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Science News Archive | Brightsurf | (2020)

Science news and current events archive from 2020

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Top Science Current Events and Science News from 2020


Moderate-to-high posttraumatic stress common after exposure to trauma, violence
Over 30 percent of injury survivors who are treated in hospital emergency departments will have moderate-to-severe symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point in the first year following the initial incident, new research led by the Yale School of Public Health finds. (2020-03-06)
Sphingotec's endothelial function biomarker bio-ADM® improves risk stratification of sepsis patients at ICUs
New study data show that monitoring blood levels of sphingotec's endothelial function biomarker bio-ADM® on top of guideline parameter lactate improves risk stratification of sepsis patients admitted to intensive care units. (2020-03-05)
Visceral fat delivers signal to the brain that hurts cognition
Excessive weight around our middle gives our brain's resident immune cells heavy exposure to a signal that turns them against us, setting in motion a crescendo of inflammation that damages cognition, scientists say. (2020-03-03)
Polymers get caught up in love-hate chemistry of oil and water
Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee achieved a rare look at the inner workings of polymer self-assembly at an oil-water interface to advance materials for neuromorphic computing and bio-inspired technologies. (2020-02-27)
Solar technology breakthrough at the University of Queensland
UQ researchers have set a world record for the conversion of solar energy to electricity via the use of tiny nanoparticles called 'quantum dots'. (2020-02-18)
When less is more: Designer slits make glasslike materials much stronger
By removing material via specially designed cuts in a glasslike material, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, and the University of Pennsylvania in the US have changed the mechanical properties of the material. (2020-02-15)
Prebiotics help mice fight melanoma by activating anti-tumor immunity
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that two prebiotics, mucin and inulin, slowed the growth of melanoma in mice by boosting the immune system's ability to fight cancer. (2020-02-11)
Machine learning technique speeds up crystal structure determination
A computer-based method could make it less labor-intensive to determine the crystal structures of various materials and molecules, including alloys, proteins and pharmaceuticals. (2020-01-30)
Don't wait to get concussion care; early treatment may mean faster recovery
Early clinical treatment may significantly reduce recovery time following a concussion, according to new research led by the University of Pittsburgh Sports Medicine Concussion Program. (2020-01-06)
Veterans report health as their No. 1 worry
Health concerns are the most important readjustment challenge facing veterans in the first year after they leave military service. (2020-01-02)
Exotic properties of helium-methane compounds inside giant planets
Both helium and methane are major components of icy giant planets, however, whether they can react with each other is still an open question. (2020-05-25)
Solving the space junk problem
Aging satellites and space debris crowd low-Earth orbit, and launching new satellites adds to the collision risk. (2020-05-25)
Chemical recycling makes useful product from waste bioplastic
A faster, more efficient way of recycling plant-based 'bioplastics' has been developed by a team of scientists at the universities of Birmingham and Bath. (2020-05-20)
NASA-NOAA satellite catches post-tropical storm Arthur's end
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the western North Atlantic Ocean and provided forecasters with a visible image of Post Tropical Storm Arthur. (2020-05-20)
Replacing time spent sitting with sleep or light activity may improve your mood
New research, published by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, found that substituting prolonged sedentary time with sleep was associated with lower stress, better mood and lower body mass index (BMI), and substituting light physical activity was associated with improved mood and lower BMI across the next year. (2020-05-20)
Animal study shows human brain cells repair damage in multiple sclerosis
A new study shows that when specific human brain cells are transplanted into animal models of multiple sclerosis and other white matter diseases, the cells repair damage and restore function. (2020-05-19)
Six-month follow-up appropriate for BI-RADS 3 findings on mammography
Women with mammographically detected breast lesions that are probably benign should have follow-up surveillance imaging at six months due to the small but not insignificant risk that the lesions are malignant, according to a new study. (2020-05-19)
Cancer researchers locate drivers of tumor resistance
How do tumors change their behavior and resist anticancer therapies? (2020-05-18)
Chinese to rise as a global language
With the continuing rise of China as a global economic and trading power, there is no barrier to prevent Chinese from becoming a global language like English, according to Flinders University academic Dr Jeffrey Gil. (2020-05-17)
Virus protein discovery reveals new plant-animal class of cell division disruptors
Recently, researchers from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology (IGDB) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences discovered a plant viral protein named 17K that disrupts host cell division to promote its own propagation in infected tissues. (2020-05-13)
Pitt researchers create durable, washable textile coating that can repel viruses
Research from the LAMP Lab at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering has created a textile coating that can not only repel liquids like blood and saliva but can also prevent viruses from adhering to the surface. (2020-05-13)
Expandable foam for 3D printing large objects (video)
It's a frustrating limitation of 3D printing: Printed objects must be smaller than the machine making them. (2020-05-13)
Artificial intelligence helps researchers up-cycle waste carbon
Researchers at University of Toronto Engineering and Carnegie Mellon University are using artificial intelligence (AI) to accelerate progress in transforming waste carbon into a commercially valuable product with record efficiency. (2020-05-13)
A combo of fasting plus vitamin C is effective for hard-to-treat cancers, study shows
