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Science News and Current Event Archive (2018)

Science news and current events from private research facilities, universities, government agencies and medical centers archive of articles from 2018

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Top Science News and Current Events from 2018

Special UV light safely kills airborne flu virus, finds study
Overhead far-UVC light, a type of ultraviolet light that is harmless to humans, effectively killed airborne flu virus, found researchers at Columbia University. (2018-02-09)
UToledo engineer creates solution to cheaper, longer lasting battery packs
The new technology called a bilevel equalizer is the first hybrid that combines the high performance of an active equalizer with the low cost of the passive equalizer. (2018-03-06)
AI 'scientist' finds that toothpaste ingredient may help fight drug-resistant malaria
An ingredient commonly found in toothpaste could be employed as an anti-malarial drug against strains of malaria parasite that have grown resistant to one of the currently used drugs. (2018-01-18)
Converting CO2 into usable energy
Scientists show that single nickel atoms are an efficient, cost-effective catalyst for converting carbon dioxide into useful chemicals. (2018-03-01)
Video games to improve mobility after a stroke
A joint research by the Basque research center BCBL and the London Imperial College reveals that, after a cerebral infarction, injuries in areas that control attention also cause motility problems. (2018-02-14)
MD Anderson study evaluates need for biopsies during follow-up care in women with early breast cancer
In an analysis of more than 120,000 women diagnosed with and treated for early-stage breast cancer, researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center determined the rate of additional breast biopsies needed for these patients during their follow-up care. (2018-01-31)
New test extends window for accurate detection of zika
Diagnosis of Zika infection is complex. Molecular tests for exposure are only reliable in the first two to three weeks after infection. (2018-03-06)
Study uncovers healthcare disparities among octogenarians and nonagenarians with advanced lung cancer
A new study reveals that, among patients of advanced age with stage III lung cancer, African Americans and individuals who live in lower income areas are more likely to not receive any treatment. (2018-01-08)
New epidemiological study finds no connection between cases of cancer and use of plant protection products containing glyphosate
BfR Communication No. 036/2017 from 22 December 2017 Epidemiological studies are a central element of public discussion in the debate surrounding the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate. (2018-01-12)
Improving drone performance in headwinds
Stability of unmanned aerial vehicles in heavy winds can be improved through rotor placement and angle, according to a team from Tohoku University and Kanazawa Institute of Technology. (2018-02-08)
Racial differences in age at breast cancer diagnosis challenges use of single age-based screening guidelines
Among women in the US diagnosed with breast cancer, a higher proportion of nonwhite patients were diagnosed at younger than 50 years of age compared to white patients, suggesting that age-based screening guidelines that do not account for race may result in underscreening of nonwhite women. (2018-03-07)
Poor dental health increases risks of frailty in older men
Over a three-year period, researchers from the United Kingdom examined the relationship between poor oral health and older adults' risks for becoming frail. (2018-01-04)
Scientists uncover why sauna bathing is good for your health
Scientists at the University of Eastern Finland have shown that sauna bathing is associated with a variety of health benefits. (2018-01-05)
Stealth virus for cancer therapy
Scientists from the University of Zurich have redesigned an adenovirus for use in cancer therapy. (2018-01-31)
Study uncovers key to preventing back pain in runners
Low back pain is a common complaint among both elite and recreational runners, but the true cause of it remains a mystery. (2018-01-03)
Are vitamin supplements used before or during pregnancy associated with risk of autism spectrum disorder?
The use of folic acid and multivitamin supplements by women before and during pregnancy was associated with a lower likelihood of autism spectrum disorder in children but this finding  needs to be interpreted with caution because other factors could explain it. (2018-01-03)
Physicists build muscle for shape-changing, cell-sized robots
A Cornell University team has made a robot exoskeleton that can rapidly change its shape upon sensing chemical or thermal changes in its environment. (2018-01-03)
Building stronger health systems could help prevent the next epidemic in Madagascar
The peak epidemic season for plague in Madagascar is fast approaching and the severity of these outbreaks could be significantly reduced with improvements to their public health system, argues Matthew Bonds from Harvard Medical School and the nongovernmental health care organization, PIVOT, in a new Viewpoint publishing Jan. (2018-01-04)
NIH scientists find microbes on the skin of mice promote tissue healing, immunity
Beneficial bacteria on the skin of lab mice work with the animals' immune systems to defend against disease-causing microbes and accelerate wound healing, according to new research from scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. (2018-01-18)
Children with chronic illness often show signs of mental health problems
Researchers from the University of Waterloo surveyed children between the ages of six and 16, and all within a month of their diagnosis with asthma, food allergy, epilepsy, diabetes or juvenile arthritis. (2018-01-04)
A look into the fourth dimension
In our daily experience space has three dimensions. Recently, however, a physical phenomenon that only occurs in four spatial dimensions could be observed in two experiments. (2018-01-04)
Science for a resilient EU power grid
The Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, have analysed 16 earthquakes, 15 space weather events and 20 floods, presenting recommendations on how to improve the resilience of the power grid against these natural hazards. (2018-01-04)
Family Medicine and Community Health Journal Volume 5, Issue Number 4 publishes
The December 2017 issue includes an editorial, five original research articles, one case study, one systematic review and two China Focus articles addressing various topics in family medicine in both China and internationally. (2018-01-05)
Predicting the effect of climate change on crop yields
Scientists now have a new tool to predict the future effects of climate change on crop yields. (2018-01-03)
NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Ava's landfall on Madagascar's coast
