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The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past month
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Wave energy integration costs should compare favorably to other energy sources
A new analysis suggests that large-scale wave energy systems developed in the Pacific Northwest should be comparatively steady, dependable and able to be integrated into the overall energy grid at lower costs than some other forms of alternative energy, including wind power.

Vegetation can help prevent soil erosion due to wind
Dust from soil erosion due to wind can affect human health, traffic, and, on a larger scale, climate.



Reducing emergency surgery cuts health care costs
As hospitals and health systems increasingly focus on addressing the rising cost of health care in the United States, and with the expense of surgical care playing a major role, physician researchers and others across the healthcare industry are working to identify innovative ways to reduce surgical costs.

Study finds that opioids administered in the ER don't influence patient satisfaction
A new study co-authored by investigators at the University of Massachusetts Medical School found that there is no correlation between opioids administered in the emergency room setting and Press Ganey ED patient satisfaction scores, one of the most commonly used metrics for measuring patient satisfaction.

One in every three people with type 1 diabetes produces insulin years post-diagnosis
About one-third of people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) produce insulin, as measured by C-peptide, a byproduct of insulin production, even upward of forty years from initial diagnosis, according to a first-of-its-kind, large-scale study conducted by researchers from T1D Exchange.

Lost memories might be able to be restored, new UCLA study indicates
New UCLA research indicates that lost memories can be restored. The findings offer some hope for patients in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

Study reveals major websites could be doing more to promote improved password security
Online giants including Amazon and LinkedIn could be doing far more to raise awareness of the need for better password practices among their users.

Scientists uncover new, fundamental mechanism for how resveratrol provides health benefits
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found that resveratrol, the red-wine ingredient once touted as an elixir of youth, powerfully activates an evolutionarily ancient stress response in human cells.

The psychology of gift-giving and receiving
Gift exchanges can reveal how people think about others, what they value and enjoy, and how they build and maintain relationships.

In head and neck cancer, surgeons need solid answers about tumor recurrence
Partnering with head and neck surgeons, pathologists at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center's Norris Cotton Cancer Center developed a new use for an old test to determine if a patient's cancer is recurring, or if the biopsy shows benign inflammation of mucosal tissues.

iPhone separation linked to physiological anxiety, poor cognitive performance
Cell phone use has become a common part of life as mobile devices have become one of the most popular ways to communicate.

Russian scientists 'map' water vapor in Martian atmosphere
Russian scientists from the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), together with their French and American colleagues, have created a 'map' of the distribution of water vapour in Mars' atmosphere.

Bone loss drugs may help prevent endometrial cancer
A new analysis suggests that women who use bisphosphonates--medications commonly used to treat osteoporosis and other bone conditions--have about half the risk of developing endometrial cancer as women who do not use the drugs.

A clear, molecular view of the evolution of human color vision
Many genetic mutations in visual pigments, spread over millions of years, were required for humans to evolve from a primitive mammal with a dim, shadowy view of the world into a greater ape able to see all the colors in a rainbow.

New study findings help physicians and patients determine prostate cancer risk
A discovery by researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute shows that looking at whether a man's uncles and great-grandparents, among other second- and third-degree relatives, had prostate cancer could be as important as looking at whether his father had prostate cancer.

Concerns raised about variable performance of some UK personal use breathalyzers
The ability of some breathalyzers widely sold to the UK public to detect potentially unsafe levels of breath alcohol for driving, varies considerably, reveals research published in the online journal BMJ Open.

Rice-sized laser, powered one electron at a time, bodes well for quantum computing
Princeton University researchers have built a rice grain-sized laser powered by single electrons tunneling through artificial atoms known as quantum dots.

World leaders gathering at Davos face calls for bold action to turn the tide on cancer
World leaders will face calls for bold action to respond to the rising human and economic toll of cancer when they meet in Davos at this year's World Economic Forum (WEF).

Electromagnetic waves linked to particle fallout in Earth's atmosphere, new study finds
In a new study that sheds light on space weather's impact on Earth, Dartmouth researchers and their colleagues show for the first time that plasma waves buffeting the planet's radiation belts are responsible for scattering charged particles into the atmosphere.

221 new species described by the California Academy of Sciences in 2014
In 2014, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added a whopping 221 new plant and animal species to our family tree, enriching our understanding of Earth's complex web of life and strengthening our ability to make informed conservation decisions.

Fast-food consumption linked to lower test score gains in 8th graders
The amount of fast food children eat may be linked to how well they do in school, a new nationwide study suggests.

Researchers discover new genetic anomalies in lung cancer
Developing effective treatments for lung cancer has been challenging, in part because so many genetic mutations play a role in the disease.

'Flying carpet' technique uses graphene to deliver one-two punch of anticancer drugs
An international team of researchers has developed a drug delivery technique that utilizes graphene strips as "flying carpets" to deliver two anticancer drugs sequentially to cancer cells, with each drug targeting the distinct part of the cell where it will be most effective.

Tailor-made cancer treatments? New cell culture technique paves the way
In a development that could lead to a deeper understanding of cancer and better early-stage treatment of the disease, University of Michigan researchers have devised a reliable way to grow a certain type of cancer cells from patients outside the body for study.

