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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf Archive (2019)

Science current events and science news from private research facilities, universities, government agencies and medical centers archive of articles from 2019

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Top Science Current Events and Science News from 2019


Eating the flu
Given the importance and wide distribution of Influenza A viruses, it is surprising how little is known about infections of wild mammals. (2019-03-06)
Insect food webs
Biological diversity stabilizes species interactions. (2019-03-06)
Speed of light: Toward a future quantum internet
University of Toronto Engineering researchers have demonstrated proof-of-principle for a device that could serve as the backbone of a future quantum Internet. (2019-01-28)
Sudden aging
Coralline red algae have existed for 130 million years, in other words since the Cretaceous Period, the time of the dinosaurs. (2019-01-16)
Columbia engineers translate brain signals directly into speech
In a scientific first, Columbia neuroengineers have created a system that translates thought into intelligible, recognizable speech. (2019-01-29)
Rust never sleeps
PNNL researchers have been able to observe in unprecedented detail how rust happens. (2019-02-04)
SUTD researchers developed customizable microfluidic nozzles for generating complex emulsions
Researchers from SUTD developed customizable microfluidic nozzles using the modules of 3D printed fittings and fluidic units. (2019-01-31)
Micromotors deliver oral vaccines
Vaccines have saved millions of lives, but nobody likes getting a shot. (2019-02-06)
Electronic tool has potential to improve asthma care, study finds
A new electronic decision support tool for managing asthma has the potential to improve the quality of asthma care in primary care settings, suggests a study led by St. (2019-02-14)
Gummy-like robots that could help prevent disease
EPFL scientists have developed microscopic, hydrogel-based muscles that can manipulate and mechanically stimulate biological tissue. (2019-02-08)
Storage wars
One answer to our greenhouse gas challenges may be right under our feet: Soil scientists Oliver Chadwick of UC Santa Barbara and Marc Kramer of Washington State University have found that minerals in soil can hold on to a significant amount of carbon pulled from the atmosphere. (2019-01-02)
Scientists of the Samara Polytech have developed a new method for wells designing
The methodical approach of wells design, developed at the Oil and Gas Wells Drilling Department, will allow to obtain more accurate information about the field and predict problems that may arise during the operation on the well. (2019-01-23)
Artificial intelligence can dramatically cut time needed to process abnormal chest X-rays
New research has found that a novel Artificial Intelligence (AI) system can dramatically reduce the time needed to ensure that abnormal chest X-rays with critical findings will receive an expert radiologist opinion sooner, cutting the average delay from 11 days to less than three days. (2019-01-22)
One among many
Anyone moving in a large crowd, absorbed in their phone and yet avoiding collisions, follows certain laws that they themselves create. (2019-03-12)
From sea to lab
With its vast numbers of different lifeforms, the sea is a largely unexplored source of natural products that could be starting points for new pharmaceuticals, such as the antitumor drugs trabectedin and lurbinectedin. (2019-02-18)
Artificial intelligence advances threaten privacy of health data
Advances in artificial intelligence, including activity trackers, smartphones and smartwatches, threaten the privacy of people's health data, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley. (2019-01-03)
New quantum system could help design better spintronics
Researchers have created a new testing ground for quantum systems in which they can literally turn certain particle interactions on and off, potentially paving the way for advances in spintronics. (2019-01-29)
A simulator allows patients to experiment how their vision will improve before surgery
For the first time, patients will be able to experience how their vision will improve after a cataract surgery just before being operated. (2019-02-07)
Following the light
Considering that light is the driving force behind the growth and productivity of reef ecosystems, scientists are interested in understanding the relationship between primary productivity and varying light conditions. (2019-02-05)
Measuring AI's ability to learn is difficult
Organizations looking to benefit from the artificial intelligence (AI) revolution should be cautious about putting all their eggs in one basket, a study from the University of Waterloo has found. (2019-01-17)
Pink or brown?
They're neither white and gold or black and blue. But in an optical puzzle akin to The Dress, colourful snails are causing scientists at the University of Nottingham to turn to technology to definitively decide whether some snails' shells are pink or brown. (2019-02-25)
Weyl goes chiral
Quasiparticles that behave like massless fermions, known as Weyl fermions, have been in recent years at the center of a string of exciting findings in condensed matter physics. (2019-02-11)
Computer simulators show how to reduce damage to lungs of children in intensive care
Changing the ventilation settings for children on life support can reduce the risk of damage to their lungs, researchers at the University of Warwick and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia have found on computer simulated patients. (2019-02-20)
Balancing the gut
Researchers from the Cluster of Excellence 'Precision Medicine in Chronic Inflammation' in Kiel and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have uncovered a critical mechanism that controls immune reactions against microorganisms in the intestine. (2019-02-26)
NUS study finds that severe air pollution affects the productivity of workers
Economists from the National University of Singapore have completed an extensive study which reveals that exposure to air pollution over several weeks is not just unhealthy, it can also reduce employee productivity. (2019-01-03)
Sensing shakes
Every year earthquakes worldwide claim hundreds or even thousands of lives. (2019-03-10)
Salk team reveals clues into early development of autism spectrum disorder
Researchers at the Salk Institute compared stem cells created from individuals with ASD against stem cells created from those without ASD to uncover, for the first time, measurable differences in the patterns and speed of development in the ASD-derived cells. (2019-01-07)
Identifying artificial intelligence 'blind spots'
A novel model developed by MIT and Microsoft researchers identifies instances in which autonomous systems have 'learned' from training examples that don't match what's actually happening in the real world. (2019-01-24)
