Wind energy provides 8 percent of Europe's electricity
EU's grid connected cumulative capacity in 2014 reached 129 GW, meeting 8% of European electricity demand, equivalent to the combined annual consumption of Belgium, the Netherlands, Greece and Ireland.

Low-nicotine cigarettes fail to sway smokers
Smokers who successfully lowered their nicotine intake when they were switched to low-nicotine cigarettes were unable to curb their smoking habits in the long term, according to a study by researchers at UCSF and San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center.

What your clothes may say about you
Moving closer to the possibility of "materials that compute" and wearing your computer on your sleeve, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering have designed a responsive hybrid material that is fueled by an oscillatory chemical reaction and can perform computations based on changes in the environment or movement, and potentially even respond to human vital signs.

Public Release: 7-Jul-2015 Vitamin C related to reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and early death
New research from the University of Copenhagen and Herlev and Gentofte Hospital shows that high vitamin C concentrations in the blood from the intake of fruit and vegetables are associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and early death.

Professor discovers new lichen species in city of Boulder
A University of Colorado Boulder scientist unexpectedly discovered two lichen species new to science in the same week while conducting research in Boulder Colorado, near the city's eastern limits.

UCLA chemists devise technology that could transform solar energy storage
The materials in most of today's residential rooftop solar panels can store energy from the sun for only a few microseconds at a time. A new technology developed by chemists at UCLA is capable of storing solar energy for up to several weeks -- an advance that could change the way scientists think about designing solar cells.

Temple-led research team finds bacterial biofilms may play a role in lupus
Lupus, multiple sclerosis, and type-1 diabetes are among more than a score of diseases in which the immune system attacks the body it was designed to defend. But just why the immune system begins its misdirected assault has remained a mystery.

As smoking declines, more are likely to quit
Smokeless tobacco and, more recently, e-cigarettes have been promoted as a harm reduction strategy for smokers who are "unable or unwilling to quit."

Epigenetic driver of glioblastoma provides new therapeutic target
Cancer's ability to grow unchecked is often attributed to cancer stem cells, a small fraction of cancer cells that have the capacity to grow and multiply indefinitely. How cancer stem cells retain this property while the bulk of a tumor's cells do not remains largely unknown.

Hubble sees atmosphere being stripped from Neptune-sized exoplanet
Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have discovered an immense cloud of hydrogen dispersing from a warm, Neptune-sized planet orbiting a nearby star. The enormous gaseous tail of the planet is about 50 times the size of the parent star.

What's new in contact lenses? Prescribing trends reflect new lens materials and designs
More Americans are using soft contact lenses -- especially daily disposable lenses -- and taking advantage of new designs targeting vision problems that were difficult to correct with previous contact lenses, reports the July issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry.

Diet that mimics fasting appears to slow aging
Want to lose abdominal fat, get smarter and live longer? New research led by USC's Valter Longo shows that periodically adopting a diet that mimics the effects of fasting may yield a wide range of health benefits.

Study finds people over 65 with traumatic brain injuries hospitalized 4 times as often as younger people
A disproportionate number of people hospitalized in Canada with traumatic brain injuries are 65 years or older, a new study from St. Michael's Hospital has found.

Drugs for impotence do not increase risk of melanoma
Using drugs for impotence does not increase the risk of malignant melanoma, researchers from Ume├ą University in Sweden conclude in a publication in JAMA, a top US medical journal.

ASU researcher disputes claim that humans can distinguish 1 trillion odors
An Arizona State University researcher is calling into question recent findings that the human nose is capable of distinguishing at least 1 trillion odors. Rick Gerkin, an assistant research professor with ASU School of Life Sciences, says the data used in a study made public last year does not support this claim.

Fundamental beliefs about atherosclerosis overturned
Doctors' efforts to battle the dangerous atherosclerotic plaques that build up in our arteries and cause heart attacks and strokes are built on several false beliefs about the fundamental composition and formation of the plaques, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine shows.

Study shows second severe allergic reaction can occur hours after first
Parents of kids with severe allergies know how scary a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) is. New research offers clues as to why some kids can have a second, related reaction hours later - and what to do about it.

S100B protein in diagnosing intracranial hemorrhage in some patients with mild head injury
Researchers conducted a prospective observational study in elderly patients and adult patients receiving antiplatelet therapy who presented with mild head injury at two trauma hospitals in Vienna: the Trauma Hospital Meidling and the Donauspital.

Scientists shows AIDS vaccine candidate successfully 'primes' immune system
New research led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) and The Rockefeller University shows in mice that an experimental vaccine candidate designed at TSRI can stimulate the immune system activity necessary to stop HIV infection.

Diet mimicking fasting promotes regeneration and longevity in mice, piloted in humans
Calorie restriction has been shown to have beneficial effects on health in organisms from yeast to humans, yet following a regimen of extreme fasting is psychologically difficult, and its advantages for humans are controversial.