Malnutrition a Hidden Epidemic Among Elders, GSA Publication Finds
Health care systems and providers are not attuned to older adults' malnutrition risk, and ignoring malnutrition exacts a toll on hospitals, patients, and payers, according to the latest issue of the What's Hot newsletter from The Gerontological Society of America (GSA).

Microplastics in the ocean: Biologists study effects on marine animals
ngestion of microplastic particles does not mechanically affect marine isopods. This was the result of a study by biologists at the North Sea Office of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) that was published recently in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

New 'triggered-release' mechanism could improve drug delivery
More efficient medical treatments could be developed thanks to a new method for triggering the rearrangement of chemical particles.

Trade winds ventilate the tropical oceans
The changes can be measured, but their reasons were unknown. For several decades, scientists have carefully observed that the oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) in the tropical oceans are expanding.

Perovskites provide big boost to silicon solar cells, Stanford study finds
Stacking perovskites onto a conventional silicon solar cell dramatically improves the overall efficiency of the cell, according to a new study led by Stanford University scientists.

Using light to understand the brain
UCL researchers have developed an innovative way to understand how the brain works by using flashes of light, allowing them to both 'read' and 'write' brain signals.

Coral reveals long-term link between Pacific winds, global climate
New research indicates that shifts in Pacific trade winds played a key role in twentieth century climate variation, a sign that they may again be influencing global temperatures.

NOAA establishes 'tipping points' for sea level rise related flooding
By 2050, a majority of U.S. coastal areas are likely to be threatened by 30 or more days of flooding each year due to dramatically accelerating impacts from sea level rise, according to a new NOAA study, published today in the American Geophysical Union's online peer-reviewed journal Earth's Future.

Making a good thing better
The lithium-ion batteries that mobilize our electronic devices need to be improved if they are to power electric vehicles or store electrical energy for the grid. Berkeley Lab researchers looking for a better understanding of liquid electrolyte may have found a pathway forward.

IMF lending undermined healthcare provision in Ebola-stricken West Africa
Writing today in the journal Lancet Global Health, researchers from Cambridge University's Department of Sociology examine the links between the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

A vegetarian carnivorous plant
Carnivorous plants catch and digest tiny animals in order and derive benefits for their nutrition. Interestingly the trend towards vegetarianism seems to overcome carnivorous plants as well.

RDA/US and CENDI announce partnership to promote innovations in data sharing and exchange
Last week in Washington DC, the Research Data Alliance/United States (RDA/US) and CENDI Federal Information Managers Group announced an agreement to jointly sponsor events related to the advancement of data management innovation.

Alaska fish adjust to climate change by following the food
Not all species may suffer from climate change. A new analysis shows that Dolly Varden, a species of char common in southeast Alaska, adjust their migrations so they can keep feasting on a key food source - salmon eggs - even as shifts in climate altered the timing of salmon spawning.

Was Beethoven's music literally heartfelt?
Could it be that when Ludwig van Beethoven composed some of the greatest masterpieces of all time that he was quite literally following his heart?

Atom-thick CCD could capture images
An atomically thin material developed at Rice University may lead to the thinnest-ever imaging platform.

Yak dung burning pollutes indoor air of Tibetan households
Tibet, the highest region on Earth and one of the most remote, is associated with vivid blue skies and the crystal clear air of the Himalayas.

New challenges for ocean acidification research
Over the past decade, ocean acidification has received growing recognition not only in the scientific area. Decision-makers, stakeholders, and the general public are becoming increasingly aware of "the other carbon dioxide problem".

Century-old drug reverses autism-like symptoms in fragile X mouse model
Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) affect 1 to 2 percent of children in the United States. Hundreds of genetic and environmental factors have been shown to increase the risk of ASD.

Nearly half the systems crucial to stability of planet compromised
Almost half of the processes that are crucial to maintaining the stability of the planet have become dangerously compromised by human activity.

Suppressing a protein reduces cancer spread in mice
Scientists have found that decreasing the levels of or blocking a specific protein commonly found in humans and many other animals allowed them to slow the spread of two different kinds of cancer to the lungs of mice.

Variety is the spice of humble moth's sex life
A small brown moth has one of the most complex sex lives in the insect world, new research has found.

What causes brain problems after traumatic brain injury? Studies have a surprising answer
A new paper by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) argues that there is a widespread misunderstanding about the true nature of traumatic brain injury and how it causes chronic degenerative problems.

Research aims to improve rechargeable batteries by focusing on graphene oxide paper
A Kansas State University engineering team has discovered some of graphene oxide's important properties that can improve sodium- and lithium-ion flexible batteries.

How to sell the drugs of the future
Only a decade ago, basing medical treatment on your DNA seemed like science fiction. Not any more.

Peat fires -- a legacy of carbon up in smoke
It reads like a movie script - ash falling from the sky, thick smoke shutting down airports and businesses, road closures trapping remote northern villages.

New technique reveals immune cell motion
Neutrophils, a type of white blood cell, are the immune system's all-terrain vehicles. The cells are recruited to fight infections or injury in any tissue or organ in the body despite differences in the cellular and biochemical composition.

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