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The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past month
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Wind energy provides 8 percent of Europe's electricity
EU's grid connected cumulative capacity in 2014 reached 129 GW, meeting 8% of European electricity demand, equivalent to the combined annual consumption of Belgium, the Netherlands, Greece and Ireland.

Marine plankton brighten clouds over Southern Ocean
New research using NASA satellite data and ocean biology models suggests tiny organisms in vast stretches of the Southern Ocean play a significant role in generating brighter clouds overhead.



Breastfeeding may expose infants to toxic chemicals
A widely used class of industrial chemicals linked with cancer and interference with immune function--perfluorinated alkylate substances, or PFASs--appears to build up in infants by 20%-30% for each month they're breastfed, according to a new study co-authored by experts from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Surprising results casts new light on the free radical theory of aging
When scientists in the Campisi lab at the Buck Institute bred mice that produced excess free radicals that damaged the mitochondria in their skin, they expected to see accelerated aging across the mouse lifespan - additional proof of the free radical theory of aging.

Further evidence of genetic key to deadliest form of skin cancer
Scientists from the University of Leeds have uncovered further evidence that the protective buffers at the ends of chromosomes - known as telomeres - are fundamental to the understanding of the deadliest form of skin cancer, melanoma.

New approach for making vaccines for deadly diseases
Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have devised an entirely new approach to vaccines - creating immunity without vaccination.

Nanoparticles used to breach mucus barrier in lungs
Nanotechnology could one day provide an inhaled vehicle to deliver targeted therapeutic genes for those suffering from life-threatening lung disorders.

Gene therapy may improve survival of patients with recurrent ovarian cancer
Use of gene therapy to deliver a protein that suppresses the development of female reproductive organs may improve the survival of patients with ovarian cancer that has recurred after chemotherapy, which happens 70 percent of the time and is invariably fatal.

Early evidence suggests hybrid cochlear implants may benefit millions with common form of hearing loss
People with a common form of hearing loss not helped by hearing aids achieved significant and sometimes profound improvements in their hearing and understanding of speech with hybrid cochlear implant devices, according to a new multicenter study led by specialists at NYU Langone Medical Center.

Better together: Graphene-nanotube hybrid switches
Graphene has been called a wonder material, capable of performing great and unusual material acrobatics. Boron nitride nanotubes are no slackers in the materials realm either, and can be engineered for physical and biological applications.

4 million years at Africa's salad bar
As grasses grew more common in Africa, most major mammal groups tried grazing on them at times during the past 4 million years, but some of the animals went extinct or switched back to browsing on trees and shrubs, according to a study led by the University of Utah.

Head impacts and collegiate football practice and games
Researchers at the University of Virginia (UVa) examined the number and severity of subconcussive head impacts sustained by college football players over an entire season during practices and games.

CU-Boulder researchers use wastewater treatment to capture CO2, produce energy
Cleaning up municipal and industrial wastewater can be dirty business, but engineers at the University of Colorado Boulder have developed an innovative wastewater treatment process that not only mitigates carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, but actively captures greenhouse gases as well.

Addressing social factors critical for continued fight against heart disease and stroke in America
Deaths from heart attacks, strokes and other heart diseases have been declining, but social factors, including race, income, environment and education could reverse that trend according to a first of its kind scientific statement from the American Heart Association.

Parasitic flatworms flout global biodiversity patterns
The odds of being attacked and castrated by a variety of parasitic flatworms increases for marine horn snails the farther they are found from the tropics.

Cassiopeia's hidden gem: The closest rocky, transiting planet
Skygazers at northern latitudes are familiar with the W-shaped star pattern of Cassiopeia the Queen. This circumpolar constellation is visible year-round near the North Star. Tucked next to one leg of the W lies a modest 5th-magnitude star named HD 219134 that has been hiding a secret.

Harvard's Wyss Institute improves its sepsis therapeutic device
Last year, a Wyss Institute team of scientists described the development of a new device to treat sepsis that works by mimicking our spleen. It cleanses pathogens and toxins from blood circulating through a dialysis-like circuit.

Muscle fibers grown in the lab offer new model for studying muscular dystrophy
Skeletal muscle is one of the most abundant tissue types in the human body, but has proven difficult to produce in large quantities in the lab.

New study reveals both benefits and risks of antidepressants during pregnancy
Treating maternal psychiatric disorder with commonly used antidepressants is associated with a lower risk of certain pregnancy complications including preterm birth and delivery by Caesarean section, according to researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University Medical Center, and the New York State Psychiatric Institute.

If you purchase an embarrassing product online, do you still blush? New study says yes
Published research and common knowledge suggest that embarrassment is something we experience only when we are around other people.

CO2 removal cannot save the oceans -- if we pursue business as usual
Greenhouse-gas emissions from human activities do not only cause rapid warming of the seas, but also ocean acidification at an unprecedented rate.

Fly brains filter out visual information caused by their own movements, like humans
Our brains are constantly barraged with sensory information, but have an amazing ability to filter out just what they need to understand what's going on around us.

Unsuccessful fertility treatments not linked with clinically diagnosed depression in women
An analysis of data on more than 41,000 Danish women who received assisted reproductive fertility treatment shows that unsuccessful treatment is not linked with an increased risk of clinically diagnosed depression compared with successful treatment.

Look into my pupils: Pupil mimicry may lead to increased trust
People often mimic each other's facial expressions or postures without even knowing it, but new research shows that they also mimic the size of each other's pupils, which can lead to increased trust.

