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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf Archive (December 2018)

Science current events and science news from private research facilities, universities, government agencies and medical centers archive of articles from December, 2018.

Show All Years  •  2018  •  Show All Months (2018)  •  December

Week 48
Saturday December 1, 2018 (7)
Sunday December 2, 2018 (9)

Week 49
Monday December 3, 2018 (125)
Tuesday December 4, 2018 (120)
Wednesday December 5, 2018 (124)
Thursday December 6, 2018 (119)
Friday December 7, 2018 (52)
Sunday December 9, 2018 (5)

Week 50
Monday December 10, 2018 (115)
Tuesday December 11, 2018 (122)
Wednesday December 12, 2018 (127)
Thursday December 13, 2018 (126)
Friday December 14, 2018 (47)

Week 51
Monday December 17, 2018 (17)


Top Science Current Events and Science News from December 2018



Scientists enter unexplored territory in superconductivity search
Scientists mapping out the quantum characteristics of superconductors -- materials that conduct electricity with no energy loss -- have entered a new regime. (2018-12-06)
Delaying adjuvant chemo associated with worse outcomes for patients with triple-negative breast cancer
Patients with triple-negative breast cancer who delayed starting adjuvant chemotherapy for more than 30 days after surgery were at significantly higher risk for disease recurrence and death compared with those who started the treatment in the first 30 days after surgery, according to a retrospective study presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. (2018-12-05)
New device could help answer fundamental questions about quantum physics
Researchers have developed a new device that can measure and control a nanoparticle trapped in a laser beam with unprecedented sensitivity. (2018-12-13)
Ingestible capsule can be controlled wirelessly
MIT researchers have designed an ingestible capsule that can be controlled using Bluetooth wireless technology. (2018-12-13)
Genetic changes associated with physical activity reported
Machine learning used to improve understanding of sleep, physical (in)activity and their health consequences (2018-12-10)
Structure of electrolyte controls battery performance
The research team at the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology has reported that adding water into electrolyte improves the function of vanadium oxide, which is one of positive electrode material in calcium-ion batteries. (2018-12-04)
A 3D imaging technique unlocks properties of perovskite crystals
A team of materials scientists from Penn State, Cornell and Argonne National Laboratory have, for the first time, visualized the 3D atomic and electron density structure of the most complex perovskite crystal structure system decoded to date. (2018-12-06)
New properties of sulfur atom discovered
2019 will be, as proclaimed by the UN, the 'International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements', in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of its creation. (2018-12-14)
A young star caught forming like a planet
Astronomers have captured one of the most detailed views of a young star taken to date, and revealed an unexpected companion in orbit around it. (2018-12-14)
How does diet during pregnancy impact allergies in offspring?
A small percentage of women said they consumed fewer allergens during pregnancy to stave off food allergies in their newborns, according to preliminary research Karen Robbins, M.D., presented during the American College of Asthma Allergy and Immunology 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting. (2018-12-14)
New tool delivers swifter picture of cognitive deficit
A new tool, developed by researchers from the University of Adelaide, will assist clinicians to assess people suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). (2018-12-11)
Study reveals how Chinese travellers use technology abroad
Traditional cultural values and government policy influence how Chinese backpackers use technology while travelling, according to new research by the University of East Anglia (UEA). (2018-12-13)
Foxes in the city: Citizen science helps researchers to study urban wildlife
A team of researchers led by wildlife ecologist Theresa Walter analyzed over 1,100 fox sightings made by the public as part of the citizen science project StadtWildTiere (www.stadtwildtiere.at). (2018-12-14)
Revealed by a multidisciplinary effort: History of maize domestication not what we thought
The domestication of maize, a process which began in what is now central Mexico nearly 9,000 years ago, was far more complex and nuanced than once previously thought, a new study finds. (2018-12-13)
Exercise performed during adjuvant breast cancer treatment may improve cardio function
Women who underwent a supervised program of cardiovascular exercise during adjuvant breast cancer treatment experienced better cardiovascular function than those who were not part of the exercise program, according to results of the EBBA-II trial presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. (2018-12-07)
Siblings of children with autism or ADHD are at elevated risk for both disorders
Later-born siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at elevated risk for both disorders, a new study led by Meghan Miller, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and at the UC Davis MIND Institute, has concluded. (2018-12-10)
