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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf Archive (February 2019)

Science current events and science news from private research facilities, universities, government agencies and medical centers archive of articles from February, 2019.

Show All Years  •  2019  •  Show All Months (2019)  •  February

Week 05
Friday February 1, 2019 (54)
Sunday February 3, 2019 (4)

Week 06
Monday February 4, 2019 (109)
Tuesday February 5, 2019 (109)
Wednesday February 6, 2019 (129)
Thursday February 7, 2019 (141)
Friday February 8, 2019 (75)
Saturday February 9, 2019 (1)
Sunday February 10, 2019 (4)

Week 07
Monday February 11, 2019 (141)
Tuesday February 12, 2019 (93)
Wednesday February 13, 2019 (112)
Thursday February 14, 2019 (120)
Friday February 15, 2019 (56)


Top Science Current Events and Science News from February 2019



Micromotors deliver oral vaccines
Vaccines have saved millions of lives, but nobody likes getting a shot. (2019-02-06)
Gummy-like robots that could help prevent disease
EPFL scientists have developed microscopic, hydrogel-based muscles that can manipulate and mechanically stimulate biological tissue. (2019-02-08)
Electronic tool has potential to improve asthma care, study finds
A new electronic decision support tool for managing asthma has the potential to improve the quality of asthma care in primary care settings, suggests a study led by St. (2019-02-14)
A simulator allows patients to experiment how their vision will improve before surgery
For the first time, patients will be able to experience how their vision will improve after a cataract surgery just before being operated. (2019-02-07)
Palm oil not the only driver of forest loss in Indonesia
Large-scale agriculture, primarily for growing oil palms, remains a major cause of deforestation in Indonesia but its impact has diminished in recent years as other natural and human causes emerge, a Duke University study finds. (2019-02-01)
Exceptional new titanosaur from middle Cretaceous Tanzania: Mnyamawamtuka
An exceptional sauropod dinosaur specimen from the middle Cretaceous of Tanzania represents a unique species and provides new insights into sauropod evolution, according to a study published Feb. (2019-02-13)
Study: Much of the surface ocean will shift in color by end of 21st century
Climate change is causing significant changes to phytoplankton in the world's oceans, and a new MIT study finds that over the coming decades these changes will affect the ocean's color, intensifying its blue regions and its green ones. (2019-02-04)
The future of minority health and health disparities research is here
Thirty specific research strategies were identified across the three pillars that guided the science visioning: methods and measurement, etiology, and interventions. (2019-02-01)
Faster than allowed by quantum computing?
Quantum computers are more powerful than classical computers since they work with coherent ''quantum bits'' instead of ordinary zeroes and ones. (2019-02-01)
Lettuce show you how to restore oil-soaked soil
Rice University engineers have fine-tuned a method to restore oil-soaked soil to fertility while eliminating toxic hydrocarbons. (2019-02-01)
Scientists discover potential way to treat and prevent cancer in children (neuroblastoma)
The MYCN oncogene is known to be a key cause of a number of deadly solid tumour cancers, including neuroblastoma which claims more lives of children under 5 than any other cancer. (2019-02-01)
Study finds a dearth of mental health interventions for ethnic minority youth in the US
A research team from Arizona State University, DePaul University and the University of Southern California analyzed how effective evidence-based mental health intervention programs were for ethnic minority youth in the United States. (2019-02-08)
Fruit and vegetables may be important for mental as well as physical well-being
Researchers at the universities of Leeds and York analysed data from more than 40,000 people in the UK, and found that changes in fruit and vegetable consumption are correlated with changes in mental well-being. (2019-02-05)
Enzyme warps space to break the cell's speed limit
Johns Hopkins researchers have found that rhomboid enzymes, which are special proteins that cut other proteins, are able to break the 'cellular speed limit' as they move through the cell membrane. (2019-02-01)
Kazan University puts forth ideas on the nature of dark matter
As we currently know, dark energy and dark matter comprise 96 percent of the total mass of the Universe. (2019-02-05)
Shedding light on the science of auroral breakups
Japanese scientists have quantitatively confirmed how energetic an auroral breakup can be. (2019-02-08)
Healthy diet can ease symptoms of depression
An analysis of data from almost 46,000 people has found that weight loss, nutrient boosting and fat reduction diets can all reduce the symptoms of depression. (2019-02-05)
Some primary care doctors not prepared to help with cancer treatment decisions
Research has shown patients are discussing initial cancer treatment options with their primary care doctors. (2019-02-12)
Antarctic meltwater streams shed light on longstanding hydrological mystery
In one of the coldest, driest places on Earth, CU Boulder scientists have developed a possible answer to a longstanding mystery about the chemistry of streamflow, which may have broad implications for watersheds and water quality around the world. (2019-02-01)
No sweat? That's an issue for home-schooled children
Children schooled at home may not get enough exercise even if they participate in organized sports and physical activities, according to researchers at Rice University. (2019-02-01)
The dangers of hidden fat: Exercise is your best defense against deep abdominal fat
Researchers analyzed two types of interventions -- lifestyle modification (exercise) and pharmacological (medicine) -- to learn how best to defeat fat lying deep in the belly. (2019-02-01)
Dengue virus infection may cause severe outcomes following Zika virus infection during pregnancy
This study is the first to report a possible mechanism for the enhancement of Zika virus progression during pregnancy in an animal model. (2019-02-08)
Shorter course of radiation therapy effective in treating men with prostate cancer
A new UCLA-led study shows that men with low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer can safely undergo higher doses of radiation over a significantly shorter period of time and still have the same, successful outcomes as from a much longer course of treatment. (2019-02-08)
Graphene biosensor could provide early lung cancer diagnosis, research shows
The wonder-material graphene could hold the key to unlocking the next generation of advanced, early stage lung cancer diagnosis. (2019-02-04)
