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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf Archive (January 2018)

Science current events and science news from private research facilities, universities, government agencies and medical centers archive of articles from January, 2018.

Show All Years  •  2018  •  Show All Months (2018)  •  January

Week 01
Monday January 1, 2018 (7)
Tuesday January 2, 2018 (59)
Wednesday January 3, 2018 (85)
Thursday January 4, 2018 (89)
Friday January 5, 2018 (40)
Sunday January 7, 2018 (2)

Week 02
Monday January 8, 2018 (81)
Tuesday January 9, 2018 (113)
Wednesday January 10, 2018 (121)
Thursday January 11, 2018 (112)
Friday January 12, 2018 (48)
Sunday January 14, 2018 (5)

Week 03
Monday January 15, 2018 (61)
Tuesday January 16, 2018 (113)
Wednesday January 17, 2018 (120)
Thursday January 18, 2018 (101)
Friday January 19, 2018 (57)
Sunday January 21, 2018 (6)

Week 04
Monday January 22, 2018 (118)
Tuesday January 23, 2018 (105)
Wednesday January 24, 2018 (130)
Thursday January 25, 2018 (102)
Friday January 26, 2018 (42)
Sunday January 28, 2018 (9)

Week 05
Monday January 29, 2018 (97)
Tuesday January 30, 2018 (80)
Wednesday January 31, 2018 (112)


