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The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past month
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Scientists discover C4 photosynthesis boosts growth by altering size and structure of plant leaves and roots
Plants using C4 photosynthesis grow 20-100 per cent quicker than more common C3 plants by altering the shape, size and structure of their leaves and roots, according to a new study.

Smartphone users are redefining privacy in public spaces
Private v. public, virtual v. real have converged in a world saturated by information technology. It seems impossible to divide the public from the personal. But when and where do we choose to share information about ourselves?



Researchers transmit data through animal tissues at HD video rates via ultrasound
Using animal tissue samples--store-bought pork loin and beef liver--researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated the possibility of real-time video-rate data transmission through tissue for in-body ultrasonic communications with implanted medical devices.

Curious new bush species growing 'bleeding' fruits named by a US class of 150 7th graders
A class of 150 US 7th graders has helped select a name for a newly discovered plant, which amazes with its fruits that appear to be bleeding once they are cut open.

Atmospheric aerosols can significantly cool down climate
It is possible to significantly slow down and even temporarily stop the progression of global warming by increasing the atmospheric aerosol concentration, shows a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. However, climate engineering does not remove the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Scientists ID genes connected to wellbeing, depression and neuroticism
An international group of more than 190 scientists who analyzed the genomes of 298,420 individuals have found genetic variants that may influence our sense of wellbeing, depression and neuroticism.

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016 Experimental drug guadecitabine found safe in patients with colorectal cancer
In a small, phase I clinical trial, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers say they show for the first time that the experimental drug guadecitabine (SGI-110) is safe in combination with the chemotherapy drug irinotecan and may overcome resistance to irinotecan in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

Space mission first to observe key interaction between magnetic fields of Earth and sun
Most people do not give much thought to the Earth's magnetic field, yet it is every bit as essential to life as air, water and sunlight.

Compound from hops lowers cholesterol, blood sugar and weight gain
A recent study at Oregon State University has identified specific intake levels of xanthohumol, a natural flavonoid found in hops, that significantly improved some of the underlying markers of metabolic syndrome in laboratory animals and also reduced weight gain.

New computer program can help uncover hidden genomic alterations that drive cancers
Cancer is rarely the result of a single mutation in a single gene.

Could global warming's top culprit help crops?
Many scientists fear that global warming will hit staple food crops hard, with heat stress, extreme weather events and water shortages.

Trees' internal water pipes predict which species survive drought
Massive tree die-offs due to drought have ravaged forests across the American West and left ecologists struggling to predict how and when tree deaths will happen, and how rising temperatures due to climate change might affect the health of forests.

Additional benefits of type 2 diabetes treatment found for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients
A type 2 diabetes treatment has been found to also have 'off-label' benefits for glucose control in the liver and in fatty cells known as adipose.

Lowered birth rates one reason why women outlive men
Using unique demographic records on 140,600 reproducing individuals from the Utah Population Database, a research team led from Uppsala University has come to the conclusion that lowered birth rates are one reason why women outlive men in today's societies. The study is published in Scientific Reports.

Unexpected discovery leads to a better battery
An unexpected discovery has led to a rechargeable battery that's as inexpensive as conventional car batteries, but has a much higher energy density.

High levels of protein p62 predict liver cancer recurrence
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have discovered that high levels of the protein p62 in human liver samples are strongly associated with cancer recurrence and reduced patient survival. In mice, they also found that p62 is required for liver cancer to form.

30 years after Chernobyl, UGA camera study reveals wildlife abundance in CEZ
Thirty years ago, the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Pripyat, Ukraine, became the site of the world's largest nuclear accident.

Phosphorus 'tax' could be huge if tropical farming intensifies
One way to feed the globe's growing population is to ramp up intensive farming in tropical regions, but doing so will require a lot of fertilizer -- particularly phosphorus.

AACR: Results from clinical trial of personalized cellular therapy in brain tumors
Immune cells engineered to seek out and attack a type of deadly brain cancer known as glioblastoma (GBM) were found to have an acceptable safety profile and successfully migrate to and infiltrate tumors, researchers from Penn Medicine and Harvard University reported at the AACR Annual Meeting 2016 (Abstract LB-083).

Technique could help identify patients who would suffer chemo-induced heart damage
Cancer patients who receive a particular type of chemotherapy called doxorubicin run a risk of sustaining severe, lasting heart damage. But it is not possible to predict who is likely to experience this serious side effect. It is also unknown exactly how the drug damages heart muscle.

Sonic hedgehog gene provides evidence that our limbs may have evolved from sharks' gills
Latest analysis shows that human limbs share a genetic programme with the gills of cartilaginous fishes such as sharks and skates, providing evidence to support a century-old theory on the origin of limbs that had been widely discounted.

Kids' eating habits highlight need for healthier lunchboxes
New research from the University of Adelaide in Australia shows children aged 9-10 years old are receiving almost half of their daily energy requirements from "discretionary" or junk foods.

New research from Yale and MIT describes bioreactor to support whole lung regeneration
An innovative mechanical system that mimics the ventilation and blood flow in the chest cavity, housed in a specialized, sterile bioreactor, can support the growth of engineered whole lungs at human scale.

Hormone may offer new approach to type 2 diabetes
Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and Oxford University have found a hormone that may offer an effective treatment for type 2 diabetes.

