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The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past week.
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Dogs exhibit jealous behavior
Dogs exhibit more jealous behaviors, like snapping or pushing their owner, when their owners displayed affectionate behaviors towards what appeared to be another dog compared to random objects.

Stanford study shows how to power California with wind, water and sun
Imagine a smog-free Los Angeles, where electric cars ply silent freeways, solar panels blanket rooftops and power plants run on heat from beneath the earth, from howling winds and from the blazing desert sun.



Immune response may cause harm in brain injuries, disorders
Could the body's own immune system play a role in memory impairment and cognitive dysfunction associated with conditions like chronic epilepsy, Alzheimer's dementia and concussions? Cleveland Clinic researchers believe so, based on a study published online by PLOS ONE.

New protein structure could help treat Alzheimer's, related diseases
There is no cure for Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, but the research community is one step closer to finding treatment.

A protein couple controls flow of information into the brain's memory center
Neuroscientists in Bonn and Heidelberg have succeeded in providing new insights into how the brain works. Researchers at the DZNE and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) analyzed tissue samples from mice to identify how two specific proteins, 'CKAMP44' and 'TARP Gamma-8', act upon the brain's memory center.

Wireless home automation systems reveal more than you would think about user behavior
Home automation systems that control domestic lighting, heating, window blinds or door locks offer opportunities for third parties to intrude on the privacy of the inhabitants and gain considerable insight into their behavioral patterns.

Smartphone experiment tracks whether our life story is written in our gut bacteria
Life events such as visiting another country or contracting a disease cause a significant shift in the make-up of the gut microbiota - the community of bacteria living in the digestive system, according to research published in the open access journal Genome Biology.

Stanford biologist warns of early stages of Earth's 6th mass extinction event
The planet's current biodiversity, the product of 3.5 billion years of evolutionary trial and error, is the highest in the history of life. But it may be reaching a tipping point.

New research suggests Saharan dust is key to the formation of Bahamas' Great Bank
A new study suggests that Saharan dust played a major role in the formation of the Bahamas islands. Researchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science showed that iron-rich Saharan dust provides the nutrients necessary for specialized bacteria to produce the island chain's carbonate-based foundation.

Climate change and the soil
The planet's soil releases about 60 billion tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year, which is far more than that released by burning fossil fuels.

New water balance calculation for the Dead Sea
The drinking water resources on the eastern, Jordanian side of the Dead Sea could decline severe as a result of climate change than those on the western, Israeli and Palestinian side.

Metastatic Brain Tumor Treatment Could Be on the Horizon With SapC-DOPS Use
Over half of patients being seen in the clinic for a diagnosed brain tumor have metastatic cancer, which has no treatment and detrimental outcomes in most cases.

No increased risk of cancer near Sellafield or Dounreay in recent years
Children, teenagers and young adults living near Sellafield or Dounreay since the 1990s are not at an increased risk of developing cancer according to research published in the British Journal of Cancer today.

Less than 1 percent of UK public research funding spent on antibiotic research in past 5 years
Less than 1% of research funding awarded by public and charitable bodies to UK researchers in 2008 was awarded for research on antibiotics, according to new research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Piggy-backing cells hold clue to skin cancer growth
Skin Cancer cells work together to spread further and faster, according to a new study published in Cell Reports. The discovery could lead to new drugs to tackle melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer.

Link between ritual circumcision procedure and herpes infection in infants examined
A rare procedure occasionally performed during Jewish circumcisions that involves direct oral suction is a likely source of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) transmissions documented in infants between 1988 and 2012, a literature review conducted by Penn Medicine researchers and published online in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Society found.

BU researchers discover that Klotho is neuroprotective against Alzheimer's disease
Boston University School of Medicine researchers may have found a way to delay or even prevent Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Increased risk for head, neck cancers in patients with diabetes
Diabetes mellitus (DM) appears to increase the risk for head and neck cancer (HNC).

Total darkness at night is key to success of breast cancer therapy -- Tulane study
Exposure to light at night, which shuts off nighttime production of the hormone melatonin, renders breast cancer completely resistant to tamoxifen, a widely used breast cancer drug, says a new study by Tulane University School of Medicine cancer researchers.

UPMC-Developed Test Increases Odds of Correct Surgery for Thyroid Cancer Patients
The routine use of a molecular testing panel developed at UPMC greatly increases the likelihood of performing the correct initial surgery for patients with thyroid nodules and cancer, report researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), partner with UPMC CancerCenter.

Informed consent: False positives not a worry in lung cancer study
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recently recommended computerized tomography (CT) lung screening for people at high risk for cancer, but a potential problem with CT is that many patients will have positive results on the screening test, only to be deemed cancer-free on further testing.

Researchers chart the ecological impacts of microbial respiration in the oxygen-starved ocean
A sulfur-oxidizing bacterial group called SUP05 will play an increasingly important role in carbon and nutrient cycling in the world's oceans as oxygen minimum zones expand, according to research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Farmers market vouchers may boost produce consumption in low-income families
Vouchers to buy fresh fruits and vegetables at farmers markets increase the amount of produce in the diets of some families on food assistance, according to research led by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.

NIH scientists find 6 new genetic risk factors for Parkinson's
Using data from over 18,000 patients, scientists have identified more than two dozen genetic risk factors involved in Parkinson's disease, including six that had not been previously reported. The study, published in Nature Genetics, was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and led by scientists working in NIH laboratories.

