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Science News Archive | Brightsurf | (2020)

Science news and current events archive from 2020

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Top Science Current Events and Science News from 2020


Moderate-to-high posttraumatic stress common after exposure to trauma, violence
Over 30 percent of injury survivors who are treated in hospital emergency departments will have moderate-to-severe symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point in the first year following the initial incident, new research led by the Yale School of Public Health finds. (2020-03-06)
Sphingotec's endothelial function biomarker bio-ADM® improves risk stratification of sepsis patients at ICUs
New study data show that monitoring blood levels of sphingotec's endothelial function biomarker bio-ADM® on top of guideline parameter lactate improves risk stratification of sepsis patients admitted to intensive care units. (2020-03-05)
Visceral fat delivers signal to the brain that hurts cognition
Excessive weight around our middle gives our brain's resident immune cells heavy exposure to a signal that turns them against us, setting in motion a crescendo of inflammation that damages cognition, scientists say. (2020-03-03)
Polymers get caught up in love-hate chemistry of oil and water
Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee achieved a rare look at the inner workings of polymer self-assembly at an oil-water interface to advance materials for neuromorphic computing and bio-inspired technologies. (2020-02-27)
Solar technology breakthrough at the University of Queensland
UQ researchers have set a world record for the conversion of solar energy to electricity via the use of tiny nanoparticles called 'quantum dots'. (2020-02-18)
When less is more: Designer slits make glasslike materials much stronger
By removing material via specially designed cuts in a glasslike material, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, and the University of Pennsylvania in the US have changed the mechanical properties of the material. (2020-02-15)
Prebiotics help mice fight melanoma by activating anti-tumor immunity
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that two prebiotics, mucin and inulin, slowed the growth of melanoma in mice by boosting the immune system's ability to fight cancer. (2020-02-11)
Machine learning technique speeds up crystal structure determination
A computer-based method could make it less labor-intensive to determine the crystal structures of various materials and molecules, including alloys, proteins and pharmaceuticals. (2020-01-30)
Don't wait to get concussion care; early treatment may mean faster recovery
Early clinical treatment may significantly reduce recovery time following a concussion, according to new research led by the University of Pittsburgh Sports Medicine Concussion Program. (2020-01-06)
Veterans report health as their No. 1 worry
Health concerns are the most important readjustment challenge facing veterans in the first year after they leave military service. (2020-01-02)
Algorithm created by deep learning finds potential therapeutic targets throughout genome
A team of researchers have developed an algorithm through machine learning that helps predict sites of DNA methylation - a process that can change the activity of DNA without changing its overall structure - and could identify disease-causing mechanisms that would otherwise be missed by conventional screening methods. (2020-08-06)
Career-readiness through cross-disciplinary project-based learning
Faculty members at Washington State University Everett recently developed and implemented an interdisciplinary project-based learning approach to provide students with real-world professional experience. (2020-08-05)
Journalists' Twitter use shows them talking within smaller bubbles
Journalists in Washington, D.C., have long been accused of living in a ''Beltway bubble.'' Their interactions on Twitter, however, show them congregating in even smaller ''microbubbles,'' says a recent study. (2020-08-05)
NASA data helps uncover our solar system's shape
Scientists have developed a new prediction of the shape of the bubble surrounding our solar system using a model developed with data from NASA missions. (2020-08-05)
Fabrication advance: Spray-on clear coatings for cheaper smart windows
Researchers have developed a spray-on method for making conductive clear coatings, or transparent electrodes. (2020-08-05)
HIIT programs show benefits for those with Down syndrome
Incorporating high-intensity interval training, or HIIT, into exercise programs for individuals with Down syndrome may help achieve critical health outcomes in a more time-efficient manner, according to new researcher. (2020-08-04)
Tradeoff between the eyes and nose helps flies find their niche
The size of a fly's eyes and nose reflect both its behaviour during mating and its habitat preferences, according to a new study published today in eLife. (2020-08-04)
COVID-19 study confirms low transmission in educational settings
New research from University of Sydney finds COVID-19 transmission rates in NSW schools and early childcare education and care settings were minimal, particularly between children and from children to adults. (2020-08-03)
Hydrogel paves way for biomedical breakthrough
Dubbed the ''invisibility cloak'', engineers at the University of Sydney have developed a hydrogel that allows implants and transplants to better and more safetly interact with surrounding tissue. (2020-08-03)