Small tilt in magnets makes them viable memory chips
University of California, Berkeley, researchers have discovered a new way to switch the polarization of nanomagnets, paving the way for high-density storage to move from hard disks onto integrated circuits.

Trauma experiences change the brain even in those without PTSD
Trauma may cause distinct and long-lasting effects even in people who do not develop PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder), according to research by scientists working at the University of Oxford's Department of Psychiatry.

Stanford researchers genetically engineer yeast to produce opioids
For thousands of years, people have used yeast to ferment wine, brew beer and leaven bread.

High-dose vitamin D supplementation not associated with benefits for postmenopausal women
High-dose vitamin D supplementation in postmenopausal women was not associated with beneficial effects on bone mineral density, muscle function, muscle mass or falls, according to the results of a randomized clinical trial published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Toward a safe antiobesity drug that could block fat absorption
To help address the global obesity epidemic, scientists are developing a new class of compounds called "micelle sequestrant polymers," or MSPs, that could prevent fat particles from getting absorbed in the body and thus potentially reduce weight gain.

Yo-yo dieting not associated with increased cancer risk
The first comprehensive study of its kind finds weight cycling, repeated cycles of intentional weight loss followed by regain, was not associated with overall risk of cancer in men or women.

Employee health codes of conduct
Workplace wellness can be a positive source of health and empowerment for employees.

Mutant cells that can't copy DNA keep dividing when they shouldn't
Researchers at USC have developed a yeast model to study a gene mutation that disrupts the duplication of DNA, causing massive damage to a cell's chromosomes, while somehow allowing the cell to continue dividing.

Basis for new treatment options for a fatal leukemia in children revealed
Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common type of cancer in children. It can occur in various forms, differing not only by specific changes in the genetic material of the leukemia cells but also by their response to therapies.

Earliest evidence of reproduction in a complex organism
Researchers led by the University of Cambridge have found the earliest example of reproduction in a complex organism.

Canadian study sheds surprising light on the causes of cerebral palsy
Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common cause of physical disability in children. It has historically been considered to be caused by factors such as birth asphyxia, stroke and infections in the developing brain of babies.

Greenhouse gases' millennia-long ocean legacy
Continuing current carbon dioxide (CO2) emission trends throughout this century and beyond would leave a legacy of heat and acidity in the deep ocean.

Public Release: 20-Aug-2015 Carnegie Mellon-led team identifies structure of tumor-suppressing protein
An international group of researchers led by Carnegie Mellon University physicists Mathias Lösche and Frank Heinrich have established the structure of an important tumor suppressing protein, PTEN. Their findings provide new insights into how the protein regulates cell growth and how mutations in the gene that encodes the protein can lead to cancer.

Ocean changes are affecting salmon biodiversity and survival
The biodiversity of two Northern Pacific salmon species may be at risk due to changes in ocean conditions at the equator, reports a study by the University of California, Davis.

The result of eating too much salt can be measured in blood pressure
People who gradually increase the amount of salt in their diet and people who habitually eat a higher salt diet both face an increased risk of developing high blood pressure, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Tiny grains of rice hold big promise for greenhouse gas reductions, bioenergy
Rice serves as the staple food for more than half of the world's population, but it's also the one of the largest manmade sources of atmospheric methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

Low levels of endocrine disruptors in the environment may cause sex reversal in female frogs
Many studies have been conducted on the dangers of endocrine disrupting chemicals that mimic or block estrogen, the primary female hormone.

Big data maps world's ocean floor
Scientists from the University of Sydney's School of Geosciences have led the creation of the world's first digital map of the seafloor's geology.

Artificial blood vessels become resistant to thrombosis
Scientists from ITMO University developed artificial blood vessels that are not susceptible to blood clot formation.

Chronic insomnia sufferers may find relief with half of standard pill dose
The roughly nine million Americans who rely on prescription sleeping pills to treat chronic insomnia may be able to get relief from as little as half of the drugs, and may even be helped by taking placebos in the treatment plan, according to new research published today in the journal Sleep Medicine by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Hospital penalties based on total number of blood clots may be unfairly imposed
Johns Hopkins researchers say their review of 128 medical case histories suggests that financial penalties imposed on Maryland hospitals based solely on the total number of patients who suffer blood clots in the lung or leg fail to account for clots that occur despite the consistent and proper use of the best preventive therapies.

Stress responder is a first responder in helping repair DNA damage and avoiding cancer
DNA damage increases the risk of cancer, and researchers have found that a protein, known to rally when cells get stressed, plays a critical, early step in its repair.

Global vaccine-development fund could save thousands of lives, billions of dollars
Ebola is a preventable disease, and yet a safe and effective vaccine has not been deployed. As with many vaccines, financial barriers persist: pharmaceutical companies see high costs with limited market potential, and government support is lacking.

In CRISPR advance, scientists successfully edit human T cells
In a project spearheaded by investigators at UC San Francisco, scientists have devised a new strategy to precisely modify human T cells using the genome-editing system known as CRISPR/Cas9.

Overcoming why a new treatment is resisted by lung cancer
A promising agent for the treatment of cancer has so far had little effect on the most common lung tumours, but new research from The University of Manchester has suggested how this resistance might be overcome.

Study calculates the speed of ice formation
Researchers at Princeton University have for the first time directly calculated the rate at which water crystallizes into ice in a realistic computer model of water molecules.

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