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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf Archive (2019)

Science current events and science news from private research facilities, universities, government agencies and medical centers archive of articles from 2019

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Top Science Current Events and Science News from 2019


Life on Mars?
Researchers from Hungary have discovered embedded organic material in a Martian meteorite found in the late 1970s. (2019-04-04)
Eating the flu
Given the importance and wide distribution of Influenza A viruses, it is surprising how little is known about infections of wild mammals. (2019-03-06)
A varied menu
Freiburg biologists have analyzed in detail for the first time which animals are captured by the carnivorous waterwheel plant (2019-03-25)
Insect food webs
Biological diversity stabilizes species interactions. (2019-03-06)
Sensing shakes
Every year earthquakes worldwide claim hundreds or even thousands of lives. (2019-03-10)
Rust never sleeps
PNNL researchers have been able to observe in unprecedented detail how rust happens. (2019-02-04)
Storage wars
One answer to our greenhouse gas challenges may be right under our feet: Soil scientists Oliver Chadwick of UC Santa Barbara and Marc Kramer of Washington State University have found that minerals in soil can hold on to a significant amount of carbon pulled from the atmosphere. (2019-01-02)
Sources and sinks
For the entire history of our species, humans have lived on a planet capped by a chunk of ice at each pole. (2019-03-14)
One among many
Anyone moving in a large crowd, absorbed in their phone and yet avoiding collisions, follows certain laws that they themselves create. (2019-03-12)
Meet the tenrecs
Researchers reviewed the conservation priorities for the 31 species of tenrec -- a poorly understood family of small mammals superficially resembling hedgehogs, found only on the island of Madagascar. (2019-05-16)
From sea to lab
With its vast numbers of different lifeforms, the sea is a largely unexplored source of natural products that could be starting points for new pharmaceuticals, such as the antitumor drugs trabectedin and lurbinectedin. (2019-02-18)
The age of water
Groundwater in Egypt's aquifers may be as much as 200,000 years old and that's important to know as officials in that country seek to increasing the use of groundwater, especially in the Eastern Desert, to mitigate growing water stress and allow for agricultural projects. (2019-05-23)
Choosy amphipods
Amphipods of the species Gammarus roeselii guard their chosen mates, often carrying them with them for days and defending them against potential rivals. (2019-02-07)
Sudden aging
Coralline red algae have existed for 130 million years, in other words since the Cretaceous Period, the time of the dinosaurs. (2019-01-16)
Nature hits rewind
The study of evolution is revealing new complexities, showing how the traits most beneficial to the fitness of individual plants and animals are not always the ones we see in nature. (2019-03-19)
Not silent at all
The so-called 'silent' or 'synonymous' genetic alterations do not result in altered proteins. (2019-06-12)
Weyl goes chiral
Quasiparticles that behave like massless fermions, known as Weyl fermions, have been in recent years at the center of a string of exciting findings in condensed matter physics. (2019-02-11)
Easy on the eyes
New computer program uses artificial intelligence to determine what visual neurons like to see. (2019-05-02)
Robotic 'gray goo'
Researchers at Columbia Engineering and MIT Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), demonstrate for the first time a way to make a robot composed of many loosely coupled components, or 'particles.' Unlike swarm or modular robots, each component is simple, and has no individual address or identity. (2019-03-20)
Copying made easy
Whether revealing a perpetrator with DNA evidence, diagnosing a pathogen, classifying a paleontological discovery, or determining paternity, the duplication of nucleic acids (amplification) is indispensable. (2019-03-12)
Fragmented turtles
Scientists looked at how fragmentation is affecting critically endangered Dahl's toad headed turtle (Mesoclemmys dahli) a forest-stream specialist found only in Colombia. (2019-05-09)
Size is everything
The susceptibility of ecosystems to disruption depends on a lot of factors that can't all be grasped. (2019-05-20)
Following the light
Considering that light is the driving force behind the growth and productivity of reef ecosystems, scientists are interested in understanding the relationship between primary productivity and varying light conditions. (2019-02-05)
All too human
Professor Rony Paz of the Weizmann Institute of Science suggests that our brains are like modern washing machines -- evolved to have the latest sophisticated programming, but more vulnerable to breakdown and prone to develop costly disorders. (2019-01-22)
Balancing the gut
Researchers from the Cluster of Excellence 'Precision Medicine in Chronic Inflammation' in Kiel and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have uncovered a critical mechanism that controls immune reactions against microorganisms in the intestine. (2019-02-26)
Beyond romance
Love can make us do crazy things. It often prompts us to behave in counterintuitive ways, like, for example, placing the wellbeing of our loved ones above our own. (2019-02-11)