Palm oil not the only driver of forest loss in Indonesia
Large-scale agriculture, primarily for growing oil palms, remains a major cause of deforestation in Indonesia but its impact has diminished in recent years as other natural and human causes emerge, a Duke University study finds. (2019-02-01)
Choosy amphipods
Amphipods of the species Gammarus roeselii guard their chosen mates, often carrying them with them for days and defending them against potential rivals. (2019-02-07)
Cellular stress at the movies
For the first time, biological imaging experts have used a custom fluorescence microscope and a novel antibody tagging tool to watch living cells undergoing stress. (2019-01-25)
Sources and sinks
For the entire history of our species, humans have lived on a planet capped by a chunk of ice at each pole. (2019-03-14)
Seawater turns into freshwater through solar energy: A new low-cost technology
A study conducted at Politecnico di Torino and published by the journal Nature Sustainability promotes an innovative and low-cost technology to turn seawater into drinking water, thanks to the use of solar energy alone. (2019-01-07)
Your smartphone now knows if you smoke and may help you quit
A study from Gero longevity company shows that smoking cessation leads to rejuvenation that can be monitored by a mobile phone app (2019-01-23)
Scientists turn carbon emissions into usable energy
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a system that turn carbon emissions into usable energy. (2019-01-19)
WVU researchers find telemedicine may increase patient satisfaction with medical care
A recent study led by Albeir Mousa, a professor in the West Virginia University School of Medicine, suggests telemedicine may improve patients' satisfaction with their postoperative care as well as their quality of life. (2019-01-02)
New materials could 'drive wound healing' by harnessing natural healing methods
Imperial researchers have developed new bioinspired material that interacts with surrounding tissues to promote healing. (2019-01-07)
Long-term trauma outcomes heavily impacted by gender and education level
Researchers find sociodemographic factors more predictive of worse outcomes than injury severity. (2019-01-03)
New treatment offers potentially promising results for the possibility of slowing, stopping, or even reversing Parkinson's disease
A pioneering clinical trials program that delivered an experimental treatment directly to the brain offers hope that it may be possible to restore the cells damaged in Parkinson's disease. (2019-02-27)
Study: Much of the surface ocean will shift in color by end of 21st century
Climate change is causing significant changes to phytoplankton in the world's oceans, and a new MIT study finds that over the coming decades these changes will affect the ocean's color, intensifying its blue regions and its green ones. (2019-02-04)
The future of minority health and health disparities research is here
Thirty specific research strategies were identified across the three pillars that guided the science visioning: methods and measurement, etiology, and interventions. (2019-02-01)
A powerful catalyst for electrolysis of water that could help harness renewable energy
An international collaboration of Scientists at Dongguk University developed a novel nickel-based hydroxide compound that can be used as a powerful catalyst for the electrolysis of water. (2019-01-25)
UMN researchers describe need for health systems to improve care of gender non-binary patients
A perspective piece authored by UMN Medical School researchers and published in the New England Journal of Medicine uncovers significant healthcare disparities for individuals who identify as neither male nor female or may not identify as having a gender. (2019-01-07)
The human brain works backwards to retrieve memories
When we remember a past event, the human brain reconstructs that experience in reverse order, according to a new study at the University of Birmingham. (2019-01-14)
All too human
Professor Rony Paz of the Weizmann Institute of Science suggests that our brains are like modern washing machines -- evolved to have the latest sophisticated programming, but more vulnerable to breakdown and prone to develop costly disorders. (2019-01-22)
How does the brain learn by talking to itself?
One of the greatest challenges of systems neuroscience is to explain how synaptic connections change to support adaptive behaviours. (2019-01-02)
ESC press release: Loss of muscle and weight associated with disability after stroke
Loss of muscle and body weight is associated with disability after stroke, reports a study presented today at Heart & Stroke 2019, a meeting of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Stroke, and published in the Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle. (2019-01-25)
Can a video game-based 'digital medicine' help children with autism and co-occurring ADHD?
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) evaluated a digital medicine tool designed as an investigational treatment for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and co-occurring attention/deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (2019-01-03)
Squid could provide an eco-friendly alternative to plastics
The remarkable properties of a recently-discovered squid protein could revolutionize materials in a way that would be unattainable with conventional plastic. (2019-02-21)
Crocodile face off
Despite often being portrayed as creatures that have remained virtually unchanged for millions of years, a new Harvard study shows crocodiles have repeatedly altered their developmental patterns, leading to much of the diversity found in modern, living crocodiles. (2019-02-20)

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Don't Fear Math
Why do many of us hate, even fear math? Why are we convinced we're bad at it? This hour, TED speakers explore the myths we tell ourselves and how changing our approach can unlock the beauty of math. Guests include budgeting specialist Phylecia Jones, mathematician and educator Dan Finkel, math teacher Eddie Woo, educator Masha Gershman, and radio personality and eternal math nerd Adam Spencer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#517 Life in Plastic, Not Fantastic
Our modern lives run on plastic. It's in the computers and phones we use. It's in our clothing, it wraps our food. It surrounds us every day, and when we throw it out, it's devastating for the environment. This week we air a live show we recorded at the 2019 Advancement of Science meeting in Washington, D.C., where Bethany Brookshire sat down with three plastics researchers - Christina Simkanin, Chelsea Rochman, and Jennifer Provencher - and a live audience to discuss plastics in our oceans. Where they are, where they are going, and what they carry with them. Related links:...