Nav: Home

Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf Archive (2019)

Science current events and science news from private research facilities, universities, government agencies and medical centers archive of articles from 2019

Show All Years  •  2019

• January (1133)


Top Science Current Events and Science News from 2019


Artificial intelligence advances threaten privacy of health data
Advances in artificial intelligence, including activity trackers, smartphones and smartwatches, threaten the privacy of people's health data, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley. (2019-01-03)
Measuring AI's ability to learn is difficult
Organizations looking to benefit from the artificial intelligence (AI) revolution should be cautious about putting all their eggs in one basket, a study from the University of Waterloo has found. (2019-01-17)
Seawater turns into freshwater through solar energy: A new low-cost technology
A study conducted at Politecnico di Torino and published by the journal Nature Sustainability promotes an innovative and low-cost technology to turn seawater into drinking water, thanks to the use of solar energy alone. (2019-01-07)
New materials could 'drive wound healing' by harnessing natural healing methods
Imperial researchers have developed new bioinspired material that interacts with surrounding tissues to promote healing. (2019-01-07)
WVU researchers find telemedicine may increase patient satisfaction with medical care
A recent study led by Albeir Mousa, a professor in the West Virginia University School of Medicine, suggests telemedicine may improve patients' satisfaction with their postoperative care as well as their quality of life. (2019-01-02)
UMN researchers describe need for health systems to improve care of gender non-binary patients
A perspective piece authored by UMN Medical School researchers and published in the New England Journal of Medicine uncovers significant healthcare disparities for individuals who identify as neither male nor female or may not identify as having a gender. (2019-01-07)
Long-term trauma outcomes heavily impacted by gender and education level
Researchers find sociodemographic factors more predictive of worse outcomes than injury severity. (2019-01-03)
Scientists turn carbon emissions into usable energy
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a system that turn carbon emissions into usable energy. (2019-01-19)
One in 4 women at sexual health clinics reports coercion over their reproductive lives
As many as one in four women attending sexual and reproductive healthcare services say they are not allowed to take control of their own reproductive lives, reveals a review of the available evidence, published today in BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health. (2019-01-07)
Can a video game-based 'digital medicine' help children with autism and co-occurring ADHD?
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) evaluated a digital medicine tool designed as an investigational treatment for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and co-occurring attention/deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (2019-01-03)
Childhood body composition may help determine future lung health
Boys and girls with more muscle mass in childhood and adolescence have higher lung function. (2019-01-11)
Heart cell defect identified as possible cause of heart failure in pregnancy
A new Tel Aviv University study reveals that one of the possible primary causes of heart failure in pregnant women is a functional heart cell defect. (2019-01-02)
New measure of equality reveals a fuller picture of male well-being
Researchers from the University of Missouri and University of Essex in the United Kingdom say a new way of measuring gender inequality is fairer to both men and women, and presents a simplified but more accurate picture of peoples' well-being than previous calculations. (2019-01-03)
Surrey AI predicts cancer patients' symptoms
Doctors could get a head start treating cancer thanks to new AI developed at the University of Surrey that is able to predict symptoms and their severity throughout the course of a patient's treatment. (2019-01-02)
Improved maternity care practices decrease racial gaps in breastfeeding in the US South
A new paper published in Pediatrics links successful implementation of Baby-Friendly™ practices in the southern US with increases in breastfeeding rates and improved, evidence-based care. (2019-01-18)
Does opioid use in pets create higher risk for abuse in humans?
The increase in opioid prescriptions for people over the past decade may have been paralleled by an increase in opioid prescriptions for pets, according to a study from researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine and the School of Veterinary Medicine. (2019-01-11)
Pre-Medicare years bring health insurance worries for many, U-M/AARP poll finds
With the dawn of a new year, most Americans have just started a new health insurance coverage period -- whether they receive their coverage through a job, buy it themselves or have a government plan. (2019-01-03)
