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Science News and Current Event Archive (2018)

Science news and current events from private research facilities, universities, government agencies and medical centers archive of articles from 2018

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Top Science News and Current Events from 2018


Alligators on the beach? Killer whales in rivers? Get used to it
Sightings of alligators and other large predators in places where conventional wisdom says they 'shouldn't be' have increased in recent years, in large part because local populations, once hunted to near-extinction, are rebounding. (2018-05-07)
Special UV light safely kills airborne flu virus, finds study
Overhead far-UVC light, a type of ultraviolet light that is harmless to humans, effectively killed airborne flu virus, found researchers at Columbia University. (2018-02-09)
JAK inhibitors associated with aggressive lymphoma
Austrian researchers have discovered that a small number of patients taking targeted drugs known as Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors to treat myelofibrosis may develop aggressive lymphomas. (2018-06-15)
UToledo engineer creates solution to cheaper, longer lasting battery packs
The new technology called a bilevel equalizer is the first hybrid that combines the high performance of an active equalizer with the low cost of the passive equalizer. (2018-03-06)
AI 'scientist' finds that toothpaste ingredient may help fight drug-resistant malaria
An ingredient commonly found in toothpaste could be employed as an anti-malarial drug against strains of malaria parasite that have grown resistant to one of the currently used drugs. (2018-01-18)
Converting CO2 into usable energy
Scientists show that single nickel atoms are an efficient, cost-effective catalyst for converting carbon dioxide into useful chemicals. (2018-03-01)
Dartmouth College brings smartwatch innovations to CHI2018
The latest developmental research seeks to increase the functionality of wearables while also adding to the overall user experience. (2018-04-19)
Healthy lifestyle smartphone app slows artery aging
Using a healthy lifestyle smartphone application helps to slow artery ageing, according to results from the EVIDENT II trial presented today at EuroHeartCare 2018, the European Society of Cardiology's annual nursing congress. (2018-06-09)
Penn-developed approach could limit toxicity of CAR T therapy in acute myeloid leukemia
A new approach pioneered at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center may provide a new path towards treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with CAR T cells. (2018-05-31)
BU study: Diagnosing Ebola before symptoms arrive
Boston University researchers studied data from 12 monkeys exposed to Ebola virus, and discovered a common pattern of immune response among the ones that got sick. (2018-03-28)
MD Anderson study evaluates need for biopsies during follow-up care in women with early breast cancer
In an analysis of more than 120,000 women diagnosed with and treated for early-stage breast cancer, researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center determined the rate of additional breast biopsies needed for these patients during their follow-up care. (2018-01-31)
Researchers identify chemical compound that inhibits Ebola virus replication
An organic chemical compound shows effective antiviral activity against Ebola virus and several other viruses, according to a study led by Georgia State University. (2018-03-28)
Potential biomarkers in animals could signal Ebola virus infection before symptoms appear
Scientists have identified potential biomarkers in nonhuman primates exposed to Ebola virus (EBOV) that appeared up to four days before the onset of fever, according to research published today in the journal Science Translational Medicine. (2018-03-28)
New test extends window for accurate detection of zika
Diagnosis of Zika infection is complex. Molecular tests for exposure are only reliable in the first two to three weeks after infection. (2018-03-06)
Video games to improve mobility after a stroke
A joint research by the Basque research center BCBL and the London Imperial College reveals that, after a cerebral infarction, injuries in areas that control attention also cause motility problems. (2018-02-14)
Cooling by laser beam
A laser pulse that for a few picoseconds transforms a material into a high-temperature superconductor. (2018-06-08)
Novel microplate 3D bioprinting platform for muscle & tendon tissue engineering
New research describes the development of a novel screening platform with automated production of 3D muscle- and tendon-like tissues using 3D bioprinting. (2018-06-13)
Improving drone performance in headwinds
