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The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past month
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Study recommends ongoing assessment of impact of offshore wind farms on marine species
Offshore wind power is a valuable source of renewable energy that can help reduce carbon emissions.

Miriam Hospital study finds smoking during pregnancy alters newborn stress hormones and DNA
Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have studied the effects of smoking during pregnancy and its impact on the stress response in newborn babies.



Prostate cancer risk reduced by sleeping with many women, but increased with many men
Compared to men who have had only one partner during their lifetime, having sex with more than 20 women is associated with a 28% lower risk of one day being diagnosed with prostate cancer, according to researchers at the University of Montreal and INRS - Institut Armand-Frappier.

Yale Journal: How, When, and Why Industrial Ecology is Good for Business
Industrial ecology, a rapidly growing field focused on sustainable production and consumption, has contributed numerous important tools to modern environmental management - life cycle assessment; "industrial symbiosis," or the by-product exchange between neighboring facilities; "design for environment"; and the use of material flow analysis to track resource use in supply chains, companies, and economies.

Advanced X-ray, neutron beam imaging reveal workings of powerful biochemical switch PKA
A University of Utah-led study using X-rays and neutron beams has revealed the inner workings of a master switch that regulates basic cellular functions, but that also, when mutated, contributes to cancer, cardiovascular disease and other deadly disorders.

Fly genome could help us improve health and our environment
The house fly might be a worldwide pest, but its genome will provide information that could improve our lives. From insights into pathogen immunity, to pest control and decomposing waste, the 691 Mb genome has been sequenced and analyzed by a global consortium of scientists, and is published in the open access journal Genome Biology.

Adenosine can melt 'love handles'
The number of overweight persons is greatly increasing worldwide - and as a result is the risk of suffering a heart attack, stroke, diabetes or Alzheimer's disease.

Moderate Levels of 'Free Radicals' Found Beneficial to Healing Wounds
Long assumed to be destructive to tissues and cells, "free radicals" generated by the cell's mitochondria-the energy producing structures in the cell-are actually beneficial to healing wounds.

Set of molecules found to link insulin resistance in the brain to diabetes
A key mechanism behind diabetes may start in the brain, with early signs of the disease detectable through rising levels of molecules not previously linked to insulin signaling, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai published today in the journal Cell Metabolism.

The mathematics behind the Ebola epidemic
Researchers in the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering at ETH Zurich have calculated new benchmark figures to precisely describe the Ebola epidemic in West Africa from a mathematical perspective. Their results may help health authorities to contain the epidemic.

Nation's 'personality' influences its environmental stewardship, shows new study
Countries with higher levels of compassion and openness score better when it comes to environmental sustainability, says research from the University of Toronto.

Genetic causes underlying the disqualification of 2 elite American Standardbred pacers
A DNA mutation that can lead to horses being genetically male, but female in appearance, may explain at least two cases of controversial sexual identity, according to research led by professors from the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM) and published in PLOS Genetics.

Smallest world record has 'endless possibilities' for bio-nanotechnology
Scientists from the University of Leeds have taken a crucial step forward in bio-nanotechnology, a field that uses biology to develop new tools for science, technology and medicine.

Findings point to an 'off switch' for drug resistance in cancer
Like a colony of bacteria or species of animals, cancer cells within a tumor must evolve to survive.

New pill-only regimens cure patients with hardest-to-treat hepatitis C infection
Two new pill-only regimens that rapidly cure most patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C (HCV) infection could soon be widely prescribed across Europe.

Low birth rates can actually pay off in the US and other countries
As birth rates decline in countries that include parts of Europe and East Asia, threatening the economic slowdown associated with aging populations, a global study from the University of California, Berkeley, and the East-West Center in Hawaii suggests that in much of the world, it actually pays to have fewer children.

Formation and large scale confinement of jets emitted by young stars elucidated
An international team of scientists has succeeded in explaining the formation and propagation over astronomical distances of jetsof matter emitted by young stars-one of the most fascinating mysteries of modern astronomy.

Managers can boost creativity by 'empowering leadership' and earning employees' trust
Managers can promote creativity in employees by "empowering leadership" and earning employees' trust, according to a new study by Rice University and American University.

When hearing aid users listen to music, less is more, says CU-Boulder study
The type of sound processing that modern hearings aids provide to make speech more understandable for wearers may also make music enjoyment more difficult, according to a new study by the University of Colorado Boulder.

River flow by design: environmental flows support ecosystem services in rivers natural and novel
Last spring, the Colorado River reached its delta for the first time in 16 years, flowing into Pacific Ocean at the Gulf of California after wetting 70 miles of long-dry channels through the Sonoran Desert.

Leaky, Star-Forming Galaxies Lead Johns Hopkins Researchers to Better Understand the Universe
By focusing on large, star-forming galaxies in the universe, researchers at Johns Hopkins University were able to measure its radiation leaks in an effort to better understand how the universe evolved as the first stars were formed.

Scientists discover a 'good' fat that fights diabetes
Scientists at the Salk Institute and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) in Boston have discovered a new class of molecules-produced in human and mouse fat-that protects against diabetes.

Lizards in the Caribbean - how geography affects animal evolution
A new and potentially more revealing way of studying how animal evolution is affected by the geography of climate has been designed by researchers at The University of Nottingham and Harvard University.

CNIO researchers associate 2 oncogenes with the agressiveness and incidence of leukaemia in mice
Proteins regulating cell division determine tumour growth. Ongoing clinical trials are currently studying inhibitors for two of these proteins, Cdk4 and Cdk6, targeting several types of cancer, such as breast cancer, lung cancer and leukaemia.

