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Science News Archive | Brightsurf | (February 2020)

Science news and current events archive from February, 2020.

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Week 05
Sunday February 2, 2020 (6)

Week 06
Monday February 3, 2020 (126)
Tuesday February 4, 2020 (96)
Wednesday February 5, 2020 (138)
Thursday February 6, 2020 (123)
Friday February 7, 2020 (77)
Sunday February 9, 2020 (5)

Week 07
Monday February 10, 2020 (113)
Tuesday February 11, 2020 (95)
Wednesday February 12, 2020 (131)
Thursday February 13, 2020 (126)
Friday February 14, 2020 (89)
Saturday February 15, 2020 (20)
Sunday February 16, 2020 (10)

Week 08
Monday February 17, 2020 (110)
Tuesday February 18, 2020 (113)
Wednesday February 19, 2020 (120)
Thursday February 20, 2020 (118)
Friday February 21, 2020 (62)
Sunday February 23, 2020 (4)

Week 09
Monday February 24, 2020 (124)
Tuesday February 25, 2020 (99)
Wednesday February 26, 2020 (134)
Thursday February 27, 2020 (123)
Friday February 28, 2020 (69)


Top Science Current Events and Science News from February 2020



Losing coastal plant communities to climate change will weaken sea defences
New research led by the University of Plymouth suggests the impact of rising sea levels and the increased frequency and intensity of extreme storm events on coastal plants needs to be placed in greater focus. (2020-02-03)
Grooves hold promise for sophisticated healing
Rice University bioengineers print 3D implants with layered cells destined to become distinct combinations of tissue, like bone and cartilage. (2020-02-04)
Breaking up amino acids with radiation
A new experimental and theoretical study published in EPJ D has shown how the ions formed when electrons collide with one amino acid, glutamine, differ according to the energy of the colliding electrons. (2020-02-05)
Protein could offer therapeutic target for breast cancer metastasis
A new study by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers suggests that targeting a protein known as heat shock protein 47 could be key for suppressing breast cancer metastasis. (2020-02-05)
Studies on mass shootings assess trends, gauge effectiveness, and recommend policies
In the last decade, thousands have been killed as a result of mass violence. (2020-02-06)
More teens coming out as LGBQ, but suicide attempts still high: BU study
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds that the proportion of high school students identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning (LGBQ) doubled from 2009 to 2017, while the LGBQ teen rate of attempted suicide went from five times the rate for their straight peers to nearly four times the rate. (2020-02-10)
Prebiotics help mice fight melanoma by activating anti-tumor immunity
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that two prebiotics, mucin and inulin, slowed the growth of melanoma in mice by boosting the immune system's ability to fight cancer. (2020-02-11)
Polar bears in Baffin Bay skinnier, having fewer cubs due to less sea ice
Satellite tracking of adult females and visual monitoring of polar bears in Baffin Bay show changes from the 1990s to the period from 2009 to 2015. (2020-02-12)
New technique reduces pathogen identification time from two weeks to less than one hour
Canola is a billion-dollar crop for Canada but the growing season in Western Canada is very short. (2020-02-12)
NIST researchers link quartz microbalance measurements to international measurement system
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have found a way to link measurements made by a device integral to microchip fabrication and other industries directly to the recently redefined International System of Units (SI, the modern metric system). (2020-02-12)
Acid reflux drug is a surprising candidate to curb preterm birth
Lansoprazole, an over-the-counter acid reflux drug that is often taken by pregnant women, may be a promising therapy to reduce preterm birth, according to a computational drug repurposing study that also tested several of the drugs in mice. (2020-02-13)
Reconstructing the diet of fossil vertebrates
Paleodietary studies of the fossil record are impeded by a lack of reliable and unequivocal tracers. (2020-02-17)
When less is more: Designer slits make glasslike materials much stronger
By removing material via specially designed cuts in a glasslike material, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, and the University of Pennsylvania in the US have changed the mechanical properties of the material. (2020-02-15)
Solar technology breakthrough at the University of Queensland
UQ researchers have set a world record for the conversion of solar energy to electricity via the use of tiny nanoparticles called 'quantum dots'. (2020-02-18)
Researchers identify new biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer
Applying bioinformatics to resolve biological problems. This is the objective of the research group of the University of Malaga ''BI4NEXT'', which, in one of its latest studies, developed in the Supercomputing and Bioinnovation Center (SCBI) based on biobank samples, has identified new biomarkers for the diagnosis, prognosis and even treatment of lung cancer. (2020-02-20)
