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Science News Archive | Brightsurf | (April 2020)

Science news and current events archive from April, 2020.

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Week 14
Wednesday April 1, 2020 (88)
Thursday April 2, 2020 (86)
Friday April 3, 2020 (51)
Sunday April 5, 2020 (2)

Week 15
Monday April 6, 2020 (109)
Tuesday April 7, 2020 (77)
Wednesday April 8, 2020 (118)
Thursday April 9, 2020 (86)
Friday April 10, 2020 (36)
Saturday April 11, 2020 (5)

Week 16
Monday April 13, 2020 (77)
Tuesday April 14, 2020 (88)
Wednesday April 15, 2020 (108)
Thursday April 16, 2020 (108)
Friday April 17, 2020 (60)
Sunday April 19, 2020 (8)

Week 17
Monday April 20, 2020 (110)
Tuesday April 21, 2020 (94)
Wednesday April 22, 2020 (111)
Thursday April 23, 2020 (110)
Friday April 24, 2020 (60)
Saturday April 25, 2020 (4)
Sunday April 26, 2020 (2)

Week 18
Monday April 27, 2020 (126)
Tuesday April 28, 2020 (101)
Wednesday April 29, 2020 (112)
Thursday April 30, 2020 (113)


Top Science Current Events and Science News from April 2020



Researchers map mechanism to explain role of gene mutations in kidney disease
Researchers from the Center for Precision Disease Modeling at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have uncovered a mechanism that appears to explain how certain genetic mutations give rise to a rare genetic kidney disorder called nephrotic syndrome. (2020-04-03)
Autoimmunity may be rising in the United States
Autoimmunity, a condition in which the body's immune system reacts with components of its own cells, appears to be increasing in the United States, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health and their collaborators. (2020-04-08)
Origins of Earth's magnetic field remain a mystery
The existence of a magnetic field beyond 3.5 billion years ago is still up for debate. (2020-04-08)
NASA finds very heavy rainfall in major tropical cyclone Harold
On April 8, Tropical Cyclone Harold is a major hurricane, a Category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale, as it exits Fiji and heads toward the island of Tonga. (2020-04-08)
Time to encourage people to wear face masks as a precaution, say experts
It's time to encourage people to wear face masks as a precautionary measure on the grounds that we have little to lose and potentially something to gain, say experts in The BMJ today. (2020-04-09)
Long-living tropical trees play outsized role in carbon storage
A group of trees that grow fast, live long lives and reproduce slowly account for the bulk of the biomass -- and carbon storage -- in some tropical rainforests, a team of scientists says in a paper published this week in the journal Science. (2020-04-09)
Researchers reveal important genetic mechanism behind inflammatory bowel disease
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have pinpointed a genetic variation responsible for driving the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). (2020-04-09)
Mayo Clinic offer guidance on treating COVID-19 patients with signs of acute heart attack
Much remains unknown about COVID-19, but many studies already have indicated that people with cardiovascular disease are at greater risk of COVID-19. (2020-04-09)
Torquato research links elastodynamic and electromagnetic wave phenomena
Princeton's Salvatore Torquato, the Lewis Bernard Professor of Natural Sciences and director of the Complex Materials Theory Group, published research this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) linking wave phenomena that has never previously been linked. (2020-04-09)
New protocol identifies fascinating quantum states
Topological materials attract great interest and may provide the basis for a new era in materials development. (2020-04-10)
Under pressure: New bioinspired material can 'shapeshift' to external forces
Inspired by how human bone and colorful coral reefs adjust mineral deposits in response to their surrounding environments, Johns Hopkins researchers have created a self-adapting material that can change its stiffness in response to the applied force. (2020-04-17)
What did scientists learn from Deepwater Horizon?
In a review paper published in the journal Nature Reviews Earth & Environment, WHOI scientists review what they-- and their science colleagues from around the world--have learned from studying the spill over the past decade. (2020-04-20)
Virtual reality makes empathy easier
Virtual reality activates brain networks that increase your ability to identify with other people, according to new research published in eNeuro. (2020-04-20)
Reference genes are identified that are useful for genetic improvement in wheat
University of Cordoba Professor Miguel Aguilar participated in a published article on reference genes in the study of wheat meiosis, the process in which reproductive cells are generated (2020-04-21)
Specialized nerve cells increase the appetite for high-fat foods
Fat activates nociceptin neurons in the hypothalamus of mice. (2020-04-22)
DNA may not be life's instruction book -- just a jumbled list of ingredients
The common view of heredity is that all information passed down from one generation to the next is stored in an organism's DNA. (2020-04-22)
New heart attack testing protocol expedites treatment in ER
A new protocol using highly sensitive blood tests to determine whether someone is having a heart attack. (2020-04-22)
Everything is not fine: Kids can tell when parents suppress their stress
New research finds that parents suppressing feelings of stress around their kids can actually transmit those feelings to the children. (2020-04-23)
Warming climate undoes decades of knowledge of marine protected areas
A new study highlights that tropical coral reef marine reserves can offer little defence in the face of climate change impacts. (2020-04-24)
Water molecules dance in three
An international team of scientists has been able to shed new light on the properties of water at the molecular level. (2020-04-24)
Two steps closer to flexible, powerful, fast bioelectronic devices
Led by Biomedical Engineering Professor Dion Khodagholy, researchers have designed biocompatible ion-driven soft transistors that can perform real-time neurologically relevant computation and a mixed-conducting particulate composite that allows creation of electronic components out of a single material. (2020-04-24)
FSU researchers discover new structure for promising class of materials
Florida State researchers have published a new study in the journal Science Advances that explains how they created a hollow nanostructure for metal halide perovskites that would allow the material to emit a highly efficient blue light. (2020-04-24)
They remember: Communities of microbes found to have working memory
Biologists studying communities of bacteria have discovered that these so-called simple organisms feature a robust capacity for memory. (2020-04-27)