New insight on why people with Down syndrome invariably develop Alzheimer's disease
A new study by researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute reveals the process that leads to changes in the brains of individuals with Down syndrome-the same changes that cause dementia in Alzheimer's patients.

Immune cells in the liver drive fatty liver disease and liver cancer
Immune cells that migrate to the liver and interact there with liver tissue cells get activated by metabolic stress (e.g. through lipids of a high fat diet) and drive the development of fatty liver disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and liver cancer.

What's Your Status?
In western society, where keeping up with the Joneses - or, better yet, surpassing them - is expected and even encouraged, status matters.

Divide and conquer: Novel trick helps rare pathogen infect healthy people
New research into a rare pathogen has shown how a unique evolutionary trait allows it to infect even the healthiest of hosts through a smart solution to the body's immune response against it.

Academies call for consequences from the Ebola virus epidemic
The Ebola virus is spreading rapidly and to an unexpected extent. The outbreak does not follow the patterns experienced in the past and the virus shows a new disease dynamic in regions, where it has never been recorded before.

That pregnant feeling makes a fly start nesting
Across the animal kingdom, it's not uncommon for pregnancy to change an expectant mom's behavior.

NASA's Hubble Finds Extremely Distant Galaxy through Cosmic Magnifying Glass
Peering through a giant cosmic magnifying glass, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has spotted a tiny, faint galaxy -- one of the farthest galaxies ever seen. The diminutive object is estimated to be more than 13 billion light-years away.

How far urine flows in a tiny tube says a lot about your health
When you flush the toilet, you may be discarding microscopic warning signs about your health.

New Univeristy of Virginia study upends current theories of how mitochondria began
Parasitic bacteria were the first cousins of the mitochondria that power cells in animals and plants - and first acted as energy parasites in those cells before becoming beneficial, according to a new University of Virginia study that used next-generation DNA sequencing technologies to decode the genomes of 18 bacteria that are close relatives of mitochondria.

Leading lung health organizations release first-ever evidence-based patient care guidelines in prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD
The American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) and the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) announced today the release of Prevention of Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: American College of Chest Physicians and Canadian Thoracic Society Guideline in the journal CHEST.

New study shows the importance of jellyfish falls to deep-sea ecosystem
This week, researchers from University of Hawai'i, Norway, and the UK have shown with innovative experiments that a rise in jellyfish blooms near the ocean's surface may lead to jellyfish falls that are rapidly consumed by voracious deep-sea scavengers.

Examining terrorist propaganda
New research out of Queen's University could give insight into what terrorists are thinking. Professor David Skillicorn (School of Computing) analyzed language used in two jihadist magazines to gain intelligence about terrorist strategy.

Air pollution increases river-flows
A study published in Nature Geoscience shows that air pollution has had a significant impact on the amount of water flowing through many rivers in the northern hemisphere.

A global natural gas boom alone won't slow climate change
A new analysis of global energy use, economics and the climate shows that without new climate policies, expanding the current bounty of inexpensive natural gas alone would not slow the growth of global greenhouse gas emissions worldwide over the long term, according to a study appearing today in Nature.

Tarantula venom illuminates electrical activity in live cells
Researchers at the University of California, Davis, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, have created a cellular probe that combines a tarantula toxin with a fluorescent compound to help scientists observe electrical activity in neurons and other cells.

Space-based methane maps find largest US signal in Southwest
An unexpectedly high amount of the climate-changing gas methane, the main component of natural gas, is escaping from the Four Corners region in the U.S. Southwest, according to a new study by the University of Michigan and NASA.

Presence of enzyme may worsen effects of spinal cord injury and impair long-term recovery
Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition with few treatment options. Studies show that damage to the barrier separating blood from the spinal cord can contribute to the neurologic deficits that arise secondary to the initial trauma.

Probing the past
Using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope astronomers have made what may be the most reliable distance measurement yet of an object that existed in the Universe's formative years.

Getting the salt out
The boom in oil and gas produced through hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is seen as a boon for meeting U.S. energy needs.

Using a novel biological aging clock, UCLA researchers find obesity accelerates aging of the liver
Using a recently developed biomarker of aging known as an epigenetic clock, UCLA researchers working closely with a German team of investigators have found for the first time that obesity greatly accelerates aging of the liver.

Migrating animals' pee affects ocean chemistry
The largest migration on the planet is the movement of small animals from the surface of the open ocean, where they feed on plants under cover of darkness, to the sunless depths where they hide from predators during the day.

Ebola research shows rapid control interventions key factor in preventing spread
New Ebola research demonstrates that quick and forceful implementation of control interventions are necessary to control outbreaks and avoid far worse scenarios.

The Cichlids' Egg-Spots: How Evolution Creates new Characteristics
The evolution of new traits with novel functions has always posed a challenge to evolutionary biology. Studying the color markings of cichlid fish, Swiss scientists were now able to show what triggered these evolutionary innovations, namely: a mobile genetic element in the regulatory region of a color gene.

Brain's Compass Relies on Geometric Relationships, Say Penn Researchers
The brain has a complex system for keeping track of which direction you are facing as you move about; remembering how to get from one place to another would otherwise be impossible. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have now shown how the brain anchors this mental compass.

Study of identical twins reveals type 2 diabetes clues
By studying identical twins, researchers from Lund University in Sweden have identified mechanisms that could be behind the development of type 2 diabetes.

Tiny 'nanoflares' might heat the Sun's corona
Why is the Sun's million-degree corona, or outermost atmosphere, so much hotter than the Sun's surface? This question has baffled astronomers for decades.

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