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Science News Archive | Brightsurf | (2020)

Science news and current events archive from 2020

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Top Science Current Events and Science News from 2020


Moderate-to-high posttraumatic stress common after exposure to trauma, violence
Over 30 percent of injury survivors who are treated in hospital emergency departments will have moderate-to-severe symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point in the first year following the initial incident, new research led by the Yale School of Public Health finds. (2020-03-06)
Sphingotec's endothelial function biomarker bio-ADM® improves risk stratification of sepsis patients at ICUs
New study data show that monitoring blood levels of sphingotec's endothelial function biomarker bio-ADM® on top of guideline parameter lactate improves risk stratification of sepsis patients admitted to intensive care units. (2020-03-05)
Visceral fat delivers signal to the brain that hurts cognition
Excessive weight around our middle gives our brain's resident immune cells heavy exposure to a signal that turns them against us, setting in motion a crescendo of inflammation that damages cognition, scientists say. (2020-03-03)
Polymers get caught up in love-hate chemistry of oil and water
Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee achieved a rare look at the inner workings of polymer self-assembly at an oil-water interface to advance materials for neuromorphic computing and bio-inspired technologies. (2020-02-27)
Solar technology breakthrough at the University of Queensland
UQ researchers have set a world record for the conversion of solar energy to electricity via the use of tiny nanoparticles called 'quantum dots'. (2020-02-18)
When less is more: Designer slits make glasslike materials much stronger
By removing material via specially designed cuts in a glasslike material, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, and the University of Pennsylvania in the US have changed the mechanical properties of the material. (2020-02-15)
Prebiotics help mice fight melanoma by activating anti-tumor immunity
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that two prebiotics, mucin and inulin, slowed the growth of melanoma in mice by boosting the immune system's ability to fight cancer. (2020-02-11)
Machine learning technique speeds up crystal structure determination
A computer-based method could make it less labor-intensive to determine the crystal structures of various materials and molecules, including alloys, proteins and pharmaceuticals. (2020-01-30)
Don't wait to get concussion care; early treatment may mean faster recovery
Early clinical treatment may significantly reduce recovery time following a concussion, according to new research led by the University of Pittsburgh Sports Medicine Concussion Program. (2020-01-06)
Veterans report health as their No. 1 worry
Health concerns are the most important readjustment challenge facing veterans in the first year after they leave military service. (2020-01-02)
Researchers map mechanism to explain role of gene mutations in kidney disease
Researchers from the Center for Precision Disease Modeling at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have uncovered a mechanism that appears to explain how certain genetic mutations give rise to a rare genetic kidney disorder called nephrotic syndrome. (2020-04-03)
'Tequila' powered biofuels more efficient than corn or sugar
Agave tequilana, the plant native to Mexico used to make tequila, could prove to be an efficient alternative to sugarcane and corn to make biofuels in semi-arid regions. (2020-03-31)
A 'cardiac patch with bioink' developed to repair heart
A joint research team of POSTECH, The Catholic University, and City University of Hong Kong developed an 'in vivo priming' with heart-derived bioink. (2020-03-30)
Artificial intelligence can speed up the detection of stroke
Human emotion system laboratory team at the University of Turku and Turku PET Centre, Finland, introduces a fully automated method for acute ischemic lesion segmentation on brain MRIs and shows how artificial intelligence can reduce the work load of radiologists. (2020-03-30)
New in vivo priming strategy to train stem cells can enhance cardiac repair effectiveness
A stem cell biologist from City University of Hong Kong (CityU), together with his collaborators, has developed a novel strategy, called in vivo priming, to 'train' the stem cells to stay strong after implantation to the damaged heart via the 3D-printed bandage-like patch. (2020-03-27)
Jumping genes help make neurons in a dish
The conversion of skin cells into brain cells relies on proper insertion of L1 elements. (2020-03-26)
Weedy rice is unintended legacy of Green Revolution
Weedy rice is a feral form of rice that infests paddies worldwide and aggressively outcompetes cultivated varieties. (2020-03-25)
Study challenges common view of oxygen scarcity on Earth 2 billion years ago
Geologists at University of Tartu and University of Alberta in collaboration with an international research team found evidence for elevated oxygen levels 2 billion years ago, in contradiction to previously accepted models that predict low oxygen at that time. (2020-03-24)
World's first ultrasound biosensor created in Australia
Most implantable monitors for drug levels and biomarkers invented so far rely on high tech and expensive detectors such as CT scans or MRI. (2020-03-23)
Study sheds light on fatty acid's role in 'chemobrain' and multiple sclerosis
Medical experts have always known myelin, the protective coating of nerve cells, to be metabolically inert. (2020-03-23)
Among wild mammals too, females live longer
In all human populations, average lifespans are longer for women than for men. (2020-03-23)
Knowledge and perceptions of COVID-19 among the general public in the US, UK
Knowledge and perceptions of coronavirus disease 2019 among the general public in the United States and the United Kingdom: A cross-sectional online survey (2020-03-20)
New mechanism of optical gain in two-dimensional material requires only extremely low input power
Optical gain is a prerequisite for signal amplification in an optical amplifier or laser. (2020-03-19)
Improving success of giraffe translocations
In two new studies, an international team of researchers identifies the ideal composition of a group of giraffes to be translocated for conservation purposes and provides guidelines for all aspects of the translocation process. (2020-03-19)
The strange orbits of 'Tatooine' planetary disks
Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have found striking orbital geometries in protoplanetary disks around binary stars. (2020-03-19)