Honey bees could help monitor fertility loss in insects due to climate change
New research from the University of British Columbia and North Carolina State University could help scientists track how climate change is impacting the birds and the bees... of honey bees. (2020-04-27)
Soil in wounds can help stem deadly bleeding
New UBC research shows for the first time that soil silicates--the most abundant material on the Earth's crust--play a key role in blood clotting. (2020-04-27)
Researchers tackle a new opportunity to develop high-energy batteries
In recent years, lithium-ion batteries have become better at supplying energy to Soldiers in the field, but the current generation of batteries never reaches its highest energy potential. (2020-04-28)
A milder hair dye based on synthetic melanin
With the coronavirus pandemic temporarily shuttering hair salons, many clients are appreciating, and missing, the ability of hair dye to cover up grays or touch up roots. (2020-04-29)
Certain diabetes drugs may protect against serious kidney problems
Use of sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors to treat type 2 diabetes may help to lower the risk of serious kidney problems, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-04-29)
Ending the daily work commute may not cut energy usage as much as one might hope
A mass move to working-from-home accelerated by the Coronavirus pandemic might not be as beneficial to the planet as many hope, according to a new study by the Centre for Research into Energy Demand Solutions (CREDS). (2020-04-30)
Uncertain climate future could disrupt energy systems
An international team of scientists has published a new study proposing an optimization methodology for designing climate-resilient energy systems and to help ensure that communities will be able to meet future energy needs given weather and climate variability. (2020-04-01)
Climate disasters increase risks of armed conflicts: New evidence
The risk for violent clashes increases after weather extremes such as droughts or floods hit people in vulnerable countries, an international team of scientists finds. (2020-04-02)
New supramolecular copolymers driven by self-sorting of molecules
Researchers in Japan have succeeded in creating a new type of helicoidal supramolecular polymer. (2020-04-01)
Treatment relieves depression in 90% of participants in small study
A new form of magnetic brain stimulation rapidly relieved symptoms of severe depression in 90% of participants in a small study conducted by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2020-04-07)
Litter problem at England's protected coasts
Beaches in or near England's Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) have the same levels of litter as those in unprotected areas, new research shows. (2020-04-07)
Study demonstrates the need for immediate ICU care for severe COVID-19 pneumonia
Researchers have identified the most common clinical characteristics of 109 patients with COVID-19 related pneumonia who died in Wuhan, China in the early stages of the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new study published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. (2020-04-07)
Researchers assess bird flu virus subtypes in China
The avian influenza virus subtype H16N3 is currently detectable in many countries. (2020-04-08)
Newly emerged enterovirus-A71 C4 isolates may be more virulent than B5 in northern Vietnam
Researchers from Kanazawa University have found a new sublineage of enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) C4 subgenotype with two possible recombinant strains during the 2015-16 outbreak of hand-foot-and-mouth disease in Hanoi, northern Vietnam. (2020-04-09)
Astronomers measure wind speed on a brown dwarf
Using VLA and Spitzer observations, astronomers are able to determine wind speeds on a brown dwarf for the first time. (2020-04-09)
Seeing the light: Astronomers find new way novae light up the sky
An international team of researchers, in a paper published today in Nature Astronomy, highlights a new way novae light up the sky: this is shocks from explosions that create the novae that cause most of the their brightness. (2020-04-13)
Estuaries are warming at twice the rate of oceans and atmosphere
A 12-year study of 166 estuaries in south-east Australia shows that the waters of lakes, creeks, rivers and lagoons increased 2.16 degrees in temperature and increased acidity. (2020-04-14)
Breathing heavy wildfire smoke may increase risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Heavy wildfire smoke may raise the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. (2020-04-15)
Cochrane Rapid Review Update: Protective clothes and equipment for healthcare workers to prevent them catching coronavirus and other highly infectious diseases
The Cochrane Review, 'Personal protective equipment for preventing highly infectious diseases due to exposure to contaminated body fluids in healthcare staff,' has been updated as a rapid review in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-04-15)
Two novel viruses identified in Brazilian patients with suspected dengue
Species never before found in humans described in PLOS ONE belong to the genera Ambidensovirus and Chapparvovirus. (2020-04-17)
Study detects presence of disease-causing E. coli in recreational waters, including in bathing waters rated excellent under EU criteria
New research due to be presented at this year's European Congress on Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) has revealed the presence of disease-causing E. coli in recreational waters, including from beaches rated excellent under EU criteria. (2020-04-17)
North pole soon to be ice free in summer
The Arctic Ocean in summer will very likely be ice free before 2050, at least temporally. (2020-04-20)
Why relying on new technology won't save the planet
Why relying on new technology won't save the planet Overreliance on promises of new technology to solve climate change is enabling delay, say researchers from Lancaster University. (2020-04-20)
New study could lead to therapeutic interventions to treat cocaine addiction
A new study explains how cocaine modifies functions in the brain revealing a potential target for therapies aimed at treating cocaine addiction. (2020-04-22)
Views on guns and death penalty are linked to harsh treatment of immigrants
An online study that pulled equally from people who identify as Democrats or Republicans has found subtle new clues that underlie the dehumanization of immigrants. (2020-04-22)
Shrinking instead of growing: how shrews survive the winter
Even at sub-zero temperatures, common shrews do not need to increase their metabolism. (2020-04-28)
Mechanisms responsible for tissue growth
Publication in Cell: Researchers at the Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) uncover the mechanisms mediating postnatal tissue development. (2020-04-29)

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