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Science News Archive | Brightsurf | (2019)

Science news and current events archive from 2019

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Top Science Current Events and Science News from 2019


Star tours
Astronomers have a new tool in their search for extraterrestrial life -- a sophisticated bot that helps identify stars hosting planets similar to Jupiter and Saturn. (2019-06-25)
Life on Mars?
Researchers from Hungary have discovered embedded organic material in a Martian meteorite found in the late 1970s. (2019-04-04)
Beat the heat
University of Utah mechanical engineering associate professor Mathieu Francoeur has discovered a way to produce more electricity from heat than thought possible by creating a silicon chip, also known as a 'device,' that converts more thermal radiation into electricity. (2019-07-10)
A varied menu
Freiburg biologists have analyzed in detail for the first time which animals are captured by the carnivorous waterwheel plant (2019-03-25)
Slime travelers
New UC Riverside-led research settles a longstanding debate about whether the most ancient animal communities were deliberately mobile. (2019-06-20)
From rain to flood
Extreme weather events, such as thunderstorms or heavy rainfall and the resulting floods, influence Earth and environmental systems in the long term. (2019-06-13)
Rust never sleeps
PNNL researchers have been able to observe in unprecedented detail how rust happens. (2019-02-04)
Not silent at all
The so-called 'silent' or 'synonymous' genetic alterations do not result in altered proteins. (2019-06-12)
Sensing shakes
Every year earthquakes worldwide claim hundreds or even thousands of lives. (2019-03-10)
IMpower131
Patients with Stage IV squamous non-small cell lung cancer enrolled in clinical trial to test the immunotherapy atezolizumab and chemotherapy against chemotherapy alone experienced a longer survival rate, among a subgroup of patients with high PD-LI. (2019-09-10)
Marine oil snow
Marine snow is the phenomena of flakes of falling organic material and biological debris cascading down a water column like snowflakes. (2019-06-11)
The age of water
Groundwater in Egypt's aquifers may be as much as 200,000 years old and that's important to know as officials in that country seek to increasing the use of groundwater, especially in the Eastern Desert, to mitigate growing water stress and allow for agricultural projects. (2019-05-23)
Eating the flu
Given the importance and wide distribution of Influenza A viruses, it is surprising how little is known about infections of wild mammals. (2019-03-06)
Insect food webs
Biological diversity stabilizes species interactions. (2019-03-06)
Meet the tenrecs
Researchers reviewed the conservation priorities for the 31 species of tenrec -- a poorly understood family of small mammals superficially resembling hedgehogs, found only on the island of Madagascar. (2019-05-16)
Weyl goes chiral
Quasiparticles that behave like massless fermions, known as Weyl fermions, have been in recent years at the center of a string of exciting findings in condensed matter physics. (2019-02-11)
Size is everything
The susceptibility of ecosystems to disruption depends on a lot of factors that can't all be grasped. (2019-05-20)
Holy crocodiles
Sebastian Brackhane of the University of Freiburg has researched the cultural status of the reptiles in East Timor. (2019-07-02)
Sources and sinks
For the entire history of our species, humans have lived on a planet capped by a chunk of ice at each pole. (2019-03-14)
Science reveals improvements in Roman building techniques
In research published in EPJ Plus, researchers have carried out scientific analysis of the materials used to build the Atrium Vestae in Rome. (2019-10-25)
One among many
Anyone moving in a large crowd, absorbed in their phone and yet avoiding collisions, follows certain laws that they themselves create. (2019-03-12)
Fragmented turtles
Scientists looked at how fragmentation is affecting critically endangered Dahl's toad headed turtle (Mesoclemmys dahli) a forest-stream specialist found only in Colombia. (2019-05-09)
Outcompeting cancer
Suppressing the capacity of tumors to destroy the healthy tissue that surrounds them is essential for fighting cancer-induced morbidity and mortality. (2019-07-24)
Storage wars
One answer to our greenhouse gas challenges may be right under our feet: Soil scientists Oliver Chadwick of UC Santa Barbara and Marc Kramer of Washington State University have found that minerals in soil can hold on to a significant amount of carbon pulled from the atmosphere. (2019-01-02)
Good genes
A team of scientists from NAU, Arizona State University, the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, the Center for Coastal Studies in Massachusetts and nine other institutions worldwide to study potential cancer suppression mechanisms in cetaceans, the mammalian group that includes whales, dolphins and porpoises. (2019-05-09)