Child sleep problems associated with impaired academic and psychosocial functioning
A new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has found that sleep disturbances at any age are associated with diminished well-being by the time the children are 10 or 11 years old. (2020-08-03)
A blood test could predict who benefits from immunotherapy
A test which detects changing levels of tumour fragments in the blood may be an easy, non-invasive and quick way to predict who will benefit from immunotherapy, a treatment option for advanced cancers. (2020-08-03)
Copper-catalyzed enantioselective trifluoromethylation of benzylic radicals developed
Scientists from the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have developed the first copper-catalyzed enantioselective trifluoromethylation of benzylic radicals via a copper-catalyzed radical relay strategy. (2020-07-30)
Investigational breast cancer vaccine plus immune therapy work well in tandem
A vaccine for HER2-positive breast cancers that is being tested in a clinical trial at Duke Cancer Institute is part of an effective, two-drug strategy for enlisting the immune system to fight tumors, according to a Duke-led study in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (2020-07-30)
Smaller habitats worse than expected for biodiversity
Biodiversity's ongoing global decline has prompted policies to protect and restore habitats to minimize animal and plant extinctions. (2020-07-29)
A practicable and reliable therapeutic strategy to treat SARS-CoV-2 infection
In a new study in Cell Discovery, Chen-Yu Zhang's group at Nanjing University and two other groups from Wuhan Institute of Virology and the Second Hospital of Nanjing present a novel finding that absorbed miRNA MIR2911 in honeysuckle decoction (HD) can directly target SARS-CoV-2 genes and inhibit viral replication. (2020-07-28)
Safe work protocols can increase the likelihood the business will fail
There are conflicting predictions on the relationship between worker safety and organization survival. (2020-07-27)
Potential therapeutic effects of dipyridamole in the severely ill patients with COVID-19
Effective antivirals with safe clinical profile are urgently needed to improve the overall COVID-19 prognosis. (2020-07-26)
Mammal cells could struggle to fight space germs
The immune systems of mammals - including humans - might struggle to detect and respond to germs from other planets, new research suggests. (2020-07-23)
Scientists present pre- and postfusion cryo-em structures of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein
Scientists report two new cryo-EM structures representing the pre- and postfusion conformations of the full-length SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) protein, an essential viral component responsible for host cell entry and the spread of infection. (2020-07-21)
Mutant zebrafish reveals a turning point in spine's evolution
A chance mutation that led to spinal defects in a zebrafish has opened a little window into our own fishy past. (2020-07-20)
Bouncing bubbles shake up emulsion studies
Collisions of tiny air bubbles with water surfaces can reveal fundamental characteristics of foamy mixtures. (2020-07-20)
Turmeric could have antiviral properties
Curcumin, a natural compound found in the spice turmeric, could help eliminate certain viruses, research has found. (2020-07-17)
Partnerships with health systems can provide support to nursing homes during pandemic
Meaningful partnerships between hospitals and nursing facilities can support better quality of care for people who live in the facilities. (2020-07-13)
Single-cell RNA sequencing outlines the immune landscape of severe COVID-19
A new single-cell RNA sequencing analysis of more than 59,000 cells from three different patient cohorts provides a detailed look at patients' immune responses to severe cases of COVID-19. (2020-07-10)
Global COVID-19 registry finds strokes associated with COVID-19 are more severe, have worse outcomes and higher mortality
Patients with COVID-19 who have an acute ischemic stroke (AIS) experience more severe strokes, have worse functional outcomes and are more likely to die of stroke than AIS patients who do not have COVID-19. (2020-07-10)
Care for cats? So did people along the Silk Road more than 1,000 years ago
Common domestic cats, as we know them today, might have accompanied Kazakh pastoralists as pets more than 1,000 years ago. (2020-07-09)
Blood-based biomarker can detect, predict severity of traumatic brain injury
A study from the National Institutes of Health confirms that neurofilament light chain as a blood biomarker can detect brain injury and predict recovery in multiple groups, including professional hockey players with acute or chronic concussions and clinic-based patients with mild, moderate, or severe traumatic brain injury. (2020-07-08)
NASA analyzes Tropical Cyclone Damien's water vapor concentration
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Cristina in the Eastern Pacific Ocean on July 8, it gathered water vapor data that provided information about the intensity of the storm. (2020-07-08)
Soil studies can be helpful for border control
Underground tunnels have been used by warriors and smugglers for thousands of years to infiltrate battlegrounds and cross borders. (2020-07-08)
Does early access to pension funds improve health?
