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Science News Archive | Brightsurf | (July 2020)

Science news and current events archive from July, 2020.

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Week 27
Wednesday July 1, 2020 (117)
Thursday July 2, 2020 (102)
Friday July 3, 2020 (35)
Saturday July 4, 2020 (1)
Sunday July 5, 2020 (11)

Week 28
Monday July 6, 2020 (117)
Tuesday July 7, 2020 (119)
Wednesday July 8, 2020 (131)
Thursday July 9, 2020 (131)
Friday July 10, 2020 (63)
Saturday July 11, 2020 (4)
Sunday July 12, 2020 (9)

Week 29
Monday July 13, 2020 (135)
Tuesday July 14, 2020 (122)
Wednesday July 15, 2020 (133)
Thursday July 16, 2020 (105)
Friday July 17, 2020 (70)
Saturday July 18, 2020 (2)
Sunday July 19, 2020 (6)

Week 30
Monday July 20, 2020 (121)
Tuesday July 21, 2020 (122)
Wednesday July 22, 2020 (127)
Thursday July 23, 2020 (131)
Friday July 24, 2020 (62)
Saturday July 25, 2020 (3)
Sunday July 26, 2020 (8)

Week 31
Monday July 27, 2020 (137)
Tuesday July 28, 2020 (106)
Wednesday July 29, 2020 (132)
Thursday July 30, 2020 (97)
Friday July 31, 2020 (61)


