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The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past week.
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If you're sitting down, don't sit still, new research suggests
New research suggests that the movements involved in fidgeting may counteract the adverse health impacts of sitting for long periods.

Inflammatory response may fan the flame of dietary fats' role in obesity-related diseases
An enhanced inflammatory response could be the key link between high saturated fat intake - a recognized risk factor for obesity-related disorders - and the development of diseases like type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis.

Flower declines shrink bee tongues
Climate-related changes in flower diversity have resulted in a decrease in the length of alpine bumble bees' tongues, a new study reports, leaving these insects poorly suited to feed from and pollinate the deep flowers they were adapted to previously.

Arteries better than veins for liquid biopsy
As the field of liquid biopsies for tracking disease progression and therapeutic response heats up, many doctors are looking for ways to apply this approach to their patients.

New polymer creates safer fuels
Before embarking on a transcontinental journey, jet airplanes fill up with tens of thousands of gallons of fuel. In the event of a crash, such large quantities of fuel increase the severity of an explosion upon impact.

Study shows new forests cannot take in as much carbon as predicted
As carbon emissions continue to rise, scientists project forests will grow faster and larger, due to an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide, which fuels photosynthesis.

Chip-based technology enables reliable direct detection of Ebola virus
A team led by researchers at UC Santa Cruz has developed chip-based technology for reliable detection of Ebola virus and other viral pathogens.

Kids with asthma that are exposed to secondhand smoke have twice as many hospitalizations
The risk for hospitalization doubles for kids with asthma who are exposed to secondhand smoke, according to a study led by Mayo Clinic Children's Research Center.

Public Release: 24-Sep-2015 Female genital cutting is based on private values rather than social norms
Worldwide an estimated 125 million girls and women are cut despite the fact that female genital cutting leads to serious health problems throughout life.

MD Anderson study identifies leukemia tumor suppressor
A protein-coding gene called hnRNP K has been identified as a tumor suppressor for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a finding that could be important for investigating how best to target treatment of a blood cancer striking mostly older individuals.

Researchers examine tradeoffs, potential of using liquid natural gas as marine fuel
As the maritime shipping industry transitions toward cleaner fuels in response to new environmental regulations and emissions standards, abundant supplies of natural gas in the United States, and worldwide, appear to offer a promising solution in transportation industries.

How celebrity suicides change support-seeking practices on social media
There's a widely adopted suicide support forum on Reddit called "SuicideWatch." It features entries from people looking for support and guidance from experienced, trained moderators and anonymous social media users volunteering to extend help to those in need.

Weight loss, exercise improve fertility in women with PCOS
Weight loss and exercise improve ovulation in women who have polycystic ovary syndrome, a common hormone disorder that often causes infertility, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Los Alamos explores hybrid ultrasmall gold nanocluster for enzymatic fuel cells
With fossil-fuel sources dwindling, better biofuel cell design is a strong candidate in the energy field.

Bumblebees' adaptation to climate change could lead to rise in declining bee population
Rising temperatures in alpine habitats worldwide have resulted in declines in flowering among indigenous plants and contributed to dramatic declines in populations of several bumblebee species prevalent in those regions.

Breaking the anxiety cycle
A woman who won't drive long distances because she has panic attacks in the car. A man who has contamination fears so intense he cannot bring himself to use public bathrooms.

How fossil corals can shed light on the Earth's past climate
In a paper published today in Science, researchers from the University of Bristol describe how they used radiocarbon measured in deep-sea fossil corals to shed light on carbon dioxide (CO2) levels during the Earth's last deglaciation.

11-year cosmic search leads to black hole rethink
One hundred years since Einstein proposed gravitational waves as part of his general theory of relativity, an 11-year search performed with CSIRO's Parkes telescope has failed to detect them, casting doubt on our understanding of galaxies and black holes.

Vaccination on the horizon for severe viral infection of the brain
Researchers from the University of Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich reveal possible new treatment methods for a rare, usually fatal brain disease.

Connecting the dots: Integrated biodiversity data could be the key to a sustainable future
Biodiversity Observation Networks (BONs) have recently become a hot topic on the scene of natural sciences. But what is their role in advancing our knowledge of biodiversity and associated ecosystem services?

Past spikes in carbon dioxide levels accompanied by high ocean circulation
Two abrupt rises in carbon dioxide and Northern Hemispheric warming occurred during the last glacial ice melt, and new evidence confirms that these spikes were accompanied by deep ocean "flushing" events.

Discovery of genetic differences between relapsing/non-relapsing breast cancers
Vienna, Austria: Although most patients with breast cancer are cured after treatment, in about one in five the cancer will recur, returning either to the same place as the original tumour or spreading to other parts of the body (metastasis).

Guideline released on minimally invasive procedure, EBUS-TBNA, to diagnose lung diseases
The American College of Chest Physicians announced the release of new clinical guidelines on endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA).

New theory of stealth dark matter may explain universe's missing mass
Lawrence Livermore scientists have come up with a new theory that may identify why dark matter has evaded direct detection in Earth-based experiments.

PolyU develops novel eco high performance energy storage device
The Department of Applied Physics of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has developed a simple approach to synthesize novel environmentally friendly manganese dioxide ink by using glucose.

Antidepressants plus blood-thinners slow down brain cancer
Gliomas are aggressive brain tumors arising from the brain's supporting glial cells. They account for about a third of all brain tumors, and hold the highest incidence and mortality rate among primary brain cancer patients, creating an urgent need for effective treatments.