Brain's dynamic duel underlies win-win choices
People choosing between two or more equally positive outcomes experience paradoxical feelings of pleasure and anxiety, feelings associated with activity in different regions of the brain, according to research led by Amitai Shenhav, an associate research scholar at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute at Princeton University.

Henry Ford study: Burnout impacts transplant surgeons
Despite saving thousands of lives yearly, nearly half of organ transplant surgeons report a low sense of personal accomplishment and 40% feel emotionally exhausted, according to a new national study on transplant surgeon burnout.

A world first: Researchers identify a treatment that prevents tumor metastasis
Metastasis, the strategy adopted by tumor cells to transform into an aggressive form of cancer, are often associated with a gloomy prognosis.

Genomic analysis of prostate cancer indicates best course of action after surgery
There is controversy over how best to treat patients after they've undergone surgery for prostate cancer. Does one wait until the cancer comes back or provide men with additional radiation therapy to prevent cancer recurrence?

Early warning sign for babies at risk of autism
Some babies are at risk for autism because they have an older sibling that has the disorder.

Cultural Stereotypes May Evolve From Sharing Social Information
Millenials are narcissistic, scientists are geeky, and men like sports - or so cultural stereotypes would have us believe.

Incisionless Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Surgery Associated with Shorter Hospital Stays
New research from Penn Medicine shows that incisionless transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) surgery cuts length of hospital stay by 30 percent and has no impact on post-operative vascular complication rates when compared with conventional transfemoral TAVR, which requires an incision in the groin.

Study indicates large raptors in Africa used for bushmeat
Bushmeat, the use of native animal species for food or commercial food sale, has been heavily documented to be a significant factor in the decline of many species of primates and other mammals.

Worldwide water shortage by 2040
Two new reports that focus on the global electricity water nexus have just been published. Three years of research show that by the year 2040 there will not be enough water in the world to quench the thirst of the world population and keep the current energy and power solutions going if we continue doing what we are doing today.

'Experiential products' provide same happiness boost as experiences, study finds
Material items designed to create or enhance an experience, also known as "experiential products," can make shoppers just as happy as life experiences, according to new research from San Francisco State University.

Manipulating key protein in the brain holds potential against obesity and diabetes
A protein that controls when genes are switched on or off plays a key role in specific areas of the brain to regulate metabolism, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found.

What if hormones aren't fuel for the fire after all?
It's no wonder that breast cancer ranks highest among women's health concerns. Over 235,000 cases of breast cancer are diagnosed annually in the United States, with almost 40,000 deaths attributable to the disease.

New radiological signs of gastric lap band slippage identified
Researchers in Ohio and Rhode Island have identified two previously undescribed radiological signs of potentially life-threatening slippage of laparoscopically adjustable gastric bands.

Bats use the evening sky's polarization pattern for orientation
Animals can use varying sensory modalities for orientation, some of which might be very different from ours.

Obesity Linked to Low Endurance, Increased Fatigue in the Workplace
U.S. workplaces may need to consider innovative methods to prevent fatigue from developing in employees who are obese. Based on results from a new study published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene (JOEH), workers who are obese may have significantly shorter endurance times when performing workplace tasks, compared with their non-obese counterparts.

Penn Study Reveals New Evidence Showing Medical Student Perceptions of Health Policy Education are Improving, but 40 Percent are Still Not Satisfied
Students graduating from U.S. medical schools in 2012 feel they've received a better education in health policy issues than graduates surveyed in 2008, according to a multi-center study led by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and published online this month in Academic Medicine.

Monitoring the rise and fall of the microbiome
Trillions of bacteria live in each person's digestive tract. Scientists believe that some of these bacteria help digest food and stave off harmful infections, but their role in human health is not well understood.

TGen-led study seeks to understand why some HIV-positive men are more infectious than others
A new study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) provides insights into the interplay among bacteria, viruses and the immune system during HIV infection.

Scientists Test Nanoparticle
Researchers at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center are exploring ways to wake up the immune system so it recognizes and attacks invading cancer cells.

Researchers discover new way to determine cancer risk of chemicals
A new study has shown that it is possible to predict long-term cancer risk from a chemical exposure by measuring the short-term effects of that same exposure.

Earlier Stone Age artifacts found in Northern Cape of South Africa
Excavations at an archaeological site at Kathu in the Northern Cape province of South Africa have produced tens of thousands of Earlier Stone Age artifacts, including hand axes and other tools.

Mortality rates increase due to extreme heat and cold
When temperatures are extremely high or low, there is a significant increase in the number of deaths caused by heart failure or stroke.

Shift work linked to heightened risk of type 2 diabetes
Shift work is linked to a heightened risk of developing type 2 diabetes, with the risk seemingly greatest among men and those working rotating shift patterns, indicates an analysis of the available evidence published online in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

Leaf-mining insects destroyed with the dinosaurs, others quickly appeared
After the asteroid impact at the end of the Cretaceous period that triggered the dinosaurs' extinction and ushered in the Paleocene, leaf-mining insects in the western United States completely disappeared.

New imaging agent provides better picture of the gut
A multi-institutional team of researchers has developed a new nanoscale agent for imaging the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.

Rutgers Study Explores Attitudes and Preferences Toward Post-Sandy Rebuilding
A yearlong study funded by the New Jersey Recovery Fund and conducted by researchers at the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University has found that individual property owners in Sandy-affected towns are skeptical about the likelihood of community-based rebuilding solutions.

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