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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf Archive (July 2018)

Science current events and science news from private research facilities, universities, government agencies and medical centers archive of articles from July, 2018.

Show All Years  •  2018  •  Show All Months (2018)  •  July

Week 26
Sunday July 1, 2018 (8)

Week 27
Monday July 2, 2018 (119)
Tuesday July 3, 2018 (93)
Wednesday July 4, 2018 (53)
Thursday July 5, 2018 (119)
Friday July 6, 2018 (46)
Saturday July 7, 2018 (2)
Sunday July 8, 2018 (4)

Week 28
Monday July 9, 2018 (131)
Tuesday July 10, 2018 (116)
Wednesday July 11, 2018 (121)
Thursday July 12, 2018 (129)
Friday July 13, 2018 (48)
Saturday July 14, 2018 (1)

Week 29
Monday July 16, 2018 (107)
Tuesday July 17, 2018 (84)
Wednesday July 18, 2018 (122)
Thursday July 19, 2018 (113)
Friday July 20, 2018 (38)
Sunday July 22, 2018 (11)

Week 30
Monday July 23, 2018 (134)
Tuesday July 24, 2018 (98)
Wednesday July 25, 2018 (123)
Thursday July 26, 2018 (108)
Friday July 27, 2018 (48)
Saturday July 28, 2018 (2)
Sunday July 29, 2018 (2)

Week 31
Monday July 30, 2018 (107)
Tuesday July 31, 2018 (72)