Stability of unmanned aerial vehicles in heavy winds can be improved through rotor placement and angle, according to a team from Tohoku University and Kanazawa Institute of Technology. (2018-02-08)
US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement on behavioral counseling to prevent skin cancer
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends behavioral counseling to help reduce the risk of skin cancer from ultraviolet (UV) radiation in persons ages 6 months to 24 years with fair skin types. (2018-03-20)
Scientists uncover why sauna bathing is good for your health
Scientists at the University of Eastern Finland have shown that sauna bathing is associated with a variety of health benefits. (2018-01-05)
Study uncovers key to preventing back pain in runners
Low back pain is a common complaint among both elite and recreational runners, but the true cause of it remains a mystery. (2018-01-03)
Poor dental health increases risks of frailty in older men
Over a three-year period, researchers from the United Kingdom examined the relationship between poor oral health and older adults' risks for becoming frail. (2018-01-04)
Stealth virus for cancer therapy
Scientists from the University of Zurich have redesigned an adenovirus for use in cancer therapy. (2018-01-31)
OSU researchers question conservation community's acceptance of trophy hunting
Researchers at Oregon State University are challenging the premise that trophy hunting is an acceptable and effective tool for wildlife conservation and community development. (2018-05-11)
Access to water and diverse terrain encourage elderly in physical activity
A recently published study, conducted at the Gerontology Research Center of the University of Jyväskylä, found associations between features of natural environment in the home neighborhood and physical activity of older people. (2018-01-29)
Children with chronic illness often show signs of mental health problems
Researchers from the University of Waterloo surveyed children between the ages of six and 16, and all within a month of their diagnosis with asthma, food allergy, epilepsy, diabetes or juvenile arthritis. (2018-01-04)
Study uncovers healthcare disparities among octogenarians and nonagenarians with advanced lung cancer
A new study reveals that, among patients of advanced age with stage III lung cancer, African Americans and individuals who live in lower income areas are more likely to not receive any treatment. (2018-01-08)
Building stronger health systems could help prevent the next epidemic in Madagascar
The peak epidemic season for plague in Madagascar is fast approaching and the severity of these outbreaks could be significantly reduced with improvements to their public health system, argues Matthew Bonds from Harvard Medical School and the nongovernmental health care organization, PIVOT, in a new Viewpoint publishing Jan. (2018-01-04)
Predicting the effect of climate change on crop yields
Scientists now have a new tool to predict the future effects of climate change on crop yields. (2018-01-03)
New 3D imaging analysis technique could lead to improved arthritis treatment
An algorithm to monitor the joints of patients with arthritis, which could change the way that the severity of the condition is assessed, has been developed by a team of engineers, physicians and radiologists led by the University of Cambridge. (2018-06-18)
New epidemiological study finds no connection between cases of cancer and use of plant protection products containing glyphosate
BfR Communication No. 036/2017 from 22 December 2017 Epidemiological studies are a central element of public discussion in the debate surrounding the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate. (2018-01-12)
A look into the fourth dimension
In our daily experience space has three dimensions. Recently, however, a physical phenomenon that only occurs in four spatial dimensions could be observed in two experiments. (2018-01-04)
A laser that smells like a hound
University of Adelaide researchers have created a laser that can 'smell' different gases within a sample. (2018-06-06)
Are vitamin supplements used before or during pregnancy associated with risk of autism spectrum disorder?
The use of folic acid and multivitamin supplements by women before and during pregnancy was associated with a lower likelihood of autism spectrum disorder in children but this finding  needs to be interpreted with caution because other factors could explain it. (2018-01-03)
Science for a resilient EU power grid
The Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, have analysed 16 earthquakes, 15 space weather events and 20 floods, presenting recommendations on how to improve the resilience of the power grid against these natural hazards. (2018-01-04)
Researchers use smart phone to make a faster infection detector