Titan's atmosphere even more Earth-like than previously thought
Scientists at UCL have observed how a widespread polar wind is driving gas from the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan.

Pitt scientists lead consensus guidelines for thyroid cancer molecular tests
University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) scientists recently led a panel of experts in revising national guidelines for thyroid cancer testing to reflect newly available tests that better incorporate personalized medicine into diagnosing the condition.

Enriched blood cells preserve cognition in mice with features of Alzheimer's disease
Cedars-Sinai researchers have successfully tested two new methods for preserving cognition in laboratory mice that exhibit features of Alzheimer's disease by using white blood cells from bone marrow and a drug for multiple sclerosis to control immune response in the brain.

Researchers find a potential target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes
DIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute

Discovery in the US of the New Guinea flatworm -- one of the worst known invasive species
The land planarian Platydemus manokwari, or New Guinea flatworm, is a highly invasive species, already reported in many territories in the Pacific area, and as well as in France.

Climate change won't reduce winter deaths
In a study that contradicts the received wisdom on health impacts of climate change, scientists say that we shouldn't expect substantial reduction in winter deaths as a result of global warming.

To the rescue: Helping threatened Mediterranean sea turtles
Researchers Ullmann and Stachowitsch critically review the current state of sea turtle rescue centres and first-aid stations in relation to the mortality trends for two charismatic yet endangered flagship species - the Mediterranean loggerhead and green turtle populations. Their findings were published in the open-access journal Nature Conservation.

What can 3-year-olds teach us about justice? Plenty
Toddlers have a reputation for being stubborn, selfish, and incapable of sharing.

Adolescents who view medical marijuana ads more likely to use the drug, study finds
Adolescents who saw advertising for medical marijuana were more likely to either report using marijuana or say they planned to use the substance in the future, according to a new RAND Corporation study.

Could black phosphorus be the next silicon?
As scientists continue to hunt for a material that will make it possible to pack more transistors on a chip, new research from McGill University and Universit├© de Montr├©al adds to evidence that black phosphorus could emerge as a strong candidate.

Risk of interbreeding due to climate change lower than expected
One of the questions raised by climate change has been whether it could cause more species of animals to interbreed.

Oklahoma earthquakes linked to oil and gas drilling
Stanford geophysicists have identified the triggering mechanism responsible for the recent spike of earthquakes in parts of Oklahoma-a crucial first step in eventually stopping them.

Baboons decide where to go together
Researchers have found evidence of shared decision-making among a troop of wild baboons, providing insight into how animals that live in socially complex, hierarchical societies reach consensus on decisions that affect the entire group.

Staying cool: Saharan silver ants
Nanfang Yu, assistant professor of applied physics at Columbia Engineering, and colleagues from the University of Z├╝rich and the University of Washington, have discovered two key strategies that enable Saharan silver ants to stay cool in one of the hottest terrestrial environments on Earth.

Mass. General team generates therapeutic nitric oxide from air with an electric spark
Treatment with inhaled nitric oxide (NO) has proven to be life saving in newborns, children and adults with several dangerous conditions, but the availability of the treatment has been limited by the size, weight and complexity of equipment needed to administer the gas and the therapy's high price.

Tundra study uncovers impact of climate warming in the Arctic
Significant changes in one of the Earth's most important ecosystems are not only a symptom of climate change, but may fuel further warming, research suggests.

Researchers successfully target 'Achilles' heel' of MERS virus
A Purdue University-led team of researchers studying the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, have found molecules that shut down the activity of an essential enzyme in the virus and could lead the way to better treatments for those infected.

A supportive close friendship helps boys and girls overcome adversity
A single supportive close friendship can help young people from low-income backgrounds to thrive in challenging circumstances, according to a new University of Sussex study.

Live imaging reveals how wound healing influences cancer
Researchers in the United Kingdom and Denmark have studied the "see-through" larvae of zebrafish to reveal how wound healing leads to skin cancer.

'Here comes the sun': Does pop music have a 'rhythm of the rain?'
Weather is frequently portrayed in popular music, with a new scientific study finding over 750 popular music songs referring to weather, the most common being sun and rain, and blizzards being the least common. The study also found many song writers were inspired by weather events.

Killer sea snail a target for new drugs
University of Queensland pain treatment researchers have discovered thousands of new peptide toxins hidden deep within the venom of just one type of Queensland cone snail.

Therapy affects the brain of people with Tourette syndrome
In addition to its effect on chronic tics, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can change the brain function of people with Tourette syndrome.

Study finds decreased rates of high-grade cervical lesions in young women
A new analysis indicates that rates of high-grade cervical lesions decreased in young U.S. women after vaccines were made available to protect against human papillomavirus (HPV), but the trend may be due in part to changes in cervical cancer screening recommendations.

Targeting telomeres, the timekeepers of cells, could improve chemotherapy
Telomeres, specialized ends of our chromosomes that dictate how long cells can continue to duplicate themselves, have long been studied for their links to the aging process and cancer.

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