Cannabis-based compound may reduce seizures in children with epilepsy
Interest has been growing in the use of cannabinoids--the active chemicals in cannabis or marijuana-- for the treatment of epilepsy in children. (2018-12-05)
Reusable respirators are an effective and viable option for protecting health care personnel
Half-facepiece reusable elastomeric respirators are an effective and viable option for protecting health care workers from exposure to airborne transmissible contaminants or infectious agents -- for example, influenza virus -- during day-to-day work or with a sudden or rapid influx of patients, such as during a public health emergency, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2018-12-06)
Probiotics could help millions of patients suffering from bipolar disorder
About 3 million people in the US are diagnosed every year with bipolar disorder, a psychiatric condition characterized by dramatic shifts in mood from depression to mania. (2018-12-13)
NIH scientists find that breast cancer protection from pregnancy starts decades later
In general, women who have had children have a lower risk of breast cancer compared to women who have never given birth. (2018-12-14)
An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes
What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes -- while significantly reducing your electric bill and carbon footprint? (2018-12-13)
Inability to perform basic activities delays mental health patients' discharge
Mental health patients who have difficulty performing daily living tasks are four times more likely to experience discharge delays than someone who can perform those tasks independently. (2018-12-13)
Prostate cancer: New computer model enables researchers to predict course of disease
How does a normal cell turn into a deadly cancer? (2018-12-14)
Lifestyle intervention helped breast cancer survivors lose weight
Survivors of early-stage breast cancer who participated in a lifestyle intervention on healthy habits lost weight and experienced higher rates of disease-free survival if they completed the program, according to results presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. (2018-12-07)
Key to lifelong heart health is childhood intervention
Evolving evidence shows that heart healthy habits in adults are rooted in the environments we live in in early childhood, representing a window of opportunity in young children to focus on health promotion and potentially prevent disease in adulthood, according to a review paper published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2018-12-06)
RNAIII (RIP) & Deriv. as potential tools for the treatment of S. aureus biofilm infections
S. aureus under the biofilm mode of growth is often related to several nosocomial infections, more frequently associated with indwelling medical devices (catheters, prostheses, portacaths or heart valves).The present paper will provide an overview on the activity and potential applications of RIP as biofilm inhibiting compound, useful in the management of S. aureus biofilm infections. (2018-12-14)
Stress in new mothers causes lasting health risks, depending on race, ethnicity, poverty
African-American women undergo more physical 'wear-and-tear' during the first year after giving birth than Latina and white women, a consequence that may have long-lasting health effects, according to a study of a diverse group of more than 2,400 low-income women. (2018-12-14)
Can stem cells help a diseased heart heal itself? Researcher achieves important milestone
A team of Rutgers scientists have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves -- a new model that would reduce the need for bypass surgery, heart transplants or artificial pumping devices. (2018-12-14)
What social stress in monkeys can tell us about human health
A new University of Washington-led study examines one key stress-inducing circumstance -- the effects of social hierarchy -- and how cells respond to the hormones that are released in response to that stress. (2018-12-11)
Glutamate receptor affects the development of brain cells after birth
It had been previously assumed that this protein is only relevant in adults. (2018-12-06)
Drawing is better than writing for memory retention
Researchers from the University of Waterloo found that even if people weren't good at it, drawing, as a method to help retain new information, was better than re-writing notes, visualization exercises or passively looking at images. (2018-12-06)
CAR-T cell update: Therapy improves outcomes for patients with B-cell lymphoma
An international phase-2 trial of a CAR-T cell therapy--to be published on-line Dec. (2018-12-01)
Online game trains players how to sort waste correctly
A simple online game can teach people to more accurately sort waste--with lasting results, a new UBC study has found. (2018-12-11)
New drug seeks receptors in sarcoma cells, attacks tumors in animal trials
A new compound that targets a receptor within sarcoma cancer cells shrank tumors and hampered their ability to spread in mice and pigs, a study from researchers at the University of Illinois reports. (2018-12-13)
Study shows magnesium optimizes vitamin D status