An errant editing enzyme promotes tumor suppressor loss and leukemia propagation
UC San Diego researchers have found a stem cell enzyme copy edits more than 20 tumor types, providing new therapeutic target for preventing cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. (2019-01-03)
Calcium specks may help detect heart disease in South Asians
Specks of calcium in the heart's artery walls could be an important prognostic marker of early cardiovascular disease in South Asians and may help guide treatment in this population, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco. (2019-01-11)
Salk team reveals clues into early development of autism spectrum disorder
Researchers at the Salk Institute compared stem cells created from individuals with ASD against stem cells created from those without ASD to uncover, for the first time, measurable differences in the patterns and speed of development in the ASD-derived cells. (2019-01-07)
The human brain works backwards to retrieve memories
When we remember a past event, the human brain reconstructs that experience in reverse order, according to a new study at the University of Birmingham. (2019-01-14)
Quantum chemistry on quantum computers
A new quantum algorithm has been implemented for quantum chemical calculations on quantum computers to predict complex chemical reactions without exponential/combinatorial explosion, giving exact solutions of Schroedinger Equations for chemistry, for the first time. (2019-01-02)
New study provides clinicians with better analysis of psychological flexibility
New research from the University of Chichester, published in Behavior Modification, has for the first time analyzed degrees of psychological flexibility and identified three distinct classes. (2019-01-11)
Anxiety-depressive disorder changes brain genes activity
Russian neuroscientists discovered that anxiety-depressive disorder in mice is associated with impaired energy metabolism in the brain. (2019-01-07)
Adolescents who self-harm more likely to commit violent crime
Young people who self-harm are three times more likely to commit violent crime than those who do not, according to new research from the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University. (2019-01-04)
Exposure to sugary breakfast cereal advertising directly influences children's diets
Laboratory studies have shown that kids will request and prefer brands they have seen recently advertised on TV. (2019-01-07)
Selection and reselection processes of executive political positions are gender biased
Although male over-representation in politics is a worldwide phenomenon, the executive is the most male-dominated branch. (2019-01-11)
Researchers reveal new mechanism to 'activate' the immune system against cancer
A new mechanism for activating the immune system against cancer cells allows immune cells to detect and destroy cancer cells better than before, and most effectively in lung cancer and melanoma. (2019-01-04)
Nutritional status in adolescent girls
In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health, Smitha Malenahalli Chandrashekarappa et al. consider socio-demographic variables that might be contributing to malnutrition in the age group between 16-19 years (late adolescence). (2019-01-04)
Cancer cells steer a jagged path
Researchers at Rice University and the Duke University School of Medicine define the role of a jagged ligand, JAG1, in cancer cells' ability to differentiate and metastasize, making them harder to track down and eliminate. (2019-01-03)
Could gulls' wings inspire smarter airplane design?
Flexing a single elbow joint enables gulls to adapt their wing shape to gusty conditions, according to new University of British Columbia (UBC) research--a relatively simple mechanism that could inspire improved aircraft design. (2019-01-03)
Obese mice lose anxiety when 'zombie cells' exit their brain
Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators have shown in mice that obesity increases the level of 'zombie' or senescent cells in the brain, and that those cells, in turn, are linked to anxiety. (2019-01-03)
Quantum scientists demonstrate world-first 3D atomic-scale quantum chip architecture
UNSW scientists have shown that their pioneering single atom technology can be adapted to building 3D silicon quantum chips -- with precise interlayer alignment and highly accurate measurement of spin states. (2019-01-07)
Cardiac events, stroke lead to loss of work, reduced income in survivors of working age
People who have experienced a heart attack (myocardial infarction), stroke or cardiac arrest are significantly less likely to be working than healthy people, and if they are working, on average have lower incomes, found a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-01-07)
Gut microbiome in digestive health: a new frontier in research
Research on the gut microbiome is one of the most promising areas of science today. (2019-01-04)
How does the brain learn by talking to itself?
