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The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past month
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Study recommends ongoing assessment of impact of offshore wind farms on marine species
Offshore wind power is a valuable source of renewable energy that can help reduce carbon emissions.

New way to detox? 'Gold of Pleasure' oilseed boosts liver detoxification enzymes
University of Illinois scientists have found compounds that boost liver detoxification enzymes nearly fivefold, and they've found them in a pretty unlikely place-the crushed seeds left after oil extraction from an oilseed crop used in jet fuel.



Miriam Hospital study finds smoking during pregnancy alters newborn stress hormones and DNA
Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have studied the effects of smoking during pregnancy and its impact on the stress response in newborn babies.

Yale Journal: How, When, and Why Industrial Ecology is Good for Business
Industrial ecology, a rapidly growing field focused on sustainable production and consumption, has contributed numerous important tools to modern environmental management - life cycle assessment; "industrial symbiosis," or the by-product exchange between neighboring facilities; "design for environment"; and the use of material flow analysis to track resource use in supply chains, companies, and economies.

Advanced X-ray, neutron beam imaging reveal workings of powerful biochemical switch PKA
A University of Utah-led study using X-rays and neutron beams has revealed the inner workings of a master switch that regulates basic cellular functions, but that also, when mutated, contributes to cancer, cardiovascular disease and other deadly disorders.

Batteries included: A solar cell that stores its own power
Is it a solar cell? Or a rechargeable battery? Actually, the patent-pending device invented at The Ohio State University is both: the world's first solar battery.

Fly genome could help us improve health and our environment
The house fly might be a worldwide pest, but its genome will provide information that could improve our lives. From insights into pathogen immunity, to pest control and decomposing waste, the 691 Mb genome has been sequenced and analyzed by a global consortium of scientists, and is published in the open access journal Genome Biology.

UMN research pinpoints microRNA tied to colon cancer tumor growth
Researchers at the University of Minnesota have identified microRNAs that may cause colon polyps from turning cancerous. The finding could help physicians provide more specialized, and earlier, treatment before colon cancer develops.

Adenosine can melt 'love handles'
The number of overweight persons is greatly increasing worldwide - and as a result is the risk of suffering a heart attack, stroke, diabetes or Alzheimer's disease.

Rating the Planet's Oceans
The most comprehensive assessment conducted by the Ocean Health Index rates the Earth's oceans at 67 out of 100 in overall health.

Moderate Levels of 'Free Radicals' Found Beneficial to Healing Wounds
Long assumed to be destructive to tissues and cells, "free radicals" generated by the cell's mitochondria-the energy producing structures in the cell-are actually beneficial to healing wounds.

Set of molecules found to link insulin resistance in the brain to diabetes
A key mechanism behind diabetes may start in the brain, with early signs of the disease detectable through rising levels of molecules not previously linked to insulin signaling, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai published today in the journal Cell Metabolism.

Smallest world record has 'endless possibilities' for bio-nanotechnology
Scientists from the University of Leeds have taken a crucial step forward in bio-nanotechnology, a field that uses biology to develop new tools for science, technology and medicine.

The mathematics behind the Ebola epidemic
Researchers in the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering at ETH Zurich have calculated new benchmark figures to precisely describe the Ebola epidemic in West Africa from a mathematical perspective. Their results may help health authorities to contain the epidemic.

Australia's high survival rates shed doubt on global sepsis guidelines
New research suggests treatment in Australia and New Zealand for patients with sepsis is the best in the world.

Researchers discover gene that can predict aggressive prostate cancer at diagnosis
Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have identified a biomarker living next door to the KLK3 gene that can predict which GS7 prostate cancer patients will have a more aggressive form of cancer.

Low birth rates can actually pay off in the US and other countries
As birth rates decline in countries that include parts of Europe and East Asia, threatening the economic slowdown associated with aging populations, a global study from the University of California, Berkeley, and the East-West Center in Hawaii suggests that in much of the world, it actually pays to have fewer children.

Window on the ocean's past
As a child in southern California, Ryan Rykaczewski spent a fair amount of time on his grandfather's boat, fishing with him off the Pacific coast near Los Angeles. At the time, he didn't think there was much rhyme or reason to their luck on the water.

Researchers identify early sign of pancreatic cancer
Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and other institutions have discovered a sign of the early development of pancreatic cancer - an upsurge in certain amino acids that occurs before the disease is diagnosed and symptoms appear.

Leaky, Star-Forming Galaxies Lead Johns Hopkins Researchers to Better Understand the Universe
By focusing on large, star-forming galaxies in the universe, researchers at Johns Hopkins University were able to measure its radiation leaks in an effort to better understand how the universe evolved as the first stars were formed.

Managers can boost creativity by 'empowering leadership' and earning employees' trust
Managers can promote creativity in employees by "empowering leadership" and earning employees' trust, according to a new study by Rice University and American University.

Scientists discover a 'good' fat that fights diabetes
Scientists at the Salk Institute and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) in Boston have discovered a new class of molecules-produced in human and mouse fat-that protects against diabetes.

Formation and large scale confinement of jets emitted by young stars elucidated
An international team of scientists has succeeded in explaining the formation and propagation over astronomical distances of jetsof matter emitted by young stars-one of the most fascinating mysteries of modern astronomy.