Washington State University researchers have developed a low-cost, portable laboratory on a phone that works nearly as well as clinical laboratories to detect common viral and bacterial infections. (2018-04-24)
NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Ava's landfall on Madagascar's coast
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Ava as it made landfall along the coast of northeastern Madagascar. (2018-01-05)
Aerial robot that can morph in flight
French researchers have drawn inspiration from birds to design an aerial robot capable of altering its profile during flight. (2018-05-31)
For patients with prostate cancer, dysfunction due to treatment side effects results in increased emotional distress -- and vice versa
A new study published in The Journal of Urology reports that men with prostate cancer who had worse urinary, bowel, and sexual function after surgery or radiotherapy than others experienced more emotional distress. (2018-05-31)
Physicists build muscle for shape-changing, cell-sized robots
A Cornell University team has made a robot exoskeleton that can rapidly change its shape upon sensing chemical or thermal changes in its environment. (2018-01-03)
Music really is a universal language
Songs serve many different purposes: accompanying a dance, soothing an infant, or expressing love. (2018-01-25)
Racial differences in age at breast cancer diagnosis challenges use of single age-based screening guidelines
Among women in the US diagnosed with breast cancer, a higher proportion of nonwhite patients were diagnosed at younger than 50 years of age compared to white patients, suggesting that age-based screening guidelines that do not account for race may result in underscreening of nonwhite women. (2018-03-07)
Meet the 'odderon': Large Hadron Collider experiment shows potential evidence of quasiparticle sought for decades
A team of high-energy experimental particle physicists, including several from the University of Kansas, has uncovered possible evidence of a subatomic quasiparticle dubbed an (2018-02-01)
The science behind the fizz: How the bubbles make the beverage
From popping a bottle of champagne for a celebration to cracking open a soda while watching the Super Bowl, everyone is familiar with fizz. (2018-01-31)
Family Medicine and Community Health Journal Volume 5, Issue Number 4 publishes
The December 2017 issue includes an editorial, five original research articles, one case study, one systematic review and two China Focus articles addressing various topics in family medicine in both China and internationally. (2018-01-05)
Mayo discovery means individualized ovarian, brain cancer therapies
Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered that a molecular communication pathway -- thought to be defective in cancer -- is a key player in determining the effectiveness of measles virus oncolytic cancer treatment in ovarian and aggressive brain cancers. (2018-05-16)
Research reveals evidence of new population of ancient Native Americans
Genetic analysis of ancient DNA from a 6-week-old infant found at an Interior Alaska archaeological site has revealed a previously unknown population of ancient people in North America. (2018-01-03)
NASA looks at rainfall intensity in Tropical Depression Bolaven
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite gathered data on rainfall rates occurring in Tropical Depression Bolaven as it moved toward Vietnam. (2018-01-04)
Earth's core and mantle separated in a disorderly fashion
Plumes of hot rock surging upward from the Earth's mantle at volcanic hotspots contain evidence that the Earth's formative years may have been even more chaotic than previously thought, according to new work from a team of Carnegie and Smithsonian scientists published in Nature. (2018-01-24)
'Body on a chip' could improve drug evaluation
MIT engineers have developed new technology that could be used to evaluate new drugs and detect possible side effects before they are approved for human use. (2018-03-14)

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

The Person You Become
Over the course of our lives, we shed parts of our old selves, embrace new ones, and redefine who we are. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas about the experiences that shape the person we become. Guests include aerobatics pilot and public speaker Janine Shepherd, writers Roxane Gay and Taiye Selasi, activist Jackson Bird, and fashion executive Kaustav Dey.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#479 Garden of Marvels (Rebroadcast)
This week we're learning about botany and the colorful science of gardening. Author Ruth Kassinger joins us to discuss her book "A Garden of Marvels: How We Discovered that Flowers Have Sex, Leaves Eat Air, and Other Secrets of the Way Plants Work." And we'll speak to NASA researcher Gioia Massa about her work to solve the technical challenges of gardening in space.