'Stranger Things' associated with public awareness of rare disorder
The actor who plays Dustin Henderson on the popular Netflix series 'Stranger Things' was born with cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD), a rare disorder of which the most prominent features are missing or abnormal growth of the teeth and collarbones. (2020-02-20)
Magnetic field at Martian surface ten times stronger than expected
New data gleaned from the magnetic sensor aboard NASA's InSight spacecraft is offering an unprecedented close-up of magnetic fields on Mars. (2020-02-24)
Community support groups vital to African american women with breast cancer
Shelley White-Means, Ph.D., a professor at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, is the principal investigator of a paper published this month in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health that found breast cancer support groups play a major role in helping underserved African-American women at risk for or diagnosed with breast cancer in Memphis. (2020-02-25)
Scientists discover dust from Middle East cools the Red Sea
Researchers at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) have discovered dust from the Middle East has a positive cooling effect over the land and the Red Sea. (2020-02-26)
Nanosize device 'uncloaks' cancer cells in mice and reveals them to the immune system
Scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have designed and successfully tested an experimental, super small package able to deliver molecular signals that tag implanted human cancer cells in mice and make them visible for destruction by the animals' immune systems. (2020-02-26)
Antioxidant precursor molecule could improve brain function in patients with MS
The naturally occurring molecule N-acetylcysteine (NAC) shows benefit in a clinical trial for multiple sclerosis. (2020-02-26)
Antarctic ice walls protect the climate
Inland Antarctic ice contains volumes of water that can raise global sea levels by several metres. (2020-02-27)
Polymers get caught up in love-hate chemistry of oil and water
Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee achieved a rare look at the inner workings of polymer self-assembly at an oil-water interface to advance materials for neuromorphic computing and bio-inspired technologies. (2020-02-27)
Study paints picture of marijuana use in pregnant women
As marijuana is increasingly being legalized in US states, daily marijuana use among pregnant women is rising, despite evidence that this could harm their babies. (2020-02-04)
Antioxidant reverses BPD-induced fertility damage in worms
Treatment with a naturally occurring antioxidant, CoQ10, restores many aspects of fertility in C. elegans worms following exposure to BPA Findings offer possible path toward undoing BPA-induced reproductive harms in people Although CoQ10 is available over the counter, it is not yet clear whether the compound could improve human fertility or do so safely (2020-02-06)
Gaps remain in rural opioid crisis research
Rural areas have been hit hard by the opioid crisis, but few studies have been done to understand how to improve access to treatment and reduce the overdose death rate in these communities, according to a new study by Rutgers University, the University of Michigan, and Wayne State University. (2020-02-06)
Collaboration lets researchers 'read' proteins for new properties
A collaboration between the McKelvey School of Engineering and St. (2020-02-06)
The brain of migraine sufferers is hyper-excitable, new study suggests
Individuals who suffer from migraine headaches appear to have a hyper-excitable visual cortex researchers at the Universities of Birmingham and Lancaster suggest. (2020-02-10)
A happy partner leads to a healthier future
Michigan State University research found that those who are optimistic contribute to the health of their partners, staving off the risk factors leading to Alzheimer's disease, dementia and cognitive decline as they grow old together. (2020-02-10)
The Lancet: Preliminary evidence suggests that new coronavirus cannot be passed from mother to child late in pregnancy
There is currently no evidence that the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) causes severe adverse outcomes in neonates or that it can pass to the child while in the womb, according to a small observational study of women from Wuhan, China, who were in the third trimester of pregnancy and had pneumonia caused by COVID-19. (2020-02-12)
Second antibiotic no advantage for treating super-bug Golden Staph
A world-first clinical trial has called into question the effectiveness of using more than one antibiotic to treat the deadly 'super-bug', Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Bacteremia, commonly known as Golden Staph. (2020-02-13)
Pitt study uncovers new electronic state of matter
The discovery shows that when electrons can be made to attract one another, they can form bunches of two, three, four and five electrons that behave like new types of particles. (2020-02-13)
Scientists reveal catalytic mechanism of lovastatin hydrolase
The research team led by Prof. LU Xuefeng from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), revealed the catalytic mechanism and structure-function relationship of the specific and efficient lovastatin hydrolase PcEST. (2020-02-14)
