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The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past week.
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Study recommends ongoing assessment of impact of offshore wind farms on marine species
Offshore wind power is a valuable source of renewable energy that can help reduce carbon emissions.

Yale Journal: How, When, and Why Industrial Ecology is Good for Business
Industrial ecology, a rapidly growing field focused on sustainable production and consumption, has contributed numerous important tools to modern environmental management - life cycle assessment; "industrial symbiosis," or the by-product exchange between neighboring facilities; "design for environment"; and the use of material flow analysis to track resource use in supply chains, companies, and economies.



Adenosine can melt 'love handles'
The number of overweight persons is greatly increasing worldwide - and as a result is the risk of suffering a heart attack, stroke, diabetes or Alzheimer's disease.

Miriam Hospital study finds smoking during pregnancy alters newborn stress hormones and DNA
Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have studied the effects of smoking during pregnancy and its impact on the stress response in newborn babies.

Formation and large scale confinement of jets emitted by young stars elucidated
An international team of scientists has succeeded in explaining the formation and propagation over astronomical distances of jetsof matter emitted by young stars-one of the most fascinating mysteries of modern astronomy.

That pregnant feeling makes a fly start nesting
Across the animal kingdom, it's not uncommon for pregnancy to change an expectant mom's behavior.

Divide and conquer: Novel trick helps rare pathogen infect healthy people
New research into a rare pathogen has shown how a unique evolutionary trait allows it to infect even the healthiest of hosts through a smart solution to the body's immune response against it.

Findings point to an 'off switch' for drug resistance in cancer
Like a colony of bacteria or species of animals, cancer cells within a tumor must evolve to survive.

Immune cells in the liver drive fatty liver disease and liver cancer
Immune cells that migrate to the liver and interact there with liver tissue cells get activated by metabolic stress (e.g. through lipids of a high fat diet) and drive the development of fatty liver disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and liver cancer.

New pill-only regimens cure patients with hardest-to-treat hepatitis C infection
Two new pill-only regimens that rapidly cure most patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C (HCV) infection could soon be widely prescribed across Europe.

Leading lung health organizations release first-ever evidence-based patient care guidelines in prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD
The American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) and the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) announced today the release of Prevention of Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: American College of Chest Physicians and Canadian Thoracic Society Guideline in the journal CHEST.

New Univeristy of Virginia study upends current theories of how mitochondria began
Parasitic bacteria were the first cousins of the mitochondria that power cells in animals and plants - and first acted as energy parasites in those cells before becoming beneficial, according to a new University of Virginia study that used next-generation DNA sequencing technologies to decode the genomes of 18 bacteria that are close relatives of mitochondria.

A global natural gas boom alone won't slow climate change
A new analysis of global energy use, economics and the climate shows that without new climate policies, expanding the current bounty of inexpensive natural gas alone would not slow the growth of global greenhouse gas emissions worldwide over the long term, according to a study appearing today in Nature.

Presence of enzyme may worsen effects of spinal cord injury and impair long-term recovery
Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition with few treatment options. Studies show that damage to the barrier separating blood from the spinal cord can contribute to the neurologic deficits that arise secondary to the initial trauma.

Earth's magnetic field could flip within a human lifetime
Imagine the world waking up one morning to discover that all compasses pointed south instead of north.

New perspectives for development of an RSV vaccine
Respiratory Syncytial Virus causes severe respiratory tract infections and worldwide claims the lives of 160,000 children each year.

Brain's Compass Relies on Geometric Relationships, Say Penn Researchers
The brain has a complex system for keeping track of which direction you are facing as you move about; remembering how to get from one place to another would otherwise be impossible. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have now shown how the brain anchors this mental compass.

Tiny 'nanoflares' might heat the Sun's corona
Why is the Sun's million-degree corona, or outermost atmosphere, so much hotter than the Sun's surface? This question has baffled astronomers for decades.

Academies call for consequences from the Ebola virus epidemic
The Ebola virus is spreading rapidly and to an unexpected extent. The outbreak does not follow the patterns experienced in the past and the virus shows a new disease dynamic in regions, where it has never been recorded before.

NASA's Hubble Finds Extremely Distant Galaxy through Cosmic Magnifying Glass
Peering through a giant cosmic magnifying glass, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has spotted a tiny, faint galaxy -- one of the farthest galaxies ever seen. The diminutive object is estimated to be more than 13 billion light-years away.

Staph 'gangs' share nutrients during infection: study
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria can share resources to cause chronic infections, Vanderbilt investigators have discovered. Like the individual members of a gang who might be relatively harmless alone, they turn deadly when they get together with their "friends."

Probing the past
Using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope astronomers have made what may be the most reliable distance measurement yet of an object that existed in the Universe's formative years.

Energy Prices and Business Decision-Making in Canada: Preparing for the Energy Future
Canada has abundant energy sources, from vast oil sands to ample hydroelectric capacity, offshore oil, natural gas, and coal.

Getting the salt out
The boom in oil and gas produced through hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is seen as a boon for meeting U.S. energy needs.

University of Calgary research leads to brain cancer clinical trial
Researchers at the University of Calgary's Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI) and Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute (SACRI) have made a discovery that could prolong the life of people living with glioblastoma - the most aggressive type of brain cancer.

New study shows the importance of jellyfish falls to deep-sea ecosystem
This week, researchers from University of Hawai'i, Norway, and the UK have shown with innovative experiments that a rise in jellyfish blooms near the ocean's surface may lead to jellyfish falls that are rapidly consumed by voracious deep-sea scavengers.

Study shows inpatient palliative care reduces hospital costs and readmissions
Palliative care provided in the hospital offers known clinical benefits, and a new study shows that inpatient palliative care can also significantly lower the cost of hospitalization and the rate of readmissions.