Top Science Current Events and Science News from July 2020



Crystal structure discovered almost 200 years ago could hold key to solar cell revolution
Solar energy researchers are shining their scientific spotlight on materials with a crystal structure discovered nearly two centuries ago. (2020-07-02)
Electrically focus-tuneable ultrathin lens for high-resolution square subpixels
In accordance to rising demand of high-resolution, ultrathin lens device for display panels, the scientists from Korea, UK, and USA have invented an electrically focus-tunable, graphene-based ultrathin subpixel square lens device that demonstrates excellent focusing performance. (2020-07-06)
Milk lipids follow the evolution of mammals
Skoltech scientists conducted a study of milk lipids and described the unique features of human breast milk as compared to bovids, pigs, and closely related primates. (2020-07-07)
Does early access to pension funds improve health?
In a recent study from Singapore, early access to pension wealth was associated with improved health status. (2020-07-08)
Soil studies can be helpful for border control
Underground tunnels have been used by warriors and smugglers for thousands of years to infiltrate battlegrounds and cross borders. (2020-07-08)
NASA analyzes Tropical Cyclone Damien's water vapor concentration
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Cristina in the Eastern Pacific Ocean on July 8, it gathered water vapor data that provided information about the intensity of the storm. (2020-07-08)
Blood-based biomarker can detect, predict severity of traumatic brain injury
A study from the National Institutes of Health confirms that neurofilament light chain as a blood biomarker can detect brain injury and predict recovery in multiple groups, including professional hockey players with acute or chronic concussions and clinic-based patients with mild, moderate, or severe traumatic brain injury. (2020-07-08)
Care for cats? So did people along the Silk Road more than 1,000 years ago
Common domestic cats, as we know them today, might have accompanied Kazakh pastoralists as pets more than 1,000 years ago. (2020-07-09)
Global COVID-19 registry finds strokes associated with COVID-19 are more severe, have worse outcomes and higher mortality
Patients with COVID-19 who have an acute ischemic stroke (AIS) experience more severe strokes, have worse functional outcomes and are more likely to die of stroke than AIS patients who do not have COVID-19. (2020-07-10)
Single-cell RNA sequencing outlines the immune landscape of severe COVID-19
A new single-cell RNA sequencing analysis of more than 59,000 cells from three different patient cohorts provides a detailed look at patients' immune responses to severe cases of COVID-19. (2020-07-10)
Partnerships with health systems can provide support to nursing homes during pandemic
Meaningful partnerships between hospitals and nursing facilities can support better quality of care for people who live in the facilities. (2020-07-13)
Turmeric could have antiviral properties
Curcumin, a natural compound found in the spice turmeric, could help eliminate certain viruses, research has found. (2020-07-17)
Bouncing bubbles shake up emulsion studies
Collisions of tiny air bubbles with water surfaces can reveal fundamental characteristics of foamy mixtures. (2020-07-20)
Mutant zebrafish reveals a turning point in spine's evolution
A chance mutation that led to spinal defects in a zebrafish has opened a little window into our own fishy past. (2020-07-20)
Scientists present pre- and postfusion cryo-em structures of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein
Scientists report two new cryo-EM structures representing the pre- and postfusion conformations of the full-length SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) protein, an essential viral component responsible for host cell entry and the spread of infection. (2020-07-21)
Mammal cells could struggle to fight space germs
The immune systems of mammals - including humans - might struggle to detect and respond to germs from other planets, new research suggests. (2020-07-23)
Potential therapeutic effects of dipyridamole in the severely ill patients with COVID-19
Effective antivirals with safe clinical profile are urgently needed to improve the overall COVID-19 prognosis. (2020-07-26)
Safe work protocols can increase the likelihood the business will fail
There are conflicting predictions on the relationship between worker safety and organization survival. (2020-07-27)
A practicable and reliable therapeutic strategy to treat SARS-CoV-2 infection
In a new study in Cell Discovery, Chen-Yu Zhang's group at Nanjing University and two other groups from Wuhan Institute of Virology and the Second Hospital of Nanjing present a novel finding that absorbed miRNA MIR2911 in honeysuckle decoction (HD) can directly target SARS-CoV-2 genes and inhibit viral replication. (2020-07-28)
Smaller habitats worse than expected for biodiversity
Biodiversity's ongoing global decline has prompted policies to protect and restore habitats to minimize animal and plant extinctions. (2020-07-29)
Investigational breast cancer vaccine plus immune therapy work well in tandem
A vaccine for HER2-positive breast cancers that is being tested in a clinical trial at Duke Cancer Institute is part of an effective, two-drug strategy for enlisting the immune system to fight tumors, according to a Duke-led study in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (2020-07-30)
Copper-catalyzed enantioselective trifluoromethylation of benzylic radicals developed
Scientists from the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have developed the first copper-catalyzed enantioselective trifluoromethylation of benzylic radicals via a copper-catalyzed radical relay strategy. (2020-07-30)
Apgar score effective in assessing health of preterm infants
The vitality of preterm infants should be assessed with an Apgar score, a tool used to measure the health of newborns immediately after birth. (2020-07-02)
A tiny ancient relative of dinosaurs and pterosaurs discovered
Dinosaurs and pterosaurs may be known for their remarkable size, but a newly described species that lived around 237 million years ago suggests that they originated from extremely small ancestors. (2020-07-06)
Artificial tones in perception experiments could be missing the mark, research
Researchers at McMaster University who study how the brain processes sound have discovered the common practice of using artificial tones in perception experiments could mean scientists are overlooking important and interesting discoveries in the field of brain research. (2020-07-07)
Circular RNA makes fruit flies live longer
The molecule influences the insulin signalling pathway and thus prolongs life (2020-07-07)
Cooling mechanism increases solar energy harvesting for self-powered outdoor sensors
Thermoelectric devices, which use the temperature difference between the top and bottom of the device to generate power, offer some promise for harnessing naturally occurring energy. (2020-07-07)
5G networks have few health impacts, Oregon State study using zebrafish model finds
Findings from an Oregon State University study into the effects of radiofrequency radiation generated by the wireless technology that will soon be the standard for cell phones suggest few health impacts. (2020-07-08)
Improved cochlear implant device allows safe MRI in children without discomfort
A study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago found that children with a MED-EL Synchrony cochlear implant device can undergo MRI safely, with no discomfort and reduced need for sedation or anesthesia. (2020-07-09)
Scientists may have found one path to a longer life
Mifepristone appears to extend lifespan in evolutionarily divergent species Drosophila and C. elegans in ways that suggest it may do so in humans, as well. (2020-07-10)
Mothers' paid work suffers during pandemic, study finds
New research from Washington University in St. Louis finds early evidence that the pandemic has exacerbated -- not improved -- the gender gap in work hours, which could have enduring consequences for working mothers. (2020-07-13)
Graphene-Adsorbate van der Waals bonding memory inspires 'smart' graphene sensors
Electric field modulation of the graphene-adsorