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The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past month
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How a metabolic pathway promotes breast cancer metastasis
A metabolic pathway that is up-regulated in certain breast cancers promotes the disease's progression by activating a cell signaling protein called Arf6, according to a paper published in the Journal of Cell Biology.

Single dose of trastuzumab kick starts immune response in certain breast cancers
A tumor's immune response to a single dose of the HER2 inhibitor trastuzumab predicted which patients with HER2-positive breast cancer would respond to the drug on a more long-term basis, according to the results of a study published recently in Clinical Cancer Research.



Solar storm researchers prepare for the 'big one' with new urgency
The specter of a geomagnetic solar storm with the ferocity to disrupt communications satellites, knock out GPS systems, shut down air travel and quench lights, computers and telephones in millions of homes for days, months or even years has yet to grip the public as a panic-inducing possibility.

DNA as a weapon of immune defense
Our innate immune system, made up mainly of phagocytes, protects our body by exterminating bacteria. To do this, it uses two mechanisms.

Earth's soils could play key role in locking away greenhouse gases
The world's soils could store an extra 8 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases, helping to limit the impacts of climate change, research suggests.

So long lithium, hello bacteria batteries?
As renewable energy sources grow, so does the demand for new ways to store the resulting energy at low-cost and in environmentally friendly ways.

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: New evidence suggests Zika virus can cross placental barrier, but link with microcephaly remains unclear
Zika virus has been detected in the amniotic fluid of two pregnant women whose foetuses had been diagnosed with microcephaly, according to a study published today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Reducing food waste could help mitigate climate change
About a tenth of overall global greenhouse-gas emissions from agriculture could be traced back to food waste by mid-century, a new study shows. A team from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research for the first time provides comprehensive food loss projections for countries around the world while also calculating the associated emissions.

Autoimmune diseases gonna be defeated
An international team of scientists led by the Lomonosov Moscow State University group made a significant step in creating a new type of drug for treatment of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's diseaase.

Blood vessels sprout under pressure
It is blood pressure that drives the opening of small capillaries during angiogenesis. A team of researchers led by Prof. Holger Gerhardt of the MDC observed the process for the first time and published their findings in Nature Cell Biology.

Gulf of Mexico historic shipwrecks help scientists unlock mysteries of deep-sea ecosystems
The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill significantly altered microbial communities thriving near shipwrecks in the Gulf of Mexico, potentially changing these diverse ecosystems and degrading the historically and culturally significant ships they live on, according to new research being presented here.

Supermassive black holes may be lurking everywhere in the universe
A near-record supermassive black hole discovered in a sparse area of the local universe indicates that these monster objects - this one equal to 17 billion suns - may be more common than once thought, according to University of California, Berkeley, astronomers.

How climate change will affect western groundwater
By 2050 climate change will increase the groundwater deficit even more for four economically important aquifers in the western U.S., reports a University of Arizona-led team of scientists.

Geothermal heat contributes to Greenland ice melt
An international team that includes University of Montana researcher Jesse Johnson has learned that the Earth's internal heat enhances rapid ice flow and subglacial melting in Greenland.

Researchers visualize brain's serotonin pump, provide blueprint for new, more effective SSRIs
Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University's Vollum Institute have uncovered remarkably detailed 3-D views of one of the most important transporters in the brain - the serotonin transporter.

UCSB researchers identify specific defects in LED diodes that lead to less efficient solid state lighting
Using state-of-the-art theoretical methods, UCSB researchers have identified a specific type of defect in the atomic structure of a light-emitting diode (LED) that results in less efficient performance.

Results of world's first study on new treatment for heroin addiction
The results of the ground-breaking SALOME research, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Psychiatry, show chronic heroin addiction now has another effective treatment tool - hyrdomorphone, a licensed pain medication.

Behemoth black hole found in an unlikely place
Astronomers have uncovered one of the biggest supermassive black holes, with the mass of 17 billion Suns, in an unlikely place: the centre of a galaxy that lies in a quiet backwater of the Universe.

Scientists discover C4 photosynthesis boosts growth by altering size and structure of plant leaves and roots
Plants using C4 photosynthesis grow 20-100 per cent quicker than more common C3 plants by altering the shape, size and structure of their leaves and roots, according to a new study.

Crab shell signaling helps control the many faces of cholera, study shows
In humans, cholera is among the world's most deadly diseases, killing as many as 140,000 persons a year, according to World Health Organization statistics.

Smartphone users are redefining privacy in public spaces
Private v. public, virtual v. real have converged in a world saturated by information technology. It seems impossible to divide the public from the personal. But when and where do we choose to share information about ourselves?

Oily fish eaten during pregnancy may reduce risk of asthma in offspring
Children born to mothers who eat salmon when pregnant may be less likely to have doctor diagnosed asthma compared to children whose mothers do not eat it, new research has shown.

For parents of autistic children, more social support means better health
About one in 68 children in the United States has an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Their parents consistently report greater stress levels, caregiving burden and depression than parents of typically developing children.

Mediterranean loggerhead turtles dying in waters off the Middle East and North Africa
Thousands of loggerhead turtles are killed annually in areas of Syria, Libya and Egypt and Tunisia where they travel to find food, a new study led by researchers at the University of Exeter has highlighted.

Higher levels of vitamin D correspond to lower cancer risk, researchers say
Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that higher levels of vitamin D - specifically serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D - are associated with a correspondingly reduced risk of cancer. The findings are published in the April 6, online issue of PLOS ONE.