Open sesame: Micro RNAs regulate plant pores
Environmental cues prompt small RNA segments to regulate the development and distribution of tiny pores involved in photosynthesis in plants. (2020-03-19)
Trauma relapse in a novel context may be preventable
Korea Brain Research Institute (KBRI, President: Pann-Ghill Suh) announced on February 10 that its research team led by Dr. (2020-03-18)
Step it up: Higher daily step counts linked with lower blood pressure
The smart watches seen on the wrists of roughly 1 in 5 Americans could be more than just a fun gimmick but a potentially useful research tool to track habitual physical activity levels. (2020-03-19)
Ancient fish fossil reveals evolutionary origin of the human hand
An ancient Elpistostege fish fossil found in Miguasha, Canada, has revealed new insights into how the human hand evolved from fish fins. (2020-03-18)
Researchers in Singapore find common therapeutic vulnerability for a genetically diverse and deadly
Scientists and clinicians from Duke-NUS Medical School, the Agency for Science, Technology and Research's (A*STAR's) Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS), and the Singapore General Hospital (SGH), have devised a novel drug combination that could treat a particularly deadly form of leukaemia, known as blast crisis (BC) chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). (2020-03-18)
To reap heart benefits of a plant-based diet, avoid junk food
A new study being presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC) suggests that people following a plant-based diet who frequently consumed less-healthful foods like sweets, refined grains and juice showed no heart health benefit compared with those who did not eat a plant-based diet. (2020-03-18)
Natural solutions to the climate crisis? One-quarter is all down to Earth...
A recent study led by scientists from The Nature Conservancy alongside Conservation International, Woods Hole Research Centre, University of Aberdeen, Yale University and the Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences (KIB/CAS), has provided a timely reminder in this critical 'super year' for nature not to neglect the power of soils and the many benefits these ecosystems can deliver for climate, wildlife and agriculture. (2020-03-17)
Inflammation in the brain linked to several forms of dementia
Inflammation in the brain may be more widely implicated in dementias than was previously thought, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. (2020-03-16)
Scientists optimize prime editing for rice and wheat
Recently, a research team led by Prof. GAO Caixia of the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the optimization of a prime editing system (PPE system) for creating desired point mutations, insertions and deletions in two major cereal crops, namely, rice and wheat. (2020-03-16)
A more balanced protein intake can reduce age-related muscle loss
Eating more protein at breakfast or lunchtime could help older people maintain muscle mass with advancing age -- but most people eat proteins fairly unevenly throughout the day, new research at the University of Birmingham has found. (2020-03-16)
Parkinson's disease linked to gene targeted by blue-green algae toxin
Scientists have discovered a possible link between Parkinson's disease and a gene impacted by a neurotoxin found in blue-green algae. (2020-03-15)
New planting guidelines could boost edamame profits
Edamame may be a niche crop in the United States, but growers and processors still need the best possible information to make sound management decisions. (2020-03-13)
Scientists identify new target for Parkinson's therapies
A master control region of a protein linked to Parkinson's disease has been identified for the first time. (2020-03-09)
The complex biology behind your love (or hatred) of coffee
Why do some people feel like they need three cups of coffee just to get through the day when others are happy with only one? (2020-03-06)
Artificial Intelligence to improve the precision of mammograms
The Artificial Intelligence techniques, used in combination with evaluations by expert radiologists, improve the precision in the detection of cancer through mammograms. (2020-03-05)
Deep-sea fish community structure strongly affected by oxygen and temperature
In a new study, researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) took advantage of the natural oceanographic gradient in the Gulf of California to study the effects of variable oxygen levels and temperatures on demersal fish communities. (2020-03-05)
Mayo Clinic researchers clarify how cells defend themselves from viruses
A protein known to help cells defend against infection also regulates the form and function of mitochondria, according to a new paper in Nature Communications. (2020-03-03)
The case for economics -- by the numbers
In recent years, criticism has been levelled at economics for being insular and unconcerned about real-world problems. (2020-03-03)
How a new quantum approach can develop faster algorithms to deduce complex networks
Complex networks are ubiquitous in the real world, from artificial to purely natural ones, and they exhibit very similar geometric properties. (2020-03-03)
New lithium batteries from used cell phones
Research from the University of Cordoba (Spain) and San Luis University (Argentina) was able to reuse graphite from cell phones to manufacture environmentally friendly batteries. (2020-03-03)
To predict an epidemic, evolution can't be ignored
Whether it's coronavirus or misinformation, scientists can use mathematical models to predict how something will spread across populations. (2020-03-02)
Re-thinking 'tipping points' in ecosystems and beyond
Abrupt environmental changes, known as regime shifts, are the subject of new research in which shows how small environmental changes trigger slow evolutionary processes that eventually precipitate collapse. (2020-03-02)
Antarctic ice walls protect the climate
Inland Antarctic ice contains volumes of water that can raise global sea levels by several metres. (2020-02-27)
Antioxidant precursor molecule could improve brain function in patients with MS
The naturally occurring molecule N-acetylcysteine (NAC) shows benefit in a clinical trial for multiple sclerosis. (2020-02-26)
Nanosize device 'uncloaks' cancer cells in mice and reveals them to the immune system
Scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have designed and successfully tested an experimental, super small package able to deliver molecular signals that tag implanted human cancer cells in mice and make them visible for destruction by the animals' immune systems. (2020-02-26)

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