Planning ahead: A new robust approach for minimizing costs in power-distribution networks
Scientists at Tokyo Tech have developed a new method for scheduling the turning on and off of power generators that minimizes costs and ensures reliability while addressing the issues prevalent in multiple previous methods. (2019-02-08)
Women's hormones play role in drug addiction, higher relapse rates
Female-specific interventions are needed, but in the meantime, treatment centers could use this study to educate women about their stronger mental connections to places and objects. (2019-02-08)
Researchers develop prostate cancer prediction tool that has unmatched accuracy
Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California have developed a novel machine-learning framework that distinguishes between low- and high-risk prostate cancer with more precision than ever before. (2019-02-07)
Psychology: Robot saved, people take the hit
To what extent are people prepared to show consideration for robots? (2019-02-08)
A new protocol for Hepatitis A vaccination to prevent a vaccine-resistant virus
Researchers of the University of Barcelona (UB) have analysed, with massive sequencing techniques for the first time, the evolution of the Hepatitis A virus with samples from patients. (2019-02-08)
Gene therapy cassettes improved for muscular dystrophy
Experimental gene therapy cassettes for Duchenne muscular dystrophy have been modified to deliver better performance. (2019-02-01)
ATS publishes new clinical guideline on home oxygen for children
The American Thoracic Society has developed a new clinical practice guideline for home oxygen therapy for children. (2019-02-01)
The Caucasus: Complex interplay of genes and cultures
In the Bronze Age, the Caucasus Mountains region was a cultural and genetic contact zone. (2019-02-04)
Famous 'sandpile model' shown to move like a traveling sand dune
The so-called Abelian sandpile model has been studied by scientists for more than 30 years. (2019-02-08)
Investigating cell stress for better health -- and better beer
Human beings are not the only ones who suffer from stress -- even microorganisms can be affected. (2019-02-12)
A new toolkit for studying how 'PARP' activity boosts cancers
A new method developed by scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is likely to speed the study of an important biological process called ADP-ribosylation. (2019-02-01)
Scientists image conducting edges in a promising 2D material
A research team comprised of scientists at the University of California, Riverside, and the University of Washington has for the first time directly imaged 'edge conduction' in monolayer tungsten ditelluride, or WTe2, a newly discovered 2D topological insulator and quantum material. (2019-02-08)
Site of care may affect patients' access to palliative treatment
Studies have found that racial and ethnic minorities are less likely to receive end-of-life palliative care than their counterparts. (2019-02-01)
New UC study may help guide treatment of pediatric anxiety
Researchers from the University of Cincinnati looked at common medications prescribed for children and adolescents with anxiety disorders, to determine the most effective and best-tolerated. (2019-02-01)
Crunching the data: New liver cancer subtypes revealed immunologically
Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers used substantial datasets on liver cancer patients to develop a new classification of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) into three distinct subgroups with different genetic, immunological, and clinical features. (2019-02-01)
Study identifies new target to prevent, treat alcoholism
New research conducted at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, identifies a gene that could provide a new target for developing medication to prevent and treat alcoholism. (2019-02-08)
Diets consisting of fewer calories improve cell performance
Animal experiments have shown that caloric restriction causes cellular changes that can prevent diseases, the subject of a session at FAPESP Week London. (2019-02-12)
A gut feeling for mental health
The first population-level study on the link between gut bacteria and mental health identifies specific gut bacteria linked to depression and provides evidence that a wide range of gut bacteria can produce neuroactive compounds. (2019-02-04)
'Eavesdropping' technology used to protect one of New Zealand's rarest birds
Remote recording devices used to 'eavesdrop' on a reintroduced population of one of New Zealand's rarest birds have been heralded as a breakthrough for conservation. (2019-02-05)
Blacks with high socioeconomic status less likely to seek mental health care
In her latest research paper Sirry Alang questions why there is a significant unmet need for mental health care among Blacks and identifies solutions among healthcare systems to fix it: teach the history of racism in medicine; and actively seek, privilege and legitimize the narratives of black people. (2019-02-05)
Rice U. lab adds porous envelope to aluminum plasmonics
New research from Rice University's Laboratory for Nanophotonics describes the first combination of a gas-trapping molecular sieve called a metal-organic framework, or MOF, with catalytic aluminum nanocrystals that can draw their power from sunlight. (2019-02-08)
Munitions at the bottom of the Baltic Sea
The bottom of the Baltic Sea is home to large quantities of sunken munitions, a legacy of the Second World War -- and often very close to shore. (2019-02-08)
Invisible tags: Physicists at TU Dresden write, read and erase using light
A team of physicists headed by Professor Sebastian Reineke of TU Dresden developed a new method of storing information in fully transparent plastic foils. (2019-02-01)
Women who wear Muslim garments in court are viewed as more credible witnesses
Sexual assault victims wearing the hijab or niqab are viewed more positively when testifying in court than uncovered women reveals a study. (2019-02-01)
Straightforward biosynthesis of functional bulk nanocomposites
A general and scalable biosynthesis strategy has been developed which involves simultaneous growth of cellulose nanofibrils through microbial fermentation and co-deposition of various kinds of nanoscale building blocks through aerosol feeding on solid culture substrates. (2019-02-01)
Novel hypothesis goes underground to predict future of Greenland ice sheet
The Greenland ice sheet melted a little more easily in the past than it does today because of geological changes, and most of Greenland's ice can be saved from melting if warming is controlled, says a team of Penn State researchers. (2019-02-01)

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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