Mild traumatic brain injury can have lasting effects for families, reports the American Journal of Nursing
Families of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) may expect them to return to normal quickly-after all, it's "just a concussion."

MAVEN spacecraft's first look at Mars holds surprises, says CU-Boulder mission leader
NASA's MAVEN spacecraft has provided scientists their first look at a storm of energetic solar particles at Mars and produced unprecedented ultraviolet images of the tenuous oxygen, hydrogen and carbon coronas surrounding the Red Planet, said University of Colorado Boulder Professor Bruce Jakosky, the mission's principal investigator.

NASA Spacecraft Provides New Information About Sun's Atmosphere
NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) has provided scientists with five new findings into how the sun's atmosphere, or corona, is heated far hotter than its surface, what causes the sun's constant outflow of particles called the solar wind, and what mechanisms accelerate particles that power solar flares.

Texans share lessons learned as second enrollment period of ACA health insurance nears
While most Texans used healthcare.gov earlier this year to get information or to enroll in a health insurance plan under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), larger percentages of Texans found talking to the call center or a navigator was the most helpful.

Women with high blood pressure get different treatment to men
Women who are treated for high blood pressure are not given the same medication as men, nor do they hit the treatment targets as often, reveals a thesis from the Sahlgrenska Academy.

High-fat meals could be more harmful to males than females, according to new obesity research
Male and female brains are not equal when it comes to the biological response to a high-fat diet. Cedars-Sinai Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute scientist Deborah Clegg, PhD, and a team of international investigators found that the brains of male laboratory mice exposed to the same high-fat diet as their female counterparts developed brain inflammation and heart disease that were not seen in the females.

Unique catalysts for hydrogen fuel cells synthesized in ordinary kitchen microwave oven
Swedish and Chinese researchers show how a unique nano-alloy composed of palladium nano-islands embedded in tungsten nanoparticles creates a new type of catalysts for highly efficient oxygen reduction, the most important reaction in hydrogen fuel cells.

Sugared soda consumption, cell aging associated in new study
Sugar-sweetened soda consumption might promote disease independently from its role in obesity, according to UC San Francisco researchers who found in a new study that drinking sugary drinks was associated with cell aging.

Sheltering habits help sharks cope with acid oceans
A shark's habitat can reduce its sensitivity to rising CO2 levels, according to Australian scientists.

Myth-conceptions: How myths about the brain are hampering teaching
Teachers in the UK, Holland, Turkey, Greece and China were presented with seven so-called 'neuromyths' and asked whether they believe them to be true.

S-equol supplements associated with improved measures of reproductive health in postmenopausal women
Post-menopausal women experienced improvements in vaginal atrophy, with no significant effect on hormone levels or genital bleeding, after 12 weeks of daily 10 milligram (mg) doses of an investigational fermented soy germ-based nutritional supplement previously shown to help relieve certain menopause symptoms.

Researchers develop personalized ovarian cancer vaccines
Researchers at the University of Connecticut have found a new way to identify protein mutations in cancer cells. The novel method is being used to develop personalized vaccines to treat patients with ovarian cancer.

Tuning light to kill deep cancer tumors
An international group of scientists led by Gang Han, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, has combined a new type of nanoparticle with an FDA-approved photodynamic therapy to effectively kill deep-set cancer cells in vivo with minimal damage to surrounding tissue and fewer side effects than chemotherapy.

Myelin vital for learning new practical skills
New evidence of myelin's essential role in learning and retaining new practical skills, such as playing a musical instrument, has been uncovered by UCL research. Myelin is a fatty substance that insulates the brain's wiring and is a major constituent of 'white matter'.

Loss of big predators could leave herbivores in a thorny situation
Global declines in carnivore populations could embolden plant eaters to increasingly dine on succulent vegetation, driving losses in plant and tree biodiversity, according to UBC research published today in Science.

Novel RNAi-based therapy for anemia stimulates liver to produce EPO
To treat the debilitating anemia associated with reduced erythropoietin (EPO) production by the kidneys in chronic renal disease, patients are often given recombinant human EPO to increase hemoglobin levels.

Curious signal hints at dark matter
Space scientists at the University of Leicester have detected a curious signal in the X-ray sky - one that provides a tantalising insight into the nature of mysterious Dark Matter.

Microfossils reveal warm oceans had less oxygen, Syracuse geologists say
Researchers in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences are pairing chemical analyses with micropaleontology-the study of tiny fossilized organisms-to better understand how global marine life was affected by a rapid warming event more than 55 million years ago.

Natural gas boom will not slow climate change
This market effect erases the advantage of lower emissions from the natural gas itself, according to an unprecedented international comparison of computer simulations.

Executive scandal hurts job prospects even for entry-level employees
There's more bad news for job seekers with a scandal-hit company like Lehman Brothers or Countrywide Mortgage on their résumés.

Researchers develop world's thinnest electric generator
Researchers from Columbia Engineering and the Georgia Institute of Technology report today that they have made the first experimental observation of piezoelectricity and the piezotronic effect in an atomically thin material, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), resulting in a unique electric generator and mechanosensation devices that are optically transparent, extremely light, and very bendable and stretchable.

Gradual weight loss no better than rapid weight loss for long-term weight control
Contrary to current dietary recommendations, slow and steady weight loss does not reduce the amount or rate of weight regain compared with losing weight quickly, new research published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology has found.

First Detailed Map of Aboveground Forest Carbon Stocks in Mexico Unveiled
The Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC) and Allianza MREDD+ released the first detailed map of aboveground forest carbon stocks of Mexico available for download today.

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