Top Science Current Events and Science News from July 2018



NIST chip lights up optical neural network demo
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have made a silicon chip that distributes optical signals precisely across a miniature brain-like grid, showcasing a potential new design for neural networks. (2018-07-26)
Sound waves could provide 'liquid biopsies'
Using sound waves, researchers have developed a gentle, contact-free method for separating circulating tumor cells from blood samples that is fast and efficient enough for clinical use. (2018-07-03)
X-ray technology reveals never-before-seen matter around black hole
In an international collaboration between Japan and Sweden, scientists clarified how gravity affects the shape of matter near the black hole in binary system Cygnus X-1. (2018-07-27)
New study shows video games can improve health in children with obesity
A new study from LSU's Pennington Biomedical Research Center showed for the first time that video games, in combination with fitness coaching and a step tracker, helped overweight children lose weight, lower their blood pressure and cholesterol and increase their physical activity. (2018-07-20)
Youth report improved wellbeing as result of tailored mental health services
In a new study, researchers in London, Ontario, partnered with youth receiving care at the First Episode Mood and Anxiety Program at London Health Sciences Centre to better understand personal perspectives on care and treatment outcomes. (2018-07-11)
Writing the future of rewritable memory
Scientists at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada have created the most dense, solid-state memory in history that could soon exceed the capabilities of current hard drives by 1,000 times. (2018-07-23)
Game changing game changes
Using stochastic games to analyze evolution of cooperation, leads to a surprising discovery. (2018-07-10)
Experts address ways to support latest science education standards
The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) are K-12 science content standards, with three dimensions that are integrated in instruction at all levels: core ideas, science and engineering practices, and cross-cutting concepts. (2018-07-18)
Optical fibers that can 'feel' the materials around them
EPFL researchers have developed an optical fiber capable of detecting what sort of material or liquid they have come into contact with. (2018-07-31)
Drug now in clinical trials for Parkinson's strengthens heart contractions in animals
A drug currently in clinical trials for treating symptoms of Parkinson's disease may someday have value for treating heart failure, according to results of early animal studies by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers. (2018-07-20)
Parents who had severe trauma, stresses in childhood more likely to have kids with behavioral health problems
A new study finds that severe childhood trauma and stresses early in parents' lives are linked to higher rates of behavioral health problems in their own children. (2018-07-09)
IBM-EPFL-NJIT team demonstrates novel synaptic architecture for brain inspired computing
Two New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) researchers, working with collaborators from the IBM Research Zurich Laboratory and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, have demonstrated a novel synaptic architecture that could lead to a new class of information processing systems inspired by the brain. (2018-07-10)
Texas A&M AgriLife study shows BPA risk factor for inflammatory bowel disease
A recent study in a preclinical model of inflammatory bowel disease shows dietary exposure to bisphenol-A, or BPA, found in polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, can increase mortality and worsen its symptoms. (2018-07-05)
From pollutants to human health: Key questions for a better environmental future in Europe
A new study, published in the journal Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, wants to shape a new guideline --with a more global and coordinated perspective-- for several social and economic sectors in the field of chemical products and management of environmental risks in Europe. (2018-07-20)
Database analysis more reliable than animal testing for toxic chemicals
Advanced algorithms working from large chemical databases can predict a new chemical's toxicity better than standard animal tests, suggests a study led by scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2018-07-11)
Motivating gamers with personalized game design
A team of multidisciplinary researchers at the University of Waterloo has identified three basic video game player traits that will help to make game design more personalized and more effectively motivate gamers in both entertainment and work applications. (2018-07-09)
Traumatic brain injury biomarker shows promise to support rapid damage evaluation and predict outcomes
A new study in The American Journal of Pathology found that a brain lipid molecule, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), was significantly increased after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a preclinical animal model. (2018-07-16)
Genome editing reduces cholesterol in large animal model, laying human trial groundwork
Using genome editing to inactivate a protein called PCSK9 effectively reduced cholesterol levels in rhesus macaques. (2018-07-09)
The sea anemone, an animal that hides its complexity well
Despite its apparent simplicity -- a tube-like body topped with tentacles -- the sea anemone is actually a highly complex creature. (2018-07-09)
Age and education affect job changes, study finds
New research reveals that people are more likely to change jobs when they are younger and well educated, though not necessarily because they are more open to a new experience. (2018-07-05)
World's first animals caused global warming
The evolution of Earth's first animals more than 500 million years ago caused global warming, new research shows. (2018-07-02)
Army researchers teaching robots to be more reliable teammates for soldiers
Researchers at the US Army Research Laboratory and the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University developed a new technique to quickly teach robots novel traversal behaviors with minimal human oversight. (2018-07-12)
Researchers turn exercise into a game and see encouraging results
A team of University of Iowa researchers built a web-based app called MapTrek. (2018-07-12)
A step closer to quantum computers: NUS researchers show how to directly observe quantum spin effects
A team led by Associate Professor Yang Hyunsoo from the National University of Singapore Faculty of Engineering has found a practical way to observe and examine the quantum effects of electrons in topological insulators and heavy metals. (2018-07-16)
Fern-tastic! Crowdfunded fern genomes published in Nature Plants
With crowdfunded support, researchers have sequenced the first two fern genomes ever. (2018-07-02)
Which strategies help cut consumption of sugary beverages in young children?
An Obesity Reviews analysis of published studies reveals strategies that can successfully reduce the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in young children. (2018-07-18)
Artificial intelligence accurately predicts distribution of radioactive fallout
Researchers at the University of Tokyo Institute of Industrial Science created a machine-learning-based tool that can predict where radioactive emissions from nuclear power plants will disperse. (2018-07-02)