Delaying radiation therapy for women with very early breast cancer ups recurrence
Delaying radiation therapy too long after surgery significantly increases the risk of recurrent tumors in women treated for very early, or what is referred to as "stage 0," breast cancer, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Transplanted nerve cells survive a quarter of a century in a Parkinson's disease patient
In the late 1980s and over the 1990s, researchers at Lund University in Sweden pioneered the transplantation of new nerve cells into the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease.

Precision prevention of colorectal cancer
Precision medicine's public face is that of disease -- and better treatments for that disease through targeted therapies.

Newly discovered vulnerability in breast tumor cells points to new cancer treatment path
Cancer cells often devise ways to survive even in the presence of toxic chemotherapy. Now, a research team led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) has found a way to attack a process that tumor cells use to escape the effects of standard cancer drugs.

36,000 children already tested for early type 1 diabetes
One year after the introduction of the Bavarian pilot project Fr1da, the Institute of Diabetes Research, Helmholtz Zentrum München has published the first results in the BMJ Open journal.

First computer program developed to detect DNA mutations in single cancer cells
Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have announced a new method for detecting DNA mutations in a single cancer cell versus current technology that analyzes millions of cells which they believe could have important applications for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

Researchers find possible treatment for suppressed immunity from spine injuries
Scientists report in Nature Neuroscience they have identified an underlying cause of dangerous immune suppression in people with high level spinal cord injuries and they propose a possible treatment.

NASA's Fermi telescope poised to pin down gravitational wave sources
On Sept. 14, waves of energy traveling for more than a billion years gently rattled space-time in the vicinity of Earth.

Research discovers mechanism that causes cancer cells to escape from the immune system
Under normal circumstances, the immune system recognizes and successfully fights cancer cells, eliminating them as they develop.

Protein found to play key role in the spread of pancreatic cancer
Researchers from the University of Liverpool working with colleagues from around the globe have found an explanation for how pancreatic cancer spreads to the liver. These findings potentially hold the key to stopping this disease from spreading.

Double advantage of potential new diabetes treatment
Blocking the hormone that raises sugar levels in the blood could increase insulin levels while keeping blood sugar levels down.

Study identifies specific work factors that predict sleep problems
A new study found that specific psychological and social work factors were associated with sleep problems both concurrently and two years after exposure, indicating prolonged consequences.

Seeking to rewind mammalian extinction
In December 2015 an international group of scientists convened in Austria to discuss the imminent extinction of the northern white rhinoceros and the possibility of bringing the species back from brink of extinction.

NASA satellite data could help reduce flights sidelined by volcanic eruptions
A volcano erupting and spewing ash into the sky can cover nearby areas under a thick coating of ash and can also have consequences for aviation safety.

Nature Photonics: Light source for quicker computer chips
Worldwide growing data volumes make conventional electronic processing reach its limits.

Discovery of enzyme in the sleeping sickness parasite streamlines drug development
Researchers from Umeå University in Sweden have discovered that the single-celled parasite causing African sleeping sickness has a defence mechanism against potential pharmaceuticals under development against the disease.

Rare pediatric cancer successfully treated with new targeted therapy
When a baby's life was threatened by a rare pediatric cancer that would not respond to surgery or chemotherapy, doctors at Nemours Children's Hospital rapidly, successfully shrank the tumor by 90 percent using an experimental treatment, according to a new study published online in Pediatric Blood and Cancer.

Study suggests medical errors now third leading cause of death in the US
Analyzing medical death rate data over an eight-year period, Johns Hopkins patient safety experts have calculated that more than 250,000 deaths per year are due to medical error in the U.S.

Unsafe sex is fastest-growing risk for ill health in teens
The Lancet Commission's groundbreaking report released today, "Our Future: A Lancet Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing," finds that years of neglect and underinvestment have had serious detrimental effects on the health and wellbeing of adolescents aged 10-24 years.

Protein may predict response to immunotherapy in patients with metastatic melanoma
A protein called Bim may hold the clue to which patients may be successful on immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma, according to the results of a study by Mayo Clinic researchers led by senior author Haidong Dong, M.D., Ph.D., and published online in the May 5 edition of JCI Insight.

Promising new compound protects neurons and vision in mice with glaucoma
Early tests of a novel compound in mice with glaucoma should come as welcome news to millions of people around the world now suffering with this leading cause of vision loss.

Preeminent experts provide roadmap for future melanoma research
Recently the Melanoma Research Foundation (MRF) convened a summit of internationally-renowned melanoma experts for an in-depth discussion on the current understanding of, and future recommendations for, melanoma research.

Islet transplantation restores blood sugar awareness and control in type 1 diabetes
New clinical trial results show that transplantation of pancreatic islets--cell clusters that contain insulin-producing cells--prevents severe, potentially life-threatening drops in blood sugar in people with type 1 diabetes.

Number of HIV infections falling in United States, but fails to meet reduction goals
The number of new HIV infections occurring annually in the United States decreased by an estimated 11 percent from 2010 to 2015, while the HIV transmission rate decreased by an estimated 17 percent during the same time period, according to new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the University of Pennsylvania.

Smoking and schizophrenia: Understanding and breaking the cycle of addiction
Smoking addiction in schizophrenia can be explained by significantly increased activation of the ventro-medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), a region involved in the brain reward system.

New optogenetic tool moves proteins within cells to study biological changes
Scientists at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have developed a way to embed light-responsive switches into proteins so that researchers can use lasers to manipulate protein movement and activity within living cells and animals.

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