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Science News Archive | Brightsurf | (August 2020)

Science news and current events archive from August, 2020.

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Week 31
Saturday August 1, 2020 (3)
Sunday August 2, 2020 (1)

Week 32
Monday August 3, 2020 (124)
Tuesday August 4, 2020 (120)
Wednesday August 5, 2020 (141)
Thursday August 6, 2020 (113)
Friday August 7, 2020 (71)
Saturday August 8, 2020 (3)
Sunday August 9, 2020 (3)

Week 33
Monday August 10, 2020 (124)
Tuesday August 11, 2020 (120)
Wednesday August 12, 2020 (122)
Thursday August 13, 2020 (116)
Friday August 14, 2020 (59)
Saturday August 15, 2020 (1)


Top Science Current Events and Science News from August 2020



A blood test could predict who benefits from immunotherapy
A test which detects changing levels of tumour fragments in the blood may be an easy, non-invasive and quick way to predict who will benefit from immunotherapy, a treatment option for advanced cancers. (2020-08-03)
Child sleep problems associated with impaired academic and psychosocial functioning
A new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has found that sleep disturbances at any age are associated with diminished well-being by the time the children are 10 or 11 years old. (2020-08-03)
Hydrogel paves way for biomedical breakthrough
Dubbed the ''invisibility cloak'', engineers at the University of Sydney have developed a hydrogel that allows implants and transplants to better and more safetly interact with surrounding tissue. (2020-08-03)
COVID-19 study confirms low transmission in educational settings
New research from University of Sydney finds COVID-19 transmission rates in NSW schools and early childcare education and care settings were minimal, particularly between children and from children to adults. (2020-08-03)
Tradeoff between the eyes and nose helps flies find their niche
The size of a fly's eyes and nose reflect both its behaviour during mating and its habitat preferences, according to a new study published today in eLife. (2020-08-04)
HIIT programs show benefits for those with Down syndrome
Incorporating high-intensity interval training, or HIIT, into exercise programs for individuals with Down syndrome may help achieve critical health outcomes in a more time-efficient manner, according to new researcher. (2020-08-04)
Fabrication advance: Spray-on clear coatings for cheaper smart windows
Researchers have developed a spray-on method for making conductive clear coatings, or transparent electrodes. (2020-08-05)
NASA data helps uncover our solar system's shape
Scientists have developed a new prediction of the shape of the bubble surrounding our solar system using a model developed with data from NASA missions. (2020-08-05)
Journalists' Twitter use shows them talking within smaller bubbles
Journalists in Washington, D.C., have long been accused of living in a ''Beltway bubble.'' Their interactions on Twitter, however, show them congregating in even smaller ''microbubbles,'' says a recent study. (2020-08-05)
Career-readiness through cross-disciplinary project-based learning
Faculty members at Washington State University Everett recently developed and implemented an interdisciplinary project-based learning approach to provide students with real-world professional experience. (2020-08-05)
Algorithm created by deep learning finds potential therapeutic targets throughout genome
A team of researchers have developed an algorithm through machine learning that helps predict sites of DNA methylation - a process that can change the activity of DNA without changing its overall structure - and could identify disease-causing mechanisms that would otherwise be missed by conventional screening methods. (2020-08-06)
Nepal lockdown halved health facility births and increased stillbirths and newborn deaths
COVID-19 response has resulted in major reductions in health facility births in Nepal and widened inequalities, with significantly increased institutional stillbirth and neonatal mortality, according to a new study in the Lancet Global Health. (2020-08-10)
Syphilis may have spread through Europe before Columbus
Columbus brought syphilis to Europe -- or did he? A recent study conducted at the University of Zurich now indicates that Europeans could already have been infected with this sexually transmitted disease before the 15th century. (2020-08-13)
Systemic racism has consequences for all life in cities
Social inequalities, specifically racism and classism, are impacting the biodiversity, evolutionary shifts and ecological health of plants and animals in our cities. (2020-08-13)
NASA finds wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Josephine
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of Tropical Storm Josephine east of the Lesser Antilles island chain. (2020-08-14)
Pregnant mother's immunity tied to behavioral, emotional challenges for kids with autism
Children with autism born to mothers who had immune conditions during their pregnancy are more likely to have behavioral and emotional problems, a UC Davis Health study has found. (2020-08-14)
Women skip medications more in the US than other countries
For patients, especially those living with chronic conditions, nonadherence to prescription medicines due to cost is a common problem. (2020-08-03)
Cell diversity in the embryo
Epigenetic factors control the development of an organism. (2020-08-04)
Real-time imaging can help prevent deadly dust explosions
Researchers at Purdue University have developed an image- and video-based application using OpenCV algorithms that detect explosible suspended dust concentration. (2020-08-05)
Practice patterns, responsiveness to common ocular complaints among ophthalmology centers during COVID-19
Practice patterns for common ocular complaints during the initial stage of the COVID-19 pandemic are reported in this observational study among comprehensive U.S. ophthalmology practices. (2020-08-05)
IKBFU researchers study the Curonian Spit plants adaptation mechanism
IKBFU Institute of Living Systems biology scientists study protective mechanisms of the Curonian Spit wild plants. (2020-08-05)
Delay in breast cancer operations appears non-life-threatening for early-stage disease
A new breast cancer study brings reassuring findings for women with early-stage breast cancer who were forced to delay their cancer operations because of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. (2020-08-06)
COVID-19 does not directly damage taste bud cells
A new study from the Regenerative Bioscience Center at the University of Georgia is the first to suggest that COVID-19 does not directly damage taste bud cells. (2020-08-10)
