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The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past month
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New study uses blizzard to measure wind turbine airflow
A first-of-its-kind study by researchers at the University of Minnesota (UMN) using snow during a Minnesota blizzard is giving researchers new insight into the airflow around large wind turbines.

3-D technology used to help California condors and other endangered species
A team including researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research has developed a novel methodology that, for the first time, combines 3-D and advanced range estimator technologies to provide highly detailed data on the range and movements of terrestrial, aquatic, and avian wildlife species.



Dogs exhibit jealous behavior
Dogs exhibit more jealous behaviors, like snapping or pushing their owner, when their owners displayed affectionate behaviors towards what appeared to be another dog compared to random objects.

Improving the cost and efficiency of renewable energy storage
A major challenge in renewable energy is storage. A common approach is a reaction that splits water into oxygen and hydrogen, and uses the hydrogen as a fuel to store energy.

Cancer: The roots of evil go deep in time
Every year around 450,000 people in Germany are diagnosed with cancer. Each one of them dreams of a victory in the battle against it.

Scientists developed new technology for the diagnosis of cancer cells
The type of therapy a cancer patient receives, largely depends on the trained eye of a pathologist. Investigating diseased organs and tissues under the microscope is one of their tasks.

Fish oil supplements reduce incidence of cognitive decline, may improve memory function
Rhode Island Hospital researchers have completed a study that found regular use of fish oil supplements (FOS) was associated with a significant reduction in cognitive decline and brain atrophy in older adults.

HIV study leads to insights into deadly infection
Research led by the University of Adelaide has provided new insights into how the HIV virus greatly boosts its chances of spreading infection, and why HIV is so hard to combat.

Rosetta Off to Decipher a Comet's Secrets
"Hello World." Upon hearing that brief message, scientists at the European Space Agency (ESA) and followers around the world sent up a collective cheer. Rosetta - the ESA spacecraft currently on a 10-year mission to orbit and land on a comet - awoke in January after a three-year hibernation, and was ready to get to work.

No extra mutations in modified stem cells, study finds
The ability to switch out one gene for another in a line of living stem cells has only crossed from science fiction to reality within this decade.

Study shows greater potential for solar power
Concentrating solar power (CSP) could supply a large fraction of the power supply in a decarbonized energy system, shows a new study of the technology and its potential practical application.

For gastric bypass patients, percent of weight loss differs by race/ethnicity, study finds
Non-Hispanic white patients who underwent a gastric bypass procedure lost slightly more weight over a three-year period than Hispanic or black patients, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published in the journal Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases.

A cure for HIV is a 'major scientific priority'
Huge advancements have taken place in HIV treatment and prevention over the past 10 years, but there is still no cure or vaccine.

Bowel cancer breakthrough may benefit thousands of patients
Researchers at Queen's University have made a significant breakthrough that may benefit patients with bowel cancer.

Criminal profiling technique targets killer diseases
A mathematical tool used by the Metropolitan Police and FBI has been adapted by researchers at Queen Mary University of London to help control outbreaks of malaria, and has the potential to target other infectious diseases.

Another concern arises over groundwater contamination from fracking accidents
The oil and gas extraction method known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, could potentially contribute more pollutants to groundwater than past research has suggested, according to a new study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Lipoic acid helps restore, synchronize the "biological clock"
Researchers have discovered a possible explanation for the surprisingly large range of biological effects that are linked to a micronutrient called lipoic acid: It appears to reset and synchronize circadian rhythms, or the "biological clock" found in most life forms.

In human evolution, changes in skin's barrier set Northern Europeans apart
The popular idea that Northern Europeans developed light skin to absorb more UV light so they could make more vitamin D - vital for healthy bones and immune function - is questioned by UC San Francisco researchers in a new study published online in the journal Evolutionary Biology.

Date Labeling Confusion Contributes to Food Waste New Scientific Review Paper Calls for Collaboration to Develop a Simple, Workable Solution
Date labeling variations on food products contribute to confusion and misunderstanding in the marketplace regarding how the dates on labels relate to food quality and safety, according to a scientific review paper in the July issue of Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety.

Researchers publish one of the longest longitudinal studies of cognition
Researchers at Kessler Foundation and the Cleveland Clinic have published one of the longest longitudinal studies of cognition in multiple sclerosis (MS).

First pediatric autism study conducted entirely online
UC San Francisco researchers have completed the first Internet-based clinical trial for children with autism, establishing it as a viable and cost effective method of conducting high-quality and rapid clinical trials in this population.

Hormone-disrupting activity of fracking chemicals worse than initially found
Many chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, can disrupt not only the human body's reproductive hormones but also the glucocorticoid and thyroid hormone receptors, which are necessary to maintain good health, a new study finds.

Bizarre parasite from the Jurassic
Around 165 million years ago, a spectacular parasite was at home in the freshwater lakes of present-day Inner Mongolia (China): A fly larva with a thorax formed entirely like a sucking plate.

Measuring the mass of 'massless' electrons
Individual electrons in graphene are massless, but when they move together, it's a different story.

New theory turns cancer on its head
A new theory of how cancer works could lead to the next generation of treatments of the disease.