In a recent study from Singapore, early access to pension wealth was associated with improved health status. (2020-07-08)
Milk lipids follow the evolution of mammals
Skoltech scientists conducted a study of milk lipids and described the unique features of human breast milk as compared to bovids, pigs, and closely related primates. (2020-07-07)
Electrically focus-tuneable ultrathin lens for high-resolution square subpixels
In accordance to rising demand of high-resolution, ultrathin lens device for display panels, the scientists from Korea, UK, and USA have invented an electrically focus-tunable, graphene-based ultrathin subpixel square lens device that demonstrates excellent focusing performance. (2020-07-06)
Crystal structure discovered almost 200 years ago could hold key to solar cell revolution
Solar energy researchers are shining their scientific spotlight on materials with a crystal structure discovered nearly two centuries ago. (2020-07-02)
Oncotarget: IQGAP1 control of centrosome function defines variants of breast cancer
The cover for issue 26 of Oncotarget features Figure 6, 'Mislocalization of IQGAP1-BRCA1 in human TNBC tumors phenocopies the dominant mutants and the TNBC cells,' by Osman, et al. and reported that IQGAP1 is a signaling scaffold implicated in TNBC, but its mechanism is unknown. (2020-06-30)
Artificial intelligence identifies, locates seizures in real-time
Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. (2020-06-29)
Stanford researchers reveal air pollution's connection to infant mortality
The study of sub-Saharan Africa finds that a relatively small increase in airborne particles significantly increase infant mortality rates. (2020-06-29)
Bleaching affects aquarium corals, too
A world-first study examines the temperature thresholds of Australian aquarium corals and finds they are at risk under climate change. (2020-06-29)
Report points to intergroup tensions from different interpretations of social distancing
Ambiguity over social distancing as lockdown eases over the coming months could lead to tensions between groups warn researchers. (2020-06-28)
International team of scientists warns of increasing threats posed by invasive species
URI Professor Laura Meyerson part of a team of researchers published in the journal Biological Reviews for a study on proliferation of alien invasive species and the dangers they pose. (2020-06-26)
Pantera leo's family tree takes shape
Once upon a time, lions were the world's most widespread mammals. (2020-06-26)

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Uncounted
First things first: our very own Latif Nasser has an exciting new show on Netflix. He talks to Jad about the hidden forces of the world that connect us all. Then, with an eye on the upcoming election, we take a look back: at two pieces from More Perfect Season 3 about Constitutional amendments that determine who gets to vote. Former Radiolab producer Julia Longoria takes us to Washington, D.C. The capital is at the heart of our democracy, but it's not a state, and it wasn't until the 23rd Amendment that its people got the right to vote for president. But that still left DC without full representation in Congress; D.C. sends a "non-voting delegate" to the House. Julia profiles that delegate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, and her unique approach to fighting for power in a virtually powerless role. Second, Radiolab producer Sarah Qari looks at a current fight to lower the US voting age to 16 that harkens back to the fight for the 26th Amendment in the 1960s. Eighteen-year-olds at the time argued that if they were old enough to be drafted to fight in the War, they were old enough to have a voice in our democracy. But what about today, when even younger Americans are finding themselves at the center of national political debates? Does it mean we should lower the voting age even further? This episode was reported and produced by Julia Longoria and Sarah Qari. Check out Latif Nasser's new Netflix show Connected here. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.