Jealous feelings can act as a tool to strengthen friendships
Jealousy can be important for maintaining friendships, which are crucial to physical and emotional health. (2020-08-11)
Simpler and faster microscopy system enabling broader biomedical applications
Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has demonstrated great values in biomedical research. (2020-08-12)
Dignity and respect go a long way in county jail, new research shows
A University of Wisconsin Oshkosh study indicates a little respect and decency can go a long way in improving some aspects of America's criminal justice system. (2020-08-12)
Sex, flies and videotape
Researchers discover key behaviour that triggers the transition from courtship to mating in fruit flies. (2020-08-13)
People power and satellites help scientists study climate impacts on Antarctic seals
A New Zealand-led international study of the crabeater seal population in Antarctica aims to understand environmental impacts on one of the southern-most mammals in the world. (2020-08-13)
Dolphin calf entangled in fishing line only lived two years following rescue
Researchers examined the outcome of an entangled bottlenose dolphin calf with monofilament fishing line wrapped tightly around its upper jaw. (2020-08-04)
NTU and A*STAR scientists develop new way to deliver more drugs through the skin
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) have showed that applying ''temporal pressure'' to the skin of mice can create a new way to deliver drugs. (2020-08-04)
Discovery shows promise for treating Huntington's Disease
Scientists at the lab of Professor Hilal Lashuel at EPFL have identified a new enzyme called ''TBK1'' who plays a central role in regulating the degradation and clearance of the huntingtin protein and introduces chemical modifications that block its aggregation. (2020-08-05)
Sustainable chemistry at the quantum level
University of Pittsburgh Associate Professor John A. Keith is using new quantum chemistry computing procedures to categorize hypothetical electrocatalysts that are ''too slow'' or ''too expensive'', far more thoroughly and quickly than was considered possible a few years ago. (2020-08-05)
Life at its limits
A new study led by James Bradley of the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ and Queen Mary University of London finds that microbes in the seabed survive on far less energy than has been shown ever before. (2020-08-05)
Tellurium makes the difference
The periodic system contains 118 chemical elements. However, only a few of them are of major importance in our daily lives. (2020-08-06)
Organocatalyst that controls radical reactions for complex and bulky compound synthesis
In catalytic reactions with organocatalysts, it is difficult to control radical reactions. (2020-08-11)
Primate voice boxes are evolving at rapid pace
Scientists have discovered that the larynx, or voice box, of primates is significantly larger relative to body size, has greater variation, and is under faster rates of evolution than in other mammals. (2020-08-11)
Scientists propose method for eliminating damaging heat bursts in fusion device
Researchers discover a technique for widening the windows of plasma current to enhance suppression of edge localized modes (ELMs) that can damage tokamak facilities. (2020-08-12)
Warming threat to tropical forests risks release of carbon from soil
Billions of tonnes of carbon dioxide risk being lost into the atmosphere due to tropical forest soils being significantly more sensitive to climate change than previously thought. (2020-08-12)
Group produces materials via self-organization in chemical systems
Applications range from sensors and batteries to fuel cells, among other technological possibilities. (2020-08-12)
Cremation in the Middle-East dates as far back as 7,000 B.C.
The gender of the human remains found inside a cremation pyre pit in Beisamoun, Israel remains unknown. (2020-08-12)
Human milk based fortifiers improve health outcomes for the smallest premature babies
More than 380,000 babies are born prematurely in the United States each year, according to the March of Dimes. (2020-08-12)
Insect diversity boosted by combination of crop diversity and semi-natural habitats
To enhance the number of beneficial insect species in agricultural land, preserving semi-natural habitats and promoting crop diversity are both needed, according to new research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied of Ecology. (2020-08-13)
Independent search engines respect your privacy but give more visibility to misinformation
Anti-vaccine websites, which could play a key role in promoting public hesitancy about a potential COVID vaccine, are far more likely to be found via independent search engines than through an internet giant like Google. (2020-08-13)
Ancient part of immune system may underpin severe COVID
New genetic and patient analyses suggest severe COVID is linked to overactive complement, one of the immune system's oldest branches, and excess blood clotting. (2020-08-03)
Cold-sensitive staphylococci reveal a weakness
A team from the University of Geneva has identified a new mechanism involved in the membrane synthesis of Staphylococcus aureus. (2020-08-03)
New method to defend against smart home cyber attacks developed by Ben-Gurion University researchers
According to their new study published in Computers & Security, the ability to launch massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks via a botnet of compromised devices is an exponentially growing risk in the Internet of Things (IoT). (2020-08-03)
Anatomy of an acne treatment
Sarecycline, a drug approved for use in the United States in 2018, is the first new antibiotic approved to treat acne in more than 40 years. (2020-08-03)
Humans and flies employ very similar mechanisms for brain development and function
A new study led by researchers from King's College London has shown that humans, mice and flies share the same fundamental genetic mechanisms that regulate the formation and function of brain areas involved in attention and movement control. (2020-08-03)
Brace yourself for these results
Researchers studying the mystery of why some weightlifters' muscles grow much more quickly than others' have found new answers through a novel experiment in which subjects worked out one leg and immobilized the other. (2020-08-04)
Cannabis use shows substantial risks, no benefits for cardiovascular health; Pachowicz identifying gaps and opportunities in space research
Observational studies have found no cardiovascular benefits associated with cannabis use. (2020-08-05)

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