One of the greatest challenges of systems neuroscience is to explain how synaptic connections change to support adaptive behaviours. (2019-01-02)
Racial disparities in asthma related to health care access, environmental factors
In the United States, racial disparities in asthma prevalence, morbidity and mortality can largely be explained by looking at socioeconomic and environmental factors, such as access to healthcare. (2019-01-11)
The first case of a Portuguese beetle living exclusively in groundwater
A diving beetle demonstrating various adaptations to the life underground, including depigmentation and evolutionary loss of eyes, was discovered in the cave Soprador do Carvalho, Portugal. (2019-01-08)
Genetic testing does not cause undue worry for breast cancer patients
As genetic testing for breast cancer has become more complex, evaluating a panel of multiple genes, it introduces more uncertainty about the results. (2019-01-04)
Being HIV positive and staying on antiretroviral therapy in Africa: A systematic review
An international team of researchers have carried out a review of the evidence examining what influences people who are HIV positive to go to health services and then stay on antiretroviral drugs in Africa. (2019-01-11)
Reviewing advanced applications in drug delivery and medicine
This review seeks to analyze current advances of potential applications of graphene and its family of nano-materials for drug delivery and other major biomedical purposes. (2019-01-11)
Study: Technology and doctors combine to detect patients who don't take their pills
Almost everyone does it at some point -- skip a dose of a medication, decide to not schedule a recommended follow-up appointment or ignore doctor's orders to eat or exercise differently. (2019-01-03)
Our bodies may cure themselves of diabetes in the future
Our bodies may cure themselves of diabetes in the future. (2019-01-04)
New study shows physician-targeted marketing is associated with increase in opioid overdose deaths
New research from NYU School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center published online Jan. (2019-01-18)
Revised Brazilian forest code may lead to increased legal deforestation in Amazon
Researchers show that up to 15 million hectares of forest risk losing protection owing to a new clause in the law under which state governments can let private landowners protect only 50 percent of their property, down from 80 percent previously, if over 65 percent of the state is protected by conservation units or indigenous reservations. (2019-01-04)
Improved treatment for alcohol use disorders, chronic pain, mood disorders
A Purdue University team is making drug discoveries to support millions around the world dealing with alcohol use disorders, chronic pain and mood disorders. (2019-01-03)
Eating your veggies, even in space
Travelling to Mars will require astronauts to grow their own food. (2019-01-04)
Study details a path for treating Latinos with mental health and substance misuse symptoms
A team of researchers at the Disparities Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital -- in collaboration with two teams in Spain and collaborators in the US and Puerto Rico -- has tested a novel preventive intervention designed to provide tailored treatment for Latino immigrants with both mental health and substance misuse symptoms. (2019-01-11)
NUS study finds that severe air pollution affects the productivity of workers
Economists from the National University of Singapore have completed an extensive study which reveals that exposure to air pollution over several weeks is not just unhealthy, it can also reduce employee productivity. (2019-01-03)
Fluctuating personal income may be associated with an increased heart disease risk
Young adults who had two or more significant drops in income over a 15-year period had nearly double the risk of cardiovascular disease or dying prematurely. (2019-01-07)

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Approaching With Kindness
We often forget to say the words "thank you." But can those two words change how you — and those around you — look at the world? This hour, TED speakers on the power of gratitude and appreciation. Guests include author AJ Jacobs, author and former baseball player Mike Robbins, Dr. Laura Trice, Professor of Management Christine Porath, and former Danish politician Özlem Cekic.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#509 Anisogamy: The Beginning of Male and Female
This week we discuss how the sperm and egg came to be, and how a difference of reproductive interest has led to sexual conflict in bed bugs. We'll be speaking with Dr. Geoff Parker, an evolutionary biologist credited with developing a theory to explain the evolution of two sexes, about anisogamy, sexual reproduction through the fusion of two different gametes: the egg and the sperm. Then we'll speak with Dr. Roberto Pereira, research scientist in urban entomology at the University of Florida, about traumatic insemination in bed bugs.