Science fiction enthusiasts have a positive attitude to the digitizing of the brain
The goal of a technology known as mind upload is to make it possible to create functional copies of the human brain on computers. (2018-07-12)
Single-celled architects inspire new nanotechnology
ASU professor Hao Yan and his colleagues have designed a range of nanostructures resembling marine diatoms -- tiny unicellular creatures. (2018-07-16)
Study reveals new geometric shape used by nature to pack cells efficiently
A multinational team of scientists have uncovered a previously undescribed shape -- they call the 'scutoid' -- adopted by epithelial cells during embryonic development that enables the cells to minimize energy use and maximize packing stability. (2018-07-27)
Novel approach to making therapeutic proteins at point of care
A novel approach to making therapeutic proteins allows medicine to be developed in a suitcase-size system. (2018-07-10)
Footwear habits influence child and adolescent motor skill development
Researchers show that children and adolescents who spend most of their time barefoot develop motor skills differently from those who habitually wear shoes. (2018-07-11)
Researchers links coastal nuisance flooding to special type of slow-moving oce
A team of international researchers has found a link between seasonal fluctuations in sea level to a long-time phenomenon -- Rossby Waves. (2018-07-05)
Multivitamins do not promote cardiovascular health
Multivitamins and mineral supplements do not prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiovascular death. (2018-07-10)
Football training may preserve bone health in prostate cancer patients
Androgen deprivation therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer can lead to loss of muscle and bone mass. (2018-07-16)
Artificial intelligence helps Stanford researchers predict drug combinations' side effects
Millions of people take upwards of five medications a day, but testing the side effects of such combinations is impractical. (2018-07-10)
New study pinpoints ways to improve quality of food & nutrition research
In a study published today in PLOS ONE, experts analyzed reams of past food and nutrition research to help identify and spur action in areas where meaningful improvements can be made in the design and execution of future food and nutrition studies. (2018-07-05)
Effect of twice-weekly calorie restriction diet for glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes
A diet with calorie restriction two days per week was comparable to a diet with daily calorie restriction for glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. (2018-07-20)
New system can identify drugs to target 'undruggable' enzymes critical in many diseases
A new drug discovery system allows scientists to specifically target members of an important family of enzymes, called phosphatases, which were previously considered mostly 'undruggable'. (2018-07-26)
nTIDE June 2018 jobs report: downturn in jobs ends trend for americans with disabilities
A modest downturn for June indicated the end of 26 consecutive months of job gains for American with disabilities, according to today's National Trends in Disability Employment -- Monthly Update (nTIDE), issued by Kessler Foundation and the University of New Hampshire's Institute on Disability (UNH-IOD). (2018-07-06)
Houseplants could one day monitor home health
In a perspective published in the July 20 issue of Science, a team of University of Tennessee faculty and a student from two unrelated disciplines -- plant sciences and architectural design -- explore the future of houseplants as aesthetically pleasing and functional sirens of home health. (2018-07-20)
Enabling technology in cell-based therapies: Scale-up, scale-out or program in-place
Technologies that are reducing costs and changing the ways in which researchers and clinicians process and use therapeutic cells are showcased in the August 2018 special issue of SLAS Technology. (2018-07-23)
Training artificial intelligence with artificial X-rays
AI holds real potential for improving both the speed and accuracy of medical diagnostics -- but before clinicians can harness the power of AI to identify conditions in images such as X-rays, they have to 'teach' the algorithms what to look for. (2018-07-06)
Experimental drug reverses hair loss and skin damage linked to fatty diet, shows new study in mice
In a series of experiments with mice, Johns Hopkins investigators have used an experimental compound to successfully reverse hair loss, hair whitening and skin inflammation linked by previous studies to human diets heavy in fat and cholesterol. (2018-07-30)
Experimental drug stops Parkinson's disease progression in mice
Johns Hopkins researchers say they have developed an experimental drug, similar to compounds used to treat diabetes, that slows the progression of Parkinson's disease itself -- as well as its symptoms -- in mice. (2018-07-02)
What psychological science can offer to reducing climate change
The consequences of climate change are immense, and believed by many experts to be largely irreversible (and exponential), causing threats coming from heat waves, flooding, declines in agriculture, and decreasing biodiversity, to name a few. (2018-07-17)
NYSCF researchers develop novel bioengineering technique for personalized bone grafts
Scientists from the New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) Research Institute have developed a new bone engineering technique called Segmental Additive Tissue Engineering (SATE). (2018-07-18)
Cooking oil coating prevents bacteria from growing on food processing equipment
Many foods produced on an industrial scale include raw ingredients mixed together in enormous stainless steel machines that can be difficult to clean. (2018-07-27)
Senolytics improve health, extend life: Preclinical research findings
The presence of senescent or dysfunctional cells can make young mice age faster. (2018-07-09)
Change health messaging to focus on potential impact to help stop the next pandemic
Changing public health messaging to focus on the impact of our actions -- for example the potentially harmful impact of infecting a colleague with a cold, rather than whether we will infect them if we go into work in the first place -- could have significant implications for how we deal with global threats, according to a new study from City University of London, the Oxford Martin School (University of Oxford), and Yale University. (2018-07-09)

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Circular
We're told if the economy is growing, and if we keep producing, that's a good thing. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers explore circular systems that regenerate and re-use what we already have. Guests include economist Kate Raworth, environmental activist Tristram Stuart, landscape architect Kate Orff, entrepreneur David Katz, and graphic designer Jessi Arrington.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#504 The Art of Logic
How can mathematics help us have better arguments? This week we spend the hour with "The Art of Logic in an Illogical World" author, mathematician Eugenia Cheng, as she makes her case that the logic of mathematics can combine with emotional resonance to allow us to have better debates and arguments. Along the way we learn a lot about rigorous logic using arguments you're probably having every day, while also learning a lot about our own underlying beliefs and assumptions.