Reef engineers
The next time you find yourself luxuriating in some exotic, Instagrammable vacation spot, thank a parrotfish. (2019-04-30)
Speed of light: Toward a future quantum internet
University of Toronto Engineering researchers have demonstrated proof-of-principle for a device that could serve as the backbone of a future quantum Internet. (2019-01-28)
BJC press notice
Please contact the BJC press office for the full paper or with any other questions on 0203 469 8300, out of hours, 07050 264 059 or bjcpress@cancer.org.uk. (2019-03-19)
The pressure's off
Scientists reveal activated structure of a receptor critical for blood pressure, salt homeostasis. (2019-01-10)
Pink or brown?
They're neither white and gold or black and blue. But in an optical puzzle akin to The Dress, colourful snails are causing scientists at the University of Nottingham to turn to technology to definitively decide whether some snails' shells are pink or brown. (2019-02-25)
Rigs to reefs
Offshore oil platforms have an immense presence, physically, financially and environmentally. (2019-01-31)
Micromotors deliver oral vaccines
Vaccines have saved millions of lives, but nobody likes getting a shot. (2019-02-06)
Columbia engineers translate brain signals directly into speech
In a scientific first, Columbia neuroengineers have created a system that translates thought into intelligible, recognizable speech. (2019-01-29)
SUTD researchers developed customizable microfluidic nozzles for generating complex emulsions
Researchers from SUTD developed customizable microfluidic nozzles using the modules of 3D printed fittings and fluidic units. (2019-01-31)
A question of time
Researchers show how the immune system distinguishes between self molecules and non-self molecules such as those from pathogens. (2019-05-03)
Parents unknown
Animals in hard-to-reach places, especially strange, 'unattractive,' animals, may completely escape our attention. (2019-05-13)
Vapor drives a liquid-solid transition in a molecular system
The reversible switching of macrocyclic molecules between a liquid and a solid phase upon exposure to vapor has been reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society by researchers at Kanazawa University. (2019-03-27)
Scientists of the Samara Polytech have developed a new method for wells designing
The methodical approach of wells design, developed at the Oil and Gas Wells Drilling Department, will allow to obtain more accurate information about the field and predict problems that may arise during the operation on the well. (2019-01-23)
Electronic tool has potential to improve asthma care, study finds
A new electronic decision support tool for managing asthma has the potential to improve the quality of asthma care in primary care settings, suggests a study led by St. (2019-02-14)
Gummy-like robots that could help prevent disease
EPFL scientists have developed microscopic, hydrogel-based muscles that can manipulate and mechanically stimulate biological tissue. (2019-02-08)
Artificial intelligence can dramatically cut time needed to process abnormal chest X-rays
New research has found that a novel Artificial Intelligence (AI) system can dramatically reduce the time needed to ensure that abnormal chest X-rays with critical findings will receive an expert radiologist opinion sooner, cutting the average delay from 11 days to less than three days. (2019-01-22)
Hopping bacteria
Scientists have long known that key models of bacterial movement in real-world conditions are flawed. (2019-05-06)
Artificial intelligence advances threaten privacy of health data
Advances in artificial intelligence, including activity trackers, smartphones and smartwatches, threaten the privacy of people's health data, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley. (2019-01-03)
New quantum system could help design better spintronics
Researchers have created a new testing ground for quantum systems in which they can literally turn certain particle interactions on and off, potentially paving the way for advances in spintronics. (2019-01-29)
A simulator allows patients to experiment how their vision will improve before surgery
For the first time, patients will be able to experience how their vision will improve after a cataract surgery just before being operated. (2019-02-07)
Good neighbors
In the animal kingdom, food access is among the biggest drivers of habitat preference. (2019-01-22)
Good genes
A team of scientists from NAU, Arizona State University, the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, the Center for Coastal Studies in Massachusetts and nine other institutions worldwide to study potential cancer suppression mechanisms in cetaceans, the mammalian group that includes whales, dolphins and porpoises. (2019-05-09)
Crocodile face off
Despite often being portrayed as creatures that have remained virtually unchanged for millions of years, a new Harvard study shows crocodiles have repeatedly altered their developmental patterns, leading to much of the diversity found in modern, living crocodiles. (2019-02-20)
Measuring AI's ability to learn is difficult
Organizations looking to benefit from the artificial intelligence (AI) revolution should be cautious about putting all their eggs in one basket, a study from the University of Waterloo has found. (2019-01-17)

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