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Ava as it made landfall along the coast of northeastern Madagascar. (2018-01-05)
NASA looks at rainfall intensity in Tropical Depression Bolaven
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite gathered data on rainfall rates occurring in Tropical Depression Bolaven as it moved toward Vietnam. (2018-01-04)
The science behind the fizz: How the bubbles make the beverage
From popping a bottle of champagne for a celebration to cracking open a soda while watching the Super Bowl, everyone is familiar with fizz. (2018-01-31)
Meet the 'odderon': Large Hadron Collider experiment shows potential evidence of quasiparticle sought for decades
A team of high-energy experimental particle physicists, including several from the University of Kansas, has uncovered possible evidence of a subatomic quasiparticle dubbed an (2018-02-01)
Music really is a universal language
Songs serve many different purposes: accompanying a dance, soothing an infant, or expressing love. (2018-01-25)
Harnessing the potential of blockchain to transform education
Blockchain technology can help improve old models of data management and bring benefits to learners and educational institutions in the EU -- if policymakers are well prepared to embrace the change. (2018-01-05)
Research reveals evidence of new population of ancient Native Americans
Genetic analysis of ancient DNA from a 6-week-old infant found at an Interior Alaska archaeological site has revealed a previously unknown population of ancient people in North America. (2018-01-03)
Earth's core and mantle separated in a disorderly fashion
Plumes of hot rock surging upward from the Earth's mantle at volcanic hotspots contain evidence that the Earth's formative years may have been even more chaotic than previously thought, according to new work from a team of Carnegie and Smithsonian scientists published in Nature. (2018-01-24)
Girls' social camouflage skills may delay or prevent autism diagnosis
On parent-reporting measures, girls with autism seem to struggle more than boys with performing routine tasks like getting up and dressed or making small talk, even when the study group is normalized to meet similar basic clinical diagnostic criteria across sexes. (2018-01-04)
Curbing climate change
Humans may be the dominant cause of global temperature rise, but they may also be a crucial factor in helping to reduce it, according to a new study that for the first time builds a novel model to measure the effects of behavior on climate. (2018-01-01)
Pediatricians screen more kids for mental health issues if they receive hands-on support
The study, led by Children's National, is called an important first step toward earlier identification of children who live with serious mental health concerns. (2018-01-03)
Zebrafish study provides new insights into autism spectrum disorder research
Exposure to a compound used to treat migraines and seizures causes characteristics associated with autism, groundbreaking research with zebrafish has demonstrated. (2018-01-24)
New brain mapping technique highlights relationship between connectivity and IQ
A new and relatively simple technique for mapping the wiring of the brain has shown a correlation between how well connected an individual's brain regions are and their intelligence, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2018-01-02)
Tobacco shops associated with crime in urban communities of color
Tobacco shops, also known as smoke shops, may represent potential 'nuisance properties' in urban communities of color, a study led by a researcher at the University of California, Riverside has found. (2018-01-05)
Aerobic exercise may mildly delay, slightly improve Alzheimer's symptoms
Geriatrics experts have suggested that exercising can improve brain health in older adults. (2018-01-26)
Tuberculosis drugs work better with vitamin C
Studies in mice and in tissue cultures suggest that giving vitamin C with tuberculosis drugs could reduce the unusually long time it takes these drugs to eradicate this pathogen. (2018-01-03)
Exploring electrolysis for energy storage
A research team at Kyushu University's International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (I2CNER) developed a flow-type polymer electrolyte cell for power storage. (2018-01-02)
Frequency of autism spectrum disorder in US stable in recent years
The frequency of autism spectrum disorder among US children and adolescents was stable from 2014-2016 based on data from a nationally representative annual survey. (2018-01-02)
X chromosome reactivation could treat Rett syndrome, other X-linked disorders
A study from a team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators points toward a potential strategy for treating X-linked disorders -- those caused by mutations in the X chromosome -- in females. (2018-01-04)
NASA study: First direct proof of ozone hole recovery due to chemicals ban
For the first time, scientists have shown through direct satellite observations of the ozone hole that levels of ozone-destroying chlorine are declining, resulting in less ozone depletion. (2018-01-04)
Simple breathing training with a physiotherapist before surgery prevents postoperative pneumonia
Pneumonia, and other serious lung complications, after major abdominal surgery were halved when patients were seen by a physiotherapist before surgery and taught breathing exercises that the patient needed to start performing immediately on waking from the operation, finds a trial published by The BMJ today. (2018-01-24)
Researchers offer new evidence on 4-year-old children's knowledge about ecology
What do young children from diverse cultural communities think about the natural world? (2018-01-03)
Eating more foods with choline during pregnancy could boost baby's brain
When expectant mothers consume sufficient amounts of the nutrient choline during pregnancy, their offspring gain enduring cognitive benefits, a new Cornell University study suggests. (2018-01-04)
Total-body PET: Maximizing sensitivity for clinical research and patient care
The new total-body PET/CT scanner could revolutionize our understanding and treatment of disease through analysis of better imaging data from the whole body. (2018-01-03)
Impact of inactivity on muscles more severe for older people
According to a recent study published in The Journal of Physiology, researchers have been able to document for the first time how the same period of inactivity has a greater and more severe impact on the muscle power of the lower limbs of the elderly than young people, which is essential for movements like climbing the stairs. (2018-01-04)
New research suggests toward end of Ice Age, human beings witnessed fires larger than dinosaur killers
12,800 years ago, thanks to fragments of a comet, humans saw an astonishing 10 percent of the Earth's land surface, or about 10 million square kilometers, consumed by fires. (2018-02-01)

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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