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The top science news articles and science news articles and current events, scientific discoveries, studies and research from the past week.
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Small molecule helps get stem cells to sites of disease and damage
Bioengineers from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) with collaborators at the pharmaceutical company Sanofi have identified small molecules that can be used to program stem cells to home in on sites of damage, disease and inflammation.

Researchers demonstrate optogenetic stimulation of the brain to control pain
A new study by a University of Texas at Arlington physics team in collaboration with bioengineering and psychology researchers shows for the first time how a small area of the brain can be optically stimulated to control pain.



Found: Ancient, super-bright quasar with massive black hole
Quasars--supermassive black holes found at the center of distant massive galaxies--are the most-luminous beacons in the sky.

Radio chip for the 'Internet of things'
At this year's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, the big theme was the "Internet of things" -- the idea that everything in the human environment, from kitchen appliances to industrial equipment, could be equipped with sensors and processors that can exchange data, helping with maintenance and the coordination of tasks.

New findings show stark inequalities in aging as government encourages us to work longer
Changes in pension and employment policies are making it increasingly necessary for older people in the UK to work beyond the age of 65.

NASA snaps picture of Eastern US in a record-breaking 'freezer'
NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the snow-covered eastern U.S. that looks like the states have been sitting in a freezer. In addition to the snow cover, Arctic and Siberian air masses have settled in over the Eastern U.S. triggering many record low temperatures in many states.

Skin test may shed new light on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases
Scientists have discovered a skin test that may shed new light on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, according to a study released today will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., April 18 to 25, 2015.

New HPV approved after international phase 2/3 trial involving Moffitt Cancer Center
Approximately 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year in the United States and another 4,000 die annually from the disease.

Living in the genetic comfort zone
The information encoded in the DNA of an organism is not sufficient to determine the expression pattern of genes.

First direct observation of carbon dioxide's increasing greenhouse effect at the Earth's surface
Scientists have observed an increase in carbon dioxide's greenhouse effect at the Earth's surface for the first time.

Astronomers find impossibly large black hole
An international team of astronomers have found a huge and ancient black hole which was powering the brightest object early in the universe.

Survey shows postmenopausal women with VVA report improved satisfaction with VagiCap
Newly released patient satisfaction survey results from a study of a novel investigational vaginal estrogen treatment show promise for improving quality of life and satisfaction for postmenopausal women who experience pain during sex and other symptoms associated with vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA).

EARTH Magazine: Hazard lingers after South Napa earthquake
Napa Valley earthquake, movement continued along the principal fault to the north of the epicenter, according to a report released by the U.S. Geological Survey.

The first ever photograph of light as a particle and a wave
Quantum mechanics tells us that light can behave simultaneously as a particle or a wave. However, there has never been an experiment able to capture both natures of light at the same time; the closest we have come is seeing either wave or particle, but always at different times.

Crocs rocked pre-Amazonian Peru
Thirteen million years ago, as many as seven different species of crocodiles hunted in the swampy waters of what is now northeastern Peru, new research shows.

A new look at culture and its influence on individuals and organizations
Whether you are an executive, an entrepreneur, or even an MBA student, the ability to bridge cultural gaps and leverage foreign ideas and opportunities is critical to success in today's increasingly global business environment.

Powerful dengue neutralizing antibody found
A new Duke-NUS-led study has identified a super-potent antibody which requires a minute amount to neutralize the dengue virus.

Discovery about beliefs could prove useful in addiction treatment, researchers say
Two identical cigarettes led to a discovery by scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute. Study participants inhaled nicotine, yet they showed significantly different brain activity.

Yale researchers reverse type 2 diabetes and fatty liver disease in rats
Yale researchers developed a controlled-release oral therapy that reversed type 2 diabetes and fatty liver disease in rats, according to a study published on Feb. 26 by Science.

Ultrasound lags behind MRI for supplemental breast cancer screening
Cancer screening of women with dense breast tissue is a subject of great interest to both the medical community and the press.

Traditional forms of media coverage valued over advertising, UGA study finds
In an age where digital media is constantly changing, public relations practitioners and business professionals still see the benefits of traditional media coverage, according to a recent study in Public Relations Journal conducted by researchers at the University of Georgia.

Newly discovered algal species helps corals survive in the hottest reefs on the planet
A new species of algae has been discovered in reef corals of the Persian (Arabian) Gulf where it helps corals to survive seawater temperatures of up to 36 degrees Celsius - temperatures that would kill corals elsewhere.

HIV latency is not an accident: It is a survival tactic employed by the virus
New research from the Gladstone Institutes for the first time provides strong evidence that HIV latency is controlled not by infected host cells, but by the virus itself.

Scientists find a key protein that allows Plavix to conquer platelets
Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have found that the blood platelet protein Rasa3 is critical to the success of the common anti-platelet drug Plavix, which breaks up blood clots during heart attacks and other arterial diseases.

Detecting defects at the nanoscale will profit solar panel production
RESEARCH at the University of Huddersfield will lead to major efficiency gains and cost savings in the manufacture of flexible solar panels.

Research shows Asian herb holds promise as treatment for Ebola virus disease
New research that focuses on the mechanism by which Ebola virus infects a cell and the discovery of a promising drug therapy candidate is being published February 27, 2015, in the journal Science.