Algorithms 'consistently' more accurate than people in predicting recidivism, study says
In a study with potentially far-reaching implications for criminal justice in the United States, a team of California researchers has found that algorithms are significantly more accurate than humans in predicting which defendants will later be arrested for a new crime. (2020-02-14)
Zooming in on breast cancer reveals how mutations shape the tumour landscape
Scientists have created one of the most detailed maps of breast cancer ever achieved, revealing how genetic changes shape the physical tumour landscape, according to research funded by Cancer Research UK and published in Nature Cancer today (Monday). (2020-02-17)
Pancreatic cancer 'time machine' exposes plot twist in cell growth and invasion
A pancreatic cancer 'time machine' engineered by Purdue University researchers has revealed that the disease is even more unpredictable than previously thought: cancer cells promote each other's invasiveness when they grow together. (2020-02-17)
The integrated catalysts can simplify pharmaceutical manufacturing
Prof. In Su Lee and his research team from POSTECH developed catalytic platforms based on metal organic frameworks. (2020-02-21)
Guidelines for thyroid surgery published in Annals of Surgery
The first set of comprehensive, evidence-based clinical guidelines for surgical treatment of thyroid disease -- developed by an expert panel assembled by the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons (AAES) -- was published today by Annals of Surgery. (2020-02-21)
How the urban environment affects the diet of its citizens
In the high-impact journal Appetite the UPV/EHU's Nursing and Health Promotion research group has published a study using photovoice methodology and which qualitatively compares citizens' perceptions about the food environment in three Bilbao neighbourhoods with different socioeconomic levels. (2020-02-24)
Defects add color to quantum systems
Researchers are investigating light-emitting defects in materials that may someday form the basis of quantum-based technologies, such as quantum computers, quantum networks or engines that run on light. (2020-02-24)
New immunotherapeutic strategy shows promise in eradicating infectious biofilms
The same way baking soda breaks down grease and grime, making surfaces easier to clean, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University now show that a new therapeutic molecule can break apart communities of harmful bacteria, opening the way for bacteria-killing antibiotics to more effectively clear out infections. (2020-02-27)
Researchers successfully test coin-sized smart insulin patch, potential diabetes treatment
The study, published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, describes research conducted on mice and pigs. (2020-02-04)
Study provides new understanding of mitochondria genome with potential for new avenues of treatment for multiple cancers
A study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center furthered understanding about mitochondria, the cell components known as the 'powerhouse of the cell.' Knowing more about the genome is crucial given that mitochondria play important roles in tumorigenesis. (2020-02-05)
How plants are built to be strong and responsive
Researchers have solved the long-standing mystery of how plants control the arrangement of their cellulose fibres. (2020-02-06)
Using neutrons and X-rays to analyze the aging of lithium batteries
An international team has used neutron and X-ray tomography to investigate the dynamic processes that lead to capacity degradation at the electrodes in lithium batteries. (2020-02-07)
Understanding gut microbiota, one cell at a time
Summary: Waseda University scientists devised a novel single-cell genomic sequencing technique that enables detailed, functional analysis of uncultured bacteria and identified bacterial responders of dietary fiber inulin in mouse gut microbiota. (2020-02-07)
Study: It's devastatingly common for African mothers to experience child loss
University of Southern California and University of Chicago sociologists propose new indicators to estimate how common it is for mothers to have experienced the death of a child. (2020-02-10)
Bayreuth researchers discover new arsenic compounds in rice fields
University of Bayreuth researchers, together with scientists from Italy and China, have for the first time sys-tematically investigated under which conditions, and to what extent, sulphur-containing arsenic com-pounds are formed in rice-growing soils. (2020-02-11)
Understanding how laws affect public health: An update on legal epidemiology
Laws can have important effects on public health risks and outcomes, while research can provide key evidence to inform effective health-related laws and policies. (2020-02-11)
UC research could help reduce disease incidence in organ donors
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati are among the first to adopt genotyping that helps identify and predict the risk accompanying individuals wishing to donate a kidney. (2020-02-11)

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