Top Science Current Events and Science News from January 2018



AI 'scientist' finds that toothpaste ingredient may help fight drug-resistant malaria
An ingredient commonly found in toothpaste could be employed as an anti-malarial drug against strains of malaria parasite that have grown resistant to one of the currently used drugs. (2018-01-18)
Study uncovers healthcare disparities among octogenarians and nonagenarians with advanced lung cancer
A new study reveals that, among patients of advanced age with stage III lung cancer, African Americans and individuals who live in lower income areas are more likely to not receive any treatment. (2018-01-08)
New epidemiological study finds no connection between cases of cancer and use of plant protection products containing glyphosate
BfR Communication No. 036/2017 from 22 December 2017 Epidemiological studies are a central element of public discussion in the debate surrounding the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate. (2018-01-12)
Poor dental health increases risks of frailty in older men
Over a three-year period, researchers from the United Kingdom examined the relationship between poor oral health and older adults' risks for becoming frail. (2018-01-04)
Study uncovers key to preventing back pain in runners
Low back pain is a common complaint among both elite and recreational runners, but the true cause of it remains a mystery. (2018-01-03)
Are vitamin supplements used before or during pregnancy associated with risk of autism spectrum disorder?
The use of folic acid and multivitamin supplements by women before and during pregnancy was associated with a lower likelihood of autism spectrum disorder in children but this finding  needs to be interpreted with caution because other factors could explain it. (2018-01-03)
X chromosome reactivation could treat Rett syndrome, other X-linked disorders
A study from a team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators points toward a potential strategy for treating X-linked disorders -- those caused by mutations in the X chromosome -- in females. (2018-01-04)
Physicists build muscle for shape-changing, cell-sized robots
A Cornell University team has made a robot exoskeleton that can rapidly change its shape upon sensing chemical or thermal changes in its environment. (2018-01-03)
Pediatricians screen more kids for mental health issues if they receive hands-on support
The study, led by Children's National, is called an important first step toward earlier identification of children who live with serious mental health concerns. (2018-01-03)
Scientists uncover why sauna bathing is good for your health
Scientists at the University of Eastern Finland have shown that sauna bathing is associated with a variety of health benefits. (2018-01-05)
Family Medicine and Community Health Journal Volume 5, Issue Number 4 publishes
The December 2017 issue includes an editorial, five original research articles, one case study, one systematic review and two China Focus articles addressing various topics in family medicine in both China and internationally. (2018-01-05)
Science for a resilient EU power grid
The Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, have analysed 16 earthquakes, 15 space weather events and 20 floods, presenting recommendations on how to improve the resilience of the power grid against these natural hazards. (2018-01-04)
NASA looks at rainfall intensity in Tropical Depression Bolaven
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite gathered data on rainfall rates occurring in Tropical Depression Bolaven as it moved toward Vietnam. (2018-01-04)
Semiconductor breakthrough may be game-changer for organic solar cells
In an advance that could push cheap, ubiquitous solar power closer to reality, University of Michigan researchers have found a way to coax electrons to travel much further than was previously thought possible in the materials often used for organic solar cells and other organic semiconductors. (2018-01-17)
A look into the fourth dimension
In our daily experience space has three dimensions. Recently, however, a physical phenomenon that only occurs in four spatial dimensions could be observed in two experiments. (2018-01-04)
Harnessing the potential of blockchain to transform education
Blockchain technology can help improve old models of data management and bring benefits to learners and educational institutions in the EU -- if policymakers are well prepared to embrace the change. (2018-01-05)
Predicting the effect of climate change on crop yields
Scientists now have a new tool to predict the future effects of climate change on crop yields. (2018-01-03)
Children with chronic illness often show signs of mental health problems
Researchers from the University of Waterloo surveyed children between the ages of six and 16, and all within a month of their diagnosis with asthma, food allergy, epilepsy, diabetes or juvenile arthritis. (2018-01-04)
Building stronger health systems could help prevent the next epidemic in Madagascar
The peak epidemic season for plague in Madagascar is fast approaching and the severity of these outbreaks could be significantly reduced with improvements to their public health system, argues Matthew Bonds from Harvard Medical School and the nongovernmental health care organization, PIVOT, in a new Viewpoint publishing Jan. (2018-01-04)
Stealth virus for cancer therapy
Scientists from the University of Zurich have redesigned an adenovirus for use in cancer therapy. (2018-01-31)
Tobacco shops associated with crime in urban communities of color
Tobacco shops, also known as smoke shops, may represent potential 'nuisance properties' in urban communities of color, a study led by a researcher at the University of California, Riverside has found. (2018-01-05)
Morris Animal Foundation-funded study shows importance of wildlife in controlling ticks
Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers from the University of California, Santa Barbara, have found that a decrease in wildlife populations causes an upsurge in local tick populations, potentially increasing the threat of infectious diseases globally. (2018-01-03)
Total-body PET: Maximizing sensitivity for clinical research and patient care
The new total-body PET/CT scanner could revolutionize our understanding and treatment of disease through analysis of better imaging data from the whole body. (2018-01-03)
Research reveals evidence of new population of ancient Native Americans
Genetic analysis of ancient DNA from a 6-week-old infant found at an Interior Alaska archaeological site has revealed a previously unknown population of ancient people in North America. (2018-01-03)
Aerobic exercise may mildly delay, slightly improve Alzheimer's symptoms
Geriatrics experts have suggested that exercising can improve brain health in older adults. (2018-01-26)
Exposing hypocrisy can effectively reduce collective blame of Muslims for individual violent acts
White Americans were less likely to blame all Muslims for acts of terror committed by a Muslim when they were first asked to think about how much they were responsible for terrorist acts committed by other Whites. (2018-01-17)
Curbing climate change