Tiny mitochondria play outsized role in human evolution and disease
Mitochondria are not only the power plants of our cells, these tiny structures also play a central role in our physiology.

Promising drugs turn immune system on cancer
Cancer Research UK scientists have shown that a class of experimental drug treatments already in clinical trials could also help the body's immune system to fight cancer, according to a study published today (Thursday) in the journal Cell.

UAF model used to estimate Antarctic ice sheet melting
To see how burning up the Earth's available fossil fuels might affect the Antarctic ice sheet, scientists turned to a computer program developed at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute.

NIH researchers find role for soft palate in adaptation of transmissible influenza viruses
National Institutes of Health scientists and their colleagues identified a previously unappreciated role for the soft palate during research to better understand how influenza (flu) viruses acquire the ability to move efficiently between people.

Nano-mechanical study offers new assessment of silicon for next-gen batteries
A detailed nano-mechanical study of mechanical degradation processes in silicon structures containing varying levels of lithium ions offers good news for researchers attempting to develop reliable next-generation rechargeable batteries using silicon-based electrodes.

Rapidly assessing the next influenza pandemic
Influenza pandemics are potentially the most serious natural catastrophes that affect the human population.

DNA-based nanodevices for molecular medicine
Self-assembled DNA nanostructures can be used in molecular-scale diagnostics and as smart drug-delivery vehicles.

Purdue study: Climate change consensus extends beyond climate scientists
A Purdue University-led survey of nearly 700 scientists from non-climate disciplines shows that more than 90 percent believe that average global temperatures are higher than pre-1800s levels and that human activity has significantly contributed to the rise.

Do patients with age-related macular degeneration have trouble with touch screens?
Older adults with central vision loss caused by age-related macular degeneration (AMD) have no problem with accuracy in performing touch screen tasks, according to a study in the October issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry.

Newly identified mechanism solves enduring mystery of key element of cellular organization
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have discovered evidence of a mechanism at the heart of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and related degenerative diseases.

Southampton scientists reveal first results using new National Dark Fibre Infrastructure
Southampton scientists will reveal the first research results from the new National Dark Fibre Infrastructure Service (NDFIS) at an international conference this week.

A twist for control of orbital angular momentum of neutron waves
An experiment by a team of researchers led from the University of Waterloo's Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) shows, for the first time, that a wave property of neutrons, Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM), can be controlled.

Sticky gel helps stem cells heal rat hearts
A sticky, protein-rich gel created by Johns Hopkins researchers appears to help stem cells stay on or in rat hearts and restore their metabolism after transplantation, improving cardiac function after simulated heart attacks, according to results of a new study.

Revisiting the Veil Nebula
Deriving its name from its delicate, draped filamentary structures, the beautiful Veil Nebula is one of the best-known supernova remnants.

A mutated gene found in families with multiple tumors, including cardiac angiosarcoma
A few years ago, Javier Benítez, director of the Human Genetics Group at the CNIO, received a call from Pablo García Pavía, from the Cardiology Unit of the Puerta de Hierro University Hospital.

Future of HIV cure research points to combination approach
The next five years of HIV research should shift gears from the classic single-therapy development model to moving directly from in vitro studies to combination therapy trials, authors argue in a new paper published online today.

Newly identified biochemical pathway could be target for insulin control
In the final event leading to the development of Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas loses its ability to secrete insulin and clear glucose from the blood. Preventing this breakdown in insulin secretion is a key goal in the fight to reduce the burden of a disease that afflicts an estimated 29 million people in the United States.

Designed defects in liquid crystals can guide construction of nanomaterials
Imperfections running through liquid crystals can be used as miniscule tubing, channeling molecules into specific positions to form new materials and nanoscale structures, according to engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The discovery could have applications in fields as diverse as electronics and medicine.

Proposed standards for triboelectric nanogenerators could facilitate comparisons
More than 60 research groups worldwide are now developing variations of the triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG), which converts ambient mechanical energy into electricity for powering wearable electronics, sensor networks, implantable medical devices and other small systems.

Intratumor morphological heterogeneity of cancer is not related to chromosome aberrations
Intratumor morphological heterogeneity (diversity) of breast cancer is not related to chromosome aberrations. This conclusion was made based on the study of one case with aggressive variant of breast cancer - invasive micropapillary carcinoma by researchers from Tomsk State University (TSU), Tomsk Cancer Research Institute (TCRI), and Institute of Medical Genetics.

New methodology tracks changes in DNA methylation in real time at single-cell resolution
Whitehead Institute researchers have developed a methodology to monitor changes in DNA methylation over time in individual cells.

Early exposure to tobacco as a cause of behavioral problems in children
Researchers from Inserm and Pierre and Marie Curie University (UPMC), in collaboration with the university hospitals of 6 French cities, have analysed data on pre- and postnatal exposure to tobacco in the homes of 5,200 primary school children.

Protein conjugation method offers new possibilities for biomaterials
Biological systems are at the source of many products designed to improve our lives. Recombinant DNA, for example, which retools molecules from multiple genetic sources for new purposes, has spurred the rise of life-changing therapeutics like unique blood-clotting proteins and synthetic insulin.

Method could make hydrogen fuel cells more efficient
With the growth of wind and solar energy and the increasing popularity of electric vehicles, many people in the U.S. may have forgotten about the promised "hydrogen economy."

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