Safety and life-saving efficacy of statins have been exaggerated, says USF scientist
Hailed as miracle drugs when they hit the market two decades ago, statins, the cholesterol-lowering drugs prescribed to prevent heart attacks, are not as effective nor as safe as we have been led to believe.

High-energy breakfast with low-energy dinner helps control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes
A small new study published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) shows that, in people with type 2 diabetes, those who consume a high energy breakfast and a low energy dinner have better blood sugar control than those who eat a low energy breakfast and a high energy dinner.

Fighting the Colorado potato beetle with RNA interference
Colorado potato beetles are a dreaded pest of potatoes all over the world. Since they do not have natural enemies in most potato producing regions, farmers try to control them with pesticides.

NYU study successfully screens for diabetes at dental visits using oral blood
It is estimated that 8.1 million of the 29.1 million Americans living with diabetes are undiagnosed and many who have diabetes have poor glycemic control.

Climate science literacy unrelated to public acceptance of human-caused global warming
Deep public divisions over climate change are unrelated to differences in how well ordinary citizens understand scientific evidence on global warming.

Researchers discover 'milk' protein that enables survival of the species
Australian researchers have discovered the protein MCL-1 is critical for keeping milk-producing cells alive and sustaining milk production in the breast.

Finding psychological insights through social media
Social media has opened up a new digital world for psychology research. Four researchers will be discussing new methods of language analysis, and how social media can be leveraged to study personality, mental and physical health, and cross-cultural differences.

Study sheds light on a 'guardian' protein of brain function
Mitochondria not only are the cell's main power producers, they are also the chief cooks and bottle washers.

Lithium from the coal in China
Coal from China could become a major source of the metal lithium, according to a review of the geochemistry by scientists published in the International Journal of Oil, Gas and Coal Technology.

Growth signal can influence cancer cells' vulnerability to drugs, study suggests
In theory, a tumor is an army of clones, made up of many copies of the original cancerous cell. But tumor cells don't always act like duplicates, and their unpredictable behavior can create problems for treatment.

Community-led marine reserve produces benefits for fisheries and conservation
The first and only fully protected marine reserve in Scotland is continuing to provide benefits for fisheries and conservation, according to new research by the University of York.

Quick test for Ebola
When diagnosing a case of Ebola, time is of the essence. However, existing diagnostic tests take at least a day or two to yield results, preventing health care workers from quickly determining whether a patient needs immediate treatment and isolation.

New flow battery to keep big cities lit, green and safe
Ensuring the power grid keeps the lights on in large cities could be easier with a new battery design that packs far more energy than any other battery of its kind and size.

'Ecosystem services' help assess ocean energy development
With many projects under development in coastal regions such as New England, tidal power -- which extracts "hydrokinetic" energy from marine environments -- seems poised to join other U.S. commercial power sources.

Researchers find link between inflammation, tissue regeneration and wound repair response
Almost all injuries, even minor skin scratches, trigger an inflammatory response, which provides protection against invading microbes but also turns on regenerative signals needed for healing and injury repair - a process that is generally understood but remains mysterious in its particulars.

Too many food choices exacerbate the battle against obesity, researchers find
Some scientists say that when mothers eat poorly during pregnancy, they pass along traits to their children that make them more likely to have poor diets and have related health problems.

New study finds same patient mortality rates for experienced and new surgeons
There is no statistical difference between the patient mortality rates of new and experienced surgeons a study using a newly developed statistical methodology and conducted by a research team comprised of medical doctors and statisticians has found.

World's challenges demand science changes -- and fast, experts say
World's challenges demand science changes - and fast, experts say. The world has little use - and precious little time -- for detached experts.

Online education tool helps bridge gaps in therapeutic decision-making for advanced NSCLC
A new interactive online tool helps educate practicing oncologists worldwide with therapeutic decision-making for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) based on a patient's molecular and clinical characteristics by providing feedback from an expert panel.

EARTH Magazine: On the trail of treasure in the Rocky Mountains
Can you find the famed treasure chest of Forrest Fenn? Join EARTH roving correspondent Mary Caperton Morton on her quest to find the treasure chest, valued at between $1 million and $2 million dollars, which Fenn, a New Mexico antiquities dealer, has hidden somewhere in the Rocky Mountains north of Santa Fe.

Palbociclib shows promise in patients with hormone-resistant breast cancer
Palbociclib, an investigational oral medication that works by blocking molecules responsible for cancer cell growth, is well tolerated and extends progression-free survival (PFS) in newly diagnosed, advanced breast cancer patients, including those whose disease has stopped responding to traditional endocrine treatments.

Stretch and relax! -- Losing 1 electron switches magnetism on in dichromium
The scientists used the unique Nanocluster Trap experimental station at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin and published their results in the Journal Angewandte Chemie.

Malaria transmission linked to mosquitoes' sexual biology
Sexual biology may be the key to uncovering why Anopheles mosquitoes are unique in their ability to transmit malaria to humans, according to researchers at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and University of Perugia, Italy.

Moffitt researchers identify protein pathway involved in brain tumor stem cell growth
Glioblastomas are a highly aggressive type of brain tumor, with few effective treatment options. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are one step closer to understanding glioblastoma development following the identification of a key protein signaling pathway involved in brain tumor stem cell growth and survival.

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