Researchers from USC and IFOM Cancer Institute found a fasting-mimicking diet could be more effective at treating some types of cancer when combined with vitamin C. (2020-05-12)
Dogs can detect traces of gasoline down to one billionth of a teaspoon
Trained dogs can detect fire accelerants such as gasoline in quantities as small as one billionth of a teaspoon, according to new research by University of Alberta chemists. (2020-05-12)
Penn State and NAGP identify and reconstitute two lost Holstein lines
more than 99 percent of Holstein bulls born using artificial insemination in the last decade trace their male lineage to just two bulls born in the 1960s. (2020-05-11)
Predictive models could provide more accurate detection of early-stage Parkinson's disease
neuroscientists at York University have found five different models that use these types of non-motor clinical as well as biological variables to more accurately predict early-stage Parkinson's disease. (2020-05-11)
Microalgae food for honey bees
A microscopic algae ('microalgae') could provide a complete and sustainably sourced supplemental diet to boost the robustness of managed honey bees, according to research just published by Agricultural Research Service scientists in the journal Apidologie. (2020-05-11)
First simulation of a full-sized mitochondrial membrane
Scientists from the University of Groningen have developed a method that combines different resolution levels in a computer simulation of biological membranes. (2020-05-08)
What are your chances of having a second IVF baby after fertility treatment for the first?
As the restrictions on fertility clinics start to be lifted and IVF treatment resumes, research published in Human Reproduction journal offers reassuring news to women who have had to delay their treatment for a second IVF baby because of the coronavirus. (2020-05-07)
New evidence that higher caffeine and urate levels are protective against Parkinson's
Two purines, caffeine and urate, have been associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) in multiple study groups and populations. (2020-05-05)
Solar and wind energy sites mapped globally for the first time
Researchers at the University of Southampton have mapped the global locations of major renewable energy sites, providing a valuable resource to help assess their potential environmental impact. (2020-05-04)
To make an atom-sized machine, you need a quantum mechanic
Here's a new chapter in the story of the miniaturisation of machines: researchers in a laboratory in Singapore have shown that a single atom can function as either an engine or a fridge. (2020-05-04)
Aphantasia clears the way for a scientific career path
People with low or no visual imagery are more likely to work in scientific and mathematical industries than creative sectors, according to new research. (2020-05-03)
Ending the daily work commute may not cut energy usage as much as one might hope
A mass move to working-from-home accelerated by the Coronavirus pandemic might not be as beneficial to the planet as many hope, according to a new study by the Centre for Research into Energy Demand Solutions (CREDS). (2020-04-30)
Certain diabetes drugs may protect against serious kidney problems
Use of sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors to treat type 2 diabetes may help to lower the risk of serious kidney problems, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-04-29)
A milder hair dye based on synthetic melanin
With the coronavirus pandemic temporarily shuttering hair salons, many clients are appreciating, and missing, the ability of hair dye to cover up grays or touch up roots. (2020-04-29)
Researchers tackle a new opportunity to develop high-energy batteries
In recent years, lithium-ion batteries have become better at supplying energy to Soldiers in the field, but the current generation of batteries never reaches its highest energy potential. (2020-04-28)
Soil in wounds can help stem deadly bleeding
New UBC research shows for the first time that soil silicates--the most abundant material on the Earth's crust--play a key role in blood clotting. (2020-04-27)
Honey bees could help monitor fertility loss in insects due to climate change
New research from the University of British Columbia and North Carolina State University could help scientists track how climate change is impacting the birds and the bees... of honey bees. (2020-04-27)
They remember: Communities of microbes found to have working memory
Biologists studying communities of bacteria have discovered that these so-called simple organisms feature a robust capacity for memory. (2020-04-27)
FSU researchers discover new structure for promising class of materials
Florida State researchers have published a new study in the journal Science Advances that explains how they created a hollow nanostructure for metal halide perovskites that would allow the material to emit a highly efficient blue light. (2020-04-24)
Two steps closer to flexible, powerful, fast bioelectronic devices
Led by Biomedical Engineering Professor Dion Khodagholy, researchers have designed biocompatible ion-driven soft transistors that can perform real-time neurologically relevant computation and a mixed-conducting particulate composite that allows creation of electronic components out of a single material. (2020-04-24)
Water molecules dance in three
An international team of scientists has been able to shed new light on the properties of water at the molecular level. (2020-04-24)
Warming climate undoes decades of knowledge of marine protected areas
A new study highlights that tropical coral reef marine reserves can offer little defence in the face of climate change impacts. (2020-04-24)
Everything is not fine: Kids can tell when parents suppress their stress
New research finds that parents suppressing feelings of stress around their kids can actually transmit those feelings to the children. (2020-04-23)
New heart attack testing protocol expedites treatment in ER
A new protocol using highly sensitive blood tests to determine whether someone is having a heart attack. (2020-04-22)
DNA may not be life's instruction book -- just a jumbled list of ingredients
The common view of heredity is that all information passed down from one generation to the next is stored in an organism's DNA. (2020-04-22)
Specialized nerve cells increase the appetite for high-fat foods
Fat activates nociceptin neurons in the hypothalamus of mice. (2020-04-22)
Reference genes are identified that are useful for genetic improvement in wheat
University of Cordoba Professor Miguel Aguilar participated in a published article on reference genes in the study of wheat meiosis, the process in which reproductive cells are generated (2020-04-21)

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