Limb regeneration: Do salamanders hold the key?
The secret of how salamanders successfully regrow body parts is being unravelled by UCL researchers in a bid to apply it to humans.

In hairless man, arthritis drug spurs hair growth -- lots
A man with almost no hair on his body has grown a full head of it after a novel treatment by doctors at Yale University.

Taking a short smartphone break improves employee well-being, research finds
Want to be more productive and happier during the workday? Try taking a short break to text a friend, play "Angry Birds" or check Facebook on your smartphone, according to Kansas State University research.

A new stable and cost-cutting type of perovskite solar cell
Perovskite solar cells show tremendous promise in propelling solar power into the marketplace. The cells use a hole-transportation layer, which promotes the efficient movement of electrical current after exposure to sunlight.

Researcher discovers ovarian cancer treatment
Doctors at the University of Arizona Cancer Center at St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix reported today in Lancet Oncology that a new treatment for ovarian cancer can improve response rates (increase the rate of tumor shrinkage) and prolong the time until cancers recur.

Virus kills triple negative breast cancer cells, tumor cells in mice
A virus not known to cause disease kills triple-negative breast cancer cells and killed tumors grown from these cells in mice, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

Postcards from the Photosynthetic Edge
A crucial piece of the puzzle behind nature's ability to split the water molecule during photosynthesis that could help advance the development of artificial photosynthesis for clean, green and renewable energy has been provided by an international collaboration of scientists led by researchers with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

UF part of research team that finds equine influenza virus in camels
University of Florida researchers have found evidence that an influenza A virus can jump from horses to camels - and humans could be next.

Emerging HIV epidemics among people who inject drugs in the Middle East and North Africa
HIV epidemics are emerging among people who inject drugs in several countries in the Middle East and North Africa.

Studies provide important new information on genetic risk of sudden cardiac death
Two international research studies, both led by investigators affiliated with Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, have uncovered new information about genes that may increase the risk of serious cardiac arrhythmias.

Study identifies novel genomic changes in the most common type of lung cancer
Researchers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have identified novel mutations in a well-known cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of lung cancer.

Science magazine publishes study on new fossil human skulls from Spanish site
The study focuses on a collection of seventeen fossil human skulls excavated from an archaeological site known as the Sima de los Huesos (Pit of the Bones) in the Atapuerca hill in northern Spain and comes 21 years after the announcement of the first three skulls from the site was published in Nature in 1993.

Energy Drinks Raise New Questions About Caffeine's Safety
Caffeine, which was extensively researched for possible links to birth defects in animals and cardiovascular disease in humans over 30 years ago and then exonerated, has become the focus of renewed concerns as caffeine-containing energy drinks have surged in popularity.

Green planning needed to maintain city buildings
Green spaces in towns and cities need extra consideration as they may be damaging buildings in the area, according to new research from the Universities of Southampton and Surrey.

Cancer is avoidable as you grow older. Here's how.
Is cancer an inevitable consequence of aging?

Losing Sleep Over Your Divorce? Your Blood Pressure Could Suffer
Those who experience persistent sleep problems after a divorce stand to suffer from more than just dark circles. They might also be at risk for potentially harmful increases in blood pressure, a new study finds.

Stanford scientists tie social behavior to activity in specific brain circuit
A team of Stanford University investigators has linked a particular brain circuit to mammals' tendency to interact socially. Stimulating this circuit - one among millions in the brain - instantly increases a mouse's appetite for getting to know a strange mouse, while inhibiting it shuts down its drive to socialize with the stranger.

New research study shows huge savings for health care
Recently published findings in Annals of Internal Medicine by Steven Lipshultz, M.D., Wayne State University professor and chair of pediatrics and pediatrician-in-chief at the Children's Hospital of Michigan, part of the Detroit Medical Center, and colleagues could help to reduce health care charges while also protecting childhood cancer survivors from heart ailments caused by drug therapy.

Experts cite 'misconceptions' on brain metastases
"Key historical misconceptions" are hindering progress in research and treatment for patients with cancer metastases to the brain, suggests a special article in the July issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

How social media invades the workplace
Managers are more negative about the use of social media for private purposes in the workplace compared to subordinates. Still, top managers are the ones who use private social media most during working hours.

Scientists discover how plastic solar panels work
Scientists don't fully understand how 'plastic' solar panels work, which complicates the improvement of their cost efficiency, thereby blocking the wider use of the technology.

UV-induced beta-endorphin production causes addiction-like symptoms in mice
Why has it been so hard to discourage people from spending time in the sun when the dangers of ultraviolet light exposure are so well recognized?

Stem cell-based transplantation approach improves recovery from stroke
Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in developed countries, and there is an urgent need for more clinically effective treatments.

NASA's Hubble Finds Dwarf Galaxies Formed More Than Their Fair Share of Universe's Stars
They may be little, but they pack a big star-forming punch. New observations from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope show small galaxies, also known as dwarf galaxies, are responsible for forming a large proportion of the universe's stars.

Humans have been changing Chinese environment for 3,000 years
For thousands of years, Mother Nature has taken the blame for tremendous human suffering caused by massive flooding along the Yellow River, long known in China as the "River of Sorrow" and "Scourge of the Sons of Han."

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