Evolutionary biology: It's not just for textbooks anymore
Solving global challenges in food security, emerging diseases and biodiversity loss requires evolutionary thinking, argues a new study published online in Science Express that was co-authored by Bruce Tabashnik of the University of Arizona College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

Findings point to an 'off switch' for drug resistance in cancer
Like a colony of bacteria or species of animals, cancer cells within a tumor must evolve to survive.

A discovery could prevent the development of brain tumours in children
Scientists at the IRCM discovered a mechanism that promotes the progression of medulloblastoma, the most common brain tumour found in children.

What's Your Status?
In western society, where keeping up with the Joneses - or, better yet, surpassing them - is expected and even encouraged, status matters.

River flow by design: environmental flows support ecosystem services in rivers natural and novel
Last spring, the Colorado River reached its delta for the first time in 16 years, flowing into Pacific Ocean at the Gulf of California after wetting 70 miles of long-dry channels through the Sonoran Desert.

To help solve slums, innovators build jobs, food security into affordable housing blueprints
Building on the poverty relief success achieved through self-sustaining high-tech "smart villages," Malaysian innovators have created blueprints for an urban counterpart that combines affordable homes, food security and sustainable jobs, aiming to solve the growing global problem of squalid city slums.

Princeton scientists observe elusive particle that is its own antiparticle
Princeton University scientists have observed an exotic particle that behaves simultaneously like matter and antimatter, a feat of math and engineering that could yield powerful computers based on quantum mechanics.

Stopping liver cancer in its tracks
A University of Tokyo research group has discovered that AIM (Apoptosis Inhibitor of Macrophage), a protein that plays a preventive role in obesity progression, can also prevent tumor development in mice liver cells.

New pill-only regimens cure patients with hardest-to-treat hepatitis C infection
Two new pill-only regimens that rapidly cure most patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C (HCV) infection could soon be widely prescribed across Europe.

Thermotolerant yeast can provide more climate-smart ethanol
With a simple mutation, yeast can grow in higher than normal temperatures. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology demonstrate this in an article to be published in the scientific journal Science.

A Heartbeat Away? Hybrid
Because heart cells cannot multiply and cardiac muscles contain few stem cells, heart tissue is unable to repair itself after a heart attack.

Targeted treatment could halt womb cancer growth
A drug which targets a key gene fault could halt an aggressive womb cancer and shrink tumours, according to research published in the British Journal of Cancer.

Lizards in the Caribbean - how geography affects animal evolution
A new and potentially more revealing way of studying how animal evolution is affected by the geography of climate has been designed by researchers at The University of Nottingham and Harvard University.

Examining terrorist propaganda
New research out of Queen's University could give insight into what terrorists are thinking. Professor David Skillicorn (School of Computing) analyzed language used in two jihadist magazines to gain intelligence about terrorist strategy.

Divide and conquer: Novel trick helps rare pathogen infect healthy people
New research into a rare pathogen has shown how a unique evolutionary trait allows it to infect even the healthiest of hosts through a smart solution to the body's immune response against it.

CNIO researchers associate 2 oncogenes with the agressiveness and incidence of leukaemia in mice
Proteins regulating cell division determine tumour growth. Ongoing clinical trials are currently studying inhibitors for two of these proteins, Cdk4 and Cdk6, targeting several types of cancer, such as breast cancer, lung cancer and leukaemia.

Immune cells in the liver drive fatty liver disease and liver cancer
Immune cells that migrate to the liver and interact there with liver tissue cells get activated by metabolic stress (e.g. through lipids of a high fat diet) and drive the development of fatty liver disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and liver cancer.

That pregnant feeling makes a fly start nesting
Across the animal kingdom, it's not uncommon for pregnancy to change an expectant mom's behavior.

Diet affects mix of intestinal bacteria and the risk of inflammatory bone disease
Diet-induced changes in the gut's bacterial ecosystem can alter susceptibility to an autoinflammatory bone disease by modifying the immune response, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists reported.

New approach can predict impact of climate change on species that can't get out of the way
When scientists talk about the consequences of climate change, it can mean more than how we human beings will be impacted by higher temperatures, rising seas and serious storms. Plants and trees are also feeling the change, but they can't move out of the way.

Exercise linked with improved physical and mental health among dialysis patients
Aerobic physical activity is strongly linked with better health-related quality of life, fewer depressive symptoms, and prolonged life in kidney failure patients on dialysis.

Making oxygen before life
About one-fifth of the Earth's atmosphere is oxygen, pumped out by green plants as a result of photosynthesis and used by most living things on the planet to keep our metabolisms running.

Laying siege to beta-amyloid, the key protein in Alzheimer's disease
The peptide -a small protein- beta-amyloid is strongly associated with Alzheimer's disease; however, researchers are still looking for unequivocal proof that this peptide is the causal agent of the onset and development of the disease.

DNA 'bias' may keep some diseases in circulation, Penn biologists show
It's an early lesson in genetics: we get half our DNA from Mom, half from Dad.

Space-based methane maps find largest US signal in Southwest
An unexpectedly high amount of the climate-changing gas methane, the main component of natural gas, is escaping from the Four Corners region in the U.S. Southwest, according to a new study by the University of Michigan and NASA.

Study of mountain lion energetics shows the power of the pounce
Scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz, using a new wildlife tracking collar they developed, were able to continuously monitor the movements of mountain lions in the wild and determine how much energy the big cats use to stalk, pounce, and overpower their prey.

In-depth analysis of bat influenza viruses concludes they pose low risk to humans
Zoonosis-transmission of infections from other vertebrates to humans-causes regular and sometimes serious disease outbreaks.

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