Hopping bacteria
Scientists have long known that key models of bacterial movement in real-world conditions are flawed. (2019-05-06)
From sea to lab
With its vast numbers of different lifeforms, the sea is a largely unexplored source of natural products that could be starting points for new pharmaceuticals, such as the antitumor drugs trabectedin and lurbinectedin. (2019-02-18)
Sloppy sea urchins
Marine scientists discover an important, overlooked role sea urchins play in the kelp forest ecosystem. (2019-07-10)
Choosy amphipods
Amphipods of the species Gammarus roeselii guard their chosen mates, often carrying them with them for days and defending them against potential rivals. (2019-02-07)
Robotic 'gray goo'
Researchers at Columbia Engineering and MIT Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), demonstrate for the first time a way to make a robot composed of many loosely coupled components, or 'particles.' Unlike swarm or modular robots, each component is simple, and has no individual address or identity. (2019-03-20)
Sudden aging
Coralline red algae have existed for 130 million years, in other words since the Cretaceous Period, the time of the dinosaurs. (2019-01-16)
Wheat myth debunked
Common opinion has it that modern wheat is so reliant on fertiliser and crop protection agrochemicals that the plants now lack the hardiness needed to remain productive under harsher environmental conditions. (2019-06-17)
Copying made easy
Whether revealing a perpetrator with DNA evidence, diagnosing a pathogen, classifying a paleontological discovery, or determining paternity, the duplication of nucleic acids (amplification) is indispensable. (2019-03-12)
Global danger
Freiburg hydrologist presents new results showing how sinking groundwater levels threaten the vitality of riverine ecosystems (2019-10-04)
Nature hits rewind
The study of evolution is revealing new complexities, showing how the traits most beneficial to the fitness of individual plants and animals are not always the ones we see in nature. (2019-03-19)
Persistent plume
Thunderstorms generated by a group of giant wildfires in 2017 injected a small volcano's worth of aerosol into the stratosphere, creating a smoke plume that lasted for almost nine months. (2019-08-08)
Following the light
Considering that light is the driving force behind the growth and productivity of reef ecosystems, scientists are interested in understanding the relationship between primary productivity and varying light conditions. (2019-02-05)
A cosmic pretzel
Astronomers using ALMA have obtained an extremely high-resolution image showing two disks in which young stars are growing, fed by a complex pretzel-shaped network of filaments of gas and dust. (2019-10-04)
Easy on the eyes
New computer program uses artificial intelligence to determine what visual neurons like to see. (2019-05-02)
Reef engineers
The next time you find yourself luxuriating in some exotic, Instagrammable vacation spot, thank a parrotfish. (2019-04-30)
Prehistoric AC
Tyrannosaurus rex, one of the largest meat-eating dinosaurs on the planet, had an air conditioner in its head, suggest scientists from the University of Missouri, Ohio University and University of Florida, while challenging over a century of previous beliefs. (2019-09-04)
A question of time
Researchers show how the immune system distinguishes between self molecules and non-self molecules such as those from pathogens. (2019-05-03)
Mowing for monarchs
You might think that mowing fields wouldn't benefit monarch butterfly populations. (2019-03-12)
All too human
Professor Rony Paz of the Weizmann Institute of Science suggests that our brains are like modern washing machines -- evolved to have the latest sophisticated programming, but more vulnerable to breakdown and prone to develop costly disorders. (2019-01-22)
Coupled proteins
Researchers from Heidelberg University and Sendai University in Japan used new biotechnological methods to study how human cells react to and further process external signals. (2019-07-01)
Earthquake symmetry
A recent study investigated around 100,000 localized seismic events to search for patterns in the data. (2019-09-04)
Balancing the gut
Researchers from the Cluster of Excellence 'Precision Medicine in Chronic Inflammation' in Kiel and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have uncovered a critical mechanism that controls immune reactions against microorganisms in the intestine. (2019-02-26)
Methods and models
It's a well-known fact that the ocean is one of the biggest absorbers of the carbon dioxide emitted by way of human activity. (2019-06-19)
Grains in the rain
Of the major food crops, only rice is currently able to survive flooding. (2019-09-19)
Speed of light: Toward a future quantum internet
University of Toronto Engineering researchers have demonstrated proof-of-principle for a device that could serve as the backbone of a future quantum Internet. (2019-01-28)

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