Humans may be the dominant cause of global temperature rise, but they may also be a crucial factor in helping to reduce it, according to a new study that for the first time builds a novel model to measure the effects of behavior on climate. (2018-01-01)
New brain mapping technique highlights relationship between connectivity and IQ
A new and relatively simple technique for mapping the wiring of the brain has shown a correlation between how well connected an individual's brain regions are and their intelligence, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2018-01-02)
Frequency of autism spectrum disorder in US stable in recent years
The frequency of autism spectrum disorder among US children and adolescents was stable from 2014-2016 based on data from a nationally representative annual survey. (2018-01-02)
Girls' social camouflage skills may delay or prevent autism diagnosis
On parent-reporting measures, girls with autism seem to struggle more than boys with performing routine tasks like getting up and dressed or making small talk, even when the study group is normalized to meet similar basic clinical diagnostic criteria across sexes. (2018-01-04)
Pong paddles and perception: Our actions influence what we see
Most people think of vision as simply a function of information the eye gathers. (2018-01-03)
Eating more foods with choline during pregnancy could boost baby's brain
When expectant mothers consume sufficient amounts of the nutrient choline during pregnancy, their offspring gain enduring cognitive benefits, a new Cornell University study suggests. (2018-01-04)
Exploring the realistic nature of the wave function in quantum mechanics
The wave function is central in quantum mechanics and describes the quantum state of microscopic objects. (2018-01-04)
Genetic sequencing points to endemic origin of monkeypox virus outbreak in Nigeria
Scientists working to control a human outbreak of monkeypox virus (MXPV) in Nigeria performed genetic sequencing of patient samples, revealing that the outbreak likely originated from a source within the country. (2018-01-18)
Laser evaporation technology to create new solar materials
Researchers use lasers to blast solutions containing delicate organic compounds to grow new types of crystals for solar cells, light-emitting diodes and photodetectors. (2018-01-03)
Music really is a universal language
Songs serve many different purposes: accompanying a dance, soothing an infant, or expressing love. (2018-01-25)
Researchers offer new evidence on 4-year-old children's knowledge about ecology
What do young children from diverse cultural communities think about the natural world? (2018-01-03)
NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Ava's landfall on Madagascar's coast
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Ava as it made landfall along the coast of northeastern Madagascar. (2018-01-05)
Earth's core and mantle separated in a disorderly fashion
Plumes of hot rock surging upward from the Earth's mantle at volcanic hotspots contain evidence that the Earth's formative years may have been even more chaotic than previously thought, according to new work from a team of Carnegie and Smithsonian scientists published in Nature. (2018-01-24)
NASA study: First direct proof of ozone hole recovery due to chemicals ban
For the first time, scientists have shown through direct satellite observations of the ozone hole that levels of ozone-destroying chlorine are declining, resulting in less ozone depletion. (2018-01-04)
Multiple sclerosis: Cholesterol crystals prevent regeneration in central nervous system
Multiple Sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, in which the immune cells attack myelin sheaths. (2018-01-04)
Simple breathing training with a physiotherapist before surgery prevents postoperative pneumonia
Pneumonia, and other serious lung complications, after major abdominal surgery were halved when patients were seen by a physiotherapist before surgery and taught breathing exercises that the patient needed to start performing immediately on waking from the operation, finds a trial published by The BMJ today. (2018-01-24)
Exploring electrolysis for energy storage
A research team at Kyushu University's International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (I2CNER) developed a flow-type polymer electrolyte cell for power storage. (2018-01-02)
Migraine surgery produces 'dramatic improvements' in functioning, study finds
In addition to reducing headache frequency and severity, surgical treatment for migraine leads to significant improvements in everyday functioning and coping ability, according to a study in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). (2018-01-02)
Tuberculosis drugs work better with vitamin C
Studies in mice and in tissue cultures suggest that giving vitamin C with tuberculosis drugs could reduce the unusually long time it takes these drugs to eradicate this pathogen. (2018-01-03)
Zebrafish study provides new insights into autism spectrum disorder research
Exposure to a compound used to treat migraines and seizures causes characteristics associated with autism, groundbreaking research with zebrafish has demonstrated. (2018-01-24)
First discover the disorder and then find the patients
Biochemists of Bielefeld University have confirmed the cause of initially unclear symptoms of patients in Israel. (2018-01-05)
Study says some nursing homes gaming the system to improve their Medicare star ratings
A new study of nursing homes in California, the nation's largest system, by faculty at Florida Atlantic University and the University of Connecticut, found that some nursing homes inflate their self-assessment reporting to improve their score in the Five-Star Quality Rating System employed by Medicare to help consumers. (2018-01-17)
Alfalfa loss? Annual ryegrass is a win
In the U.S., alfalfa is grown mainly in western and northern states. (2018-01-03)
Impact of inactivity on muscles more severe for older people
According to a recent study published in The Journal of Physiology, researchers have been able to document for the first time how the same period of inactivity has a greater and more severe impact on the muscle power of the lower limbs of the elderly than young people, which is essential for movements like climbing the stairs. (2018-01-04)

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Circular
We're told if the economy is growing, and if we keep producing, that's a good thing. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers explore circular systems that regenerate and re-use what we already have. Guests include economist Kate Raworth, environmental activist Tristram Stuart, landscape architect Kate Orff, entrepreneur David Katz, and graphic designer Jessi Arrington.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#504 The Art of Logic
How can mathematics help us have better arguments? This week we spend the hour with "The Art of Logic in an Illogical World" author, mathematician Eugenia Cheng, as she makes her case that the logic of mathematics can combine with emotional resonance to allow us to have better debates and arguments. Along the way we learn a lot about rigorous logic using arguments you're probably having every day, while also learning a lot about our own underlying beliefs and assumptions.