A randomized trial by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers indicates that magnesium optimizes vitamin D status, raising it in people with deficient levels and lowering it in people with high levels. (2018-12-14)
Birth of a hybrid
Scientists from NUST MISIS and the Merzhanov Institute of Structural Macrokinetics & Materials Science have developed a new method for producing bulk MAX-phases -- layered materials which simultaneously possess the properties of metals and ceramics. (2018-12-14)
Vitamin C may reduce harm to infants' lungs caused by smoking during pregnancy
Vitamin C may reduce the harm done to lungs in infants born to mothers who smoke during their pregnancy, according to a randomized, controlled trial published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2018-12-07)
Monitoring the environment with artificial intelligence
Microorganisms perform key functions in ecosystems and their diversity reflects the health of their environment. (2018-12-13)
The role of lipid nanoparticles and its surface modification in reaching the brain
Nanomedicine is a field of science that employs materials in the nanometer scale.Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are the most common disorders worldwide, becoming a serious economic burden and public health problem.In this review, we have highlighted the potential of lipid nanoparticles in reaching the brain, a challenging task in modern medicine. (2018-12-14)
Using water molecules to unlock neurons' secrets
EPFL researchers have developed a method to observe the electrical activity of neurons by analyzing the behavior of surrounding water molecules. (2018-12-11)
New approach towards an improved treatment of anxiety disorders
Traumatic experiences can become deeply entrenched in a person's memory. (2018-12-11)
A holiday gift to primary care doctors: Proof of their time crunch
The average primary care doctor needs to work six more hours a day than they already do, in order to make sure their patients get all the preventive and early-detection care they deserve, a new study finds. (2018-12-14)
Mayo-led study: Drug reduces hot flashes, improves breast cancer survivor quality of life
Research led by oncologists Roberto Leon-Ferre, M.D. and Charles Loprinzi, M.D. of Mayo Clinic has found that the drug oxybutynin helps to reduce the frequency and intensity of hot flashes in women who are unable to take hormone replacement therapy, including breast cancer survivors. (2018-12-07)
Fitness instructors' comments shape women's body satisfaction
A new Northwestern University study found that while exercise, in this case, a 16-minute conditioning class, generally improved women's mood and body satisfaction, women felt even better if the instructor made motivational comments that focused on strength and health instead of on losing weight or changing the appearance of one's body. (2018-12-13)
Increasing statins dose and patient adherence could save more lives
Thousands of heart attacks and deaths from cardiovascular disease could be prevented by patients taking higher doses of statins and taking the drugs as advised by doctors. (2018-12-07)
New research suggests how parents protect children from the long-term effects of stress
When young children experience violence or poverty, the effect can last well into adulthood. (2018-12-13)
Quantum chemical calculations on quantum computers
A new quantum algorithm has been implemented for quantum chemical calculations such as Full-CI on quantum computers without exponential/combinatorial explosion, giving exact solutions of Schroedinger Equations for atoms and molecules, for the first time. (2018-12-14)
The parable of universal health cover for people on the move
Research published in The Lancet on December 5 revealed that harmful and unfounded myths about migration and health have become accepted and that these are used to justify policies of exclusion. (2018-12-13)
Hong Kong's waters benefit health and wellbeing
A ground-breaking study has revealed how spending time in and around Hong Kong's 'blue spaces' (harbours, coastlines and beaches) is linked to better health and wellbeing, especially for older adults. (2018-12-11)
BMI is a good measure of health after all, new study finds
A new study from the University of Bristol supports body mass index as a useful tool for assessing obesity and health. (2018-12-11)

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Circular
We're told if the economy is growing, and if we keep producing, that's a good thing. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers explore circular systems that regenerate and re-use what we already have. Guests include economist Kate Raworth, environmental activist Tristram Stuart, landscape architect Kate Orff, entrepreneur David Katz, and graphic designer Jessi Arrington.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#504 The Art of Logic
How can mathematics help us have better arguments? This week we spend the hour with "The Art of Logic in an Illogical World" author, mathematician Eugenia Cheng, as she makes her case that the logic of mathematics can combine with emotional resonance to allow us to have better debates and arguments. Along the way we learn a lot about rigorous logic using arguments you're probably having every day, while also learning a lot about our own underlying beliefs and assumptions.