Fresh fruit associated with lower risk of heart attack and stroke
People who eat fresh fruit on most days are at lower risk of heart attack and stroke than people who rarely eat fresh fruit, according to new research published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Young, unattached Jupiter analog found in solar neighborhood
A team of astronomers from Carnegie and the University of Western Ontario has discovered one of the youngest and brightest free-floating, planet-like objects within relatively close proximity to the Sun.

Are narcissists more likely to post selfies and care about the feedback they receive?
Korean researchers studied how narcissism relates to a person's selfie-posting behavior on Social Networking Sites such as Facebook and interest in the comments they receive back.

Factors associated with good heart health may also protect kidneys
Achieving the American Heart Association's definition of ideal cardiovascular health may also help prevent chronic kidney disease, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

A warming climate puts Europe at risk for seasonal outbreaks of dengue fever
Increasing temperatures will enlarge Europe's seasonal window for the potential spread of mosquito-borne viral disease, expanding the geographic areas at risk for a dengue epidemic to include much of Europe.

Texas A&M study shows saturated fats 'jet lag' body clocks, triggering metabolic disorders
It makes sense that people who are trying to slim down would avoid fats. But as anyone who has unsuccessfully tried this approach to dieting knows, it's not quite that simple.

Vanderbilt researchers identify potent antibodies against HIV
It's been known for some time that the immune system can produce antibodies capable of "neutralizing" HIV, and stopping the AIDS-causing virus dead in its tracks.

Brain connectivity disruptions may explain cognitive deficits in people with brain injury
Cognitive impairment following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common, often adversely affecting quality of life for those 1.7 million Americans who experience a TBI each year.

Nanopillars on drone fly larvae allow them to avoid bacterial contamination
The immature stage of the drone fly (Eristalis tenax) is known as a "rat-tailed maggot" because it resembles a hairless baby rodent with a "tail" that is actually used as a breathing tube.

Scientists make significant anti-aging breakthrough
A breakthrough in understanding human skin cells offers a pathway for new anti-ageing treatments.

Proof that ancient supernovae zapped Earth sparks hunt for after effects
Two new papers appearing in the journal Nature this week are "slam-dunk" evidence that energies from supernovae have buffeted our planet, according to astrophysicist Adrian Melott of the University of Kansas.

Advance may make quantum computing more practical
Quantum computers are largely hypothetical devices that could perform some calculations much more rapidly than conventional computers can.

Climate change speeds up gully erosion
The erosion of large natural channels by flowing water -- gully erosion -- can wreak havoc on fields, roads, and buildings.

Large variations in precipitation over the past millennium
According to a new study in Nature, the Northern Hemisphere has experienced considerably larger variations in precipitation during the past twelve centuries than in the twentieth century.

Respirator mask reduces effects of pollution on the heart
The use of a respiratory filter mask, a common practice in China and Japan, among other countries, helps minimize the impact of pollution on people with heart failure during rush-hour traffic in cities such as São Paulo, Brazil.

'Informed consent' states often give women considering abortions inaccurate information
Women considering abortions are getting medically inaccurate information nearly a third of the time in states that require doctors to provide informed consent materials to their patients, according to a Rutgers study.

Cancer patients with limited finances are more likely to have increased symptoms and poorer quality
If you're a lung or colorectal cancer patient, what's in your wallet could determine your level of suffering and quality of life during treatment, according to a new study by Dana Farber Cancer Institute researchers.

Plankton feces could move plastic pollution to the ocean depths
Plastic waste could find its way deep into the ocean through the faeces of plankton, new research from the University of Exeter and Plymouth Marine Laboratory shows.

Sacubitril/valsartan in chronic heart failure: Indication of considerable added benefit
The fixed-dose combination of sacubitril and valsartan (trade name: Entresto) has been approved since November 2015 for adults with symptomatic chronic heart failure with reduced pump function (ejection fraction).

Invasive species not best conservation tool: Study
Harnessing an invasive fish species sounded like a promising conservation tool to help reverse the destruction wreaked by zebra mussels on endangered native mollusks in the Great Lakes - except that it won't work, says a University of Guelph ecologist.

Study of enzymatic chemical reactions may indicate how the first cells formed colonies
A novel investigation of how enzymatic reactions can direct the motion and organization of microcapsules may point toward a new theory of how protocells - the earliest biological cells - could have organized into colonies and thus, could have ultimately formed larger, differentiated structures.

SMFM releases statement on use of antenatal corticosteroids in late preterm birth period
The Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine released a statement on the use of antenatal corticosteroids during the late preterm birth period for women at risk of preterm birth.

New national study finds Crohn's disease diagnosis difficult to obtain and life altering
In a new national survey of Crohn's disease patients, Health Union reveals that it was not uncommon for patients to see multiple healthcare professionals (HCPs), have numerous office visits, and endure multiple diagnostic tests before receiving a diagnosis.

Duke study uncovers genetic elements that drive regeneration
If you trace our evolutionary tree way back to its roots -- long before the shedding of gills or the development of opposable thumbs -- you will likely find a common ancestor with the amazing ability to regenerate lost body parts.

How bioceramics could help fight gum disease
Severe gum disease known as periodontitis can lead to tooth loss, and treating it remains a challenge. But new approaches involving silicon nitride, a ceramic material used in spinal implants, could be on the way.

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