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The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past week.
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Medical expansion has led people worldwide to feel less healthy
Across much of the Western world, 25 years of expansion of the medical system has actually led to people feeling less healthy over time, a new study has found.

NC State researchers create 'nanofiber gusher'
Creating large amounts of polymer nanofibers dispersed in liquid is a challenge that has vexed researchers for years. But engineers and researchers at North Carolina State University and one of its start-up companies have now reported a method that can produce unprecedented amounts of polymer nanofibers, which have potential applications in filtration, batteries and cell scaffolding.



World Heritage Sites risk collapse without stronger local management
Without better local management, the world's most iconic ecosystems are at risk of collapse under climate change, say researchers in Science.

Microscope technique reveals for first time when and where proteins are made
Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and their international collaborators have developed a novel fluorescence microscopy technique that for the first time shows where and when proteins are produced.

New MIND diet may significantly protect against Alzheimer's disease
A new diet, appropriately known by the acronym MIND, could significantly lower a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, even if the diet is not meticulously followed, according to a paper published online for subscribers in March in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association.

Measuring student engagement could help teachers, administrators adapt strategies
Educators believe that student engagement in the classroom is crucial to learning and that it can increase achievement and enrollment in challenging courses while decreasing dropout rates.

Fewer multiple births could reduce autism risk in ART children
In a paper published online today (Thursday, March 19), scientists report that the incidence of diagnosed autism was twice as high for assisted reproductive technology (ART) as non-ART births among the nearly 6 million children in their study, born in California from 1997 through 2007.

Government action needed on iconic World Heritage ecosystems
Without better local management, the world's most iconic ecosystems are at risk of collapse under climate change, say researchers in a study published in the journal Science.

Rutgers University chemistry research holds great promise for advancing sustainable energy
New research published by Rutgers University chemists has documented significant progress confronting one of the main challenges inhibiting widespread utilization of sustainable power: Creating a cost-effective process to store energy so it can be used later.

Ocean pipes 'not cool,' would end up warming climate
To combat global climate change caused by greenhouse gases, alternative energy sources and other types of environmental recourse actions are needed. There are a variety of proposals that involve using vertical ocean pipes to move seawater to the surface from the depths in order to reap different potential climate benefits.

Some mushrooms glow, and here's why
Did you know that there are mushrooms that actually glow? Aristotle was aware of this intriguing fact more than 2,000 years ago.

Robotic materials: Changing with the world around them
Prosthetics with a realistic sense of touch. Bridges that detect and repair their own damage. Vehicles with camouflaging capabilities.

UCSF team finds key to making neurons from stem cells
A research team at UC San Francisco has discovered an RNA molecule called Pnky that can be manipulated to increase the production of neurons from neural stem cells.

Solar could meet California energy demand 3 to 5 times over
In the face of global climate change, increasing the use of renewable energy resources is one of the most urgent challenges facing the world.

Sharper nanoscopy
The 2014 chemistry Nobel Prize recognized important microscopy research that enabled greatly improved spatial resolution. This innovation, resulting in nanometer resolution, was made possible by making the source (the emitter) of the illumination quite small and by moving it quite close to the object being imaged.

Case Western Reserve scientists find hidden meaning and 'speed limits' within genetic code
Case Western Reserve scientists have discovered that speed matters when it comes to how messenger RNA (mRNA) deciphers critical information within the genetic code -- the complex chain of instructions critical to sustaining life.

Milky Way's center unveils supernova 'dust factory'
Sifting through the center of the Milky Way galaxy, astronomers have made the first direct observations - using an infrared telescope aboard a modified Boeing 747 - of cosmic building-block dust resulting from an ancient supernova.

Better season-long nutrient supply in soybean a 'low-hanging fruit' to improve upon
Over the last several decades there have been substantial yield improvements in soybean. Because of new varieties and new agronomic practices, the yield potential in soybean is higher now than ever before.

Sipuleucel-T in prostate cancer: Indication of added benefit
Sipuleucel-T (trade name Provenge) has been approved since September 2014 for men with metastatic prostate cancer who have few or no symptoms and do not yet require chemotherapy.

Black holes and the dark sector explained by quantum gravity
Ask any theoretical physicist on what are the most profound mysteries in physics and you will be surprised if she mentions anything other than Quantum Gravity and the Dark Sector.

Stem cells show promise for reversing type 2 diabetes
Scientists at the University of British Columbia and BetaLogics, part of Janssen Research & Development, LLC have shown for the first time that Type 2 diabetes can be effectively treated with a combination of specially-cultured stem cells and conventional diabetes drugs.

The taming of the shrew
CH5+, formed by adding a proton (H+) to the well-known methane (CH4) molecule, is the prototype of fluxional molecules. In contrast to common molecules, which are depicted as a rigid structure consisting of balls (atoms) and sticks (chemical bonds), the five hydrogen nuclei in CH5+ can move quite freely around the carbon nucleus.

New strategy to protect healthy gut microbes from antibiotics
Gut microbes promote human health by fighting off pathogens, but they also contribute to diseases such as diabetes and cancer.

Vitamin D prevents diabetes and clogged arteries in mice
In recent years, a deficiency of vitamin D has been linked to type 2 diabetes and heart disease, two illnesses that commonly occur together and are the most common cause of illness and death in Western countries.

Scientists move closer to '2 for 1 deal' on solar cell efficiency
The underlying mechanism behind an enigmatic process called "singlet exciton fission", which could enable the development of significantly more powerful solar cells, has been identified by scientists in a new study.

Summer storm weakening leads to more persistent heat extremes
This is shown in a study to be published in the renowned journal Science by a team of researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. They link the findings to changes in the Arctic caused by man-made global warming.

Unique proteins found in heat-loving organisms attach to plant matter
Unique proteins newly discovered in heat-loving bacteria are more than capable of attaching themselves to plant cellulose, possibly paving the way for more efficient methods of converting plant matter into biofuels.

Adapting to climate change will bring new environmental problems
Adapting to climate change could have profound environmental repercussions, according to a new study from the University of East Anglia.

Superfast computers a step closer as a silicon chip's quantum capabilities are improved
The team demonstrated a quantum on/off switching time of about a millionth of a millionth of a second - the fastest-ever quantum switch to be achieved with silicon and over a thousand times faster than previous attempts.

Men's preference for certain body types has evolutionary roots
A psychology study from The University of Texas at Austin sheds new light on today's standards of beauty, attributing modern men's preferences for women with a curvy backside to prehistoric influences.

'Attract and kill:' Trapping malaria mosquito mums before they lay eggs
In a world first, researchers have found that a naturally occurring chemical attracts pregnant malaria-transmitting mosquitoes - a discovery which could boost malaria control efforts.

First stem cell-based approach to treat type 2 diabetes effective in mice
A combination of human stem cell transplantation and antidiabetic drugs proved to be highly effective at improving body weight and glucose metabolism in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes.

Strengthening the immune system's fight against brain cancer
When cancer strikes, it may be possible for patients to fight back with their own defenses, using a strategy known as immunotherapy.

Streamlined 'military' work flow means more patient appointments and fewer return visits
Both patients and physicians may benefit from a "work flow" system developed at military medical facilities and tested at a Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center clinic, according to results of an efficiency study.

Kindergarten and crime: What's the link?
Children who are older when they start kindergarten do well in the short term, academically and socially. But as teenagers, these old-for-grade students are more likely to drop out and commit serious crimes, says new research from Duke University.

Increased susceptibility to measles a side effect of Ebola epidemic
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say that major disruptions in the health care systems in West Africa caused by the Ebola crisis have led to significant decreases in vaccinations for childhood diseases, increasing susceptibility to measles and other vaccine-preventable illnesses.

Massive amounts of fresh water, glacial melt pouring into Gulf of Alaska
Incessant mountain rain, snow and melting glaciers in a comparatively small region of land that hugs the southern Alaska coast and empties fresh water into the Gulf of Alaska would create the sixth largest coastal river in the world if it emerged as a single stream, a recent study shows.

New technologies for getting the most out of semen
For in vitro fertilization and other assisted reproductive technologies, selecting the healthiest and best swimming sperm from a sample of semen can dramatically increase success.

Cancer therapy 'tumor sanctuaries' and the breeding ground of resistance
Tumors acquiring resistance is one of the major barriers to successful cancer therapy.

Hospital ratings on social media appear to reflect quality of care
Social media has become an important way for institutions to communicate - both sending messages and receiving feedback - with clients and with the general public.

Impact of parents' military deployment on children's safety and mental health
A recent study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry reports that following military parents' return from combat deployment, their children show increased visits for mental healthcare, physical injury, and child maltreatment consults, compared to children whose parents have not been deployed.

New transitory form of silica observed
A Carnegie-led team was able to discover five new forms of silica under extreme pressures at room temperature. Their findings are published by Nature Communications.

What effect does music TV have on the sexual behavior of teenage boys and girls?
There is no doubt that teenage boys and girls are swayed and shaped by music TV. For example, sexually active youth of both genders, after watching music TV, think their peers are sexually active, too.

Scientists pinpoint molecule that switches on stem cell genes
Stem cells can have a strong sense of identity. Taken out of their home in the hair follicle, for example, and grown in culture, these cells remain true to themselves.

Suspension leads to more pot use among teens, study finds
Suspending kids from school for using marijuana is likely to lead to more -- not less -- pot use among their classmates, a new study finds.

Neuropsychology: Power naps produce a significant improvement in memory performance
Generations of school students have gone to bed the night before a maths exam or a vocabulary test with their algebra book or vocabulary notes tucked under their pillow in the hope that the knowledge would somehow be magically transferred into their brains while they slept.

Bright new hope for beating deadly hereditary stomach and breast cancers
Deadly familial stomach and lobular breast cancers could be successfully treated at their earliest stages, or even prevented, by existing drugs that have been newly identified by cancer genetics researchers at New Zealand's University of Otago.

Blood pressure drug protects against symptoms of multiple sclerosis in animal models
An FDA-approved drug for high blood pressure, guanabenz, prevents myelin loss and alleviates clinical symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) in animal models, according to a new study.

Chromosome shattering may be a hidden cause of birth defects
The human genome can be very forgiving. When children inherit chromosomes from their parents, some minor genetic changes frequently occur with few, if any, consequences.

Thinking of drinking and driving? What if your car won't let you?
If every new car made in the United States had a built-in blood alcohol level tester that prevented impaired drivers from driving the vehicle, how many lives could be saved, injuries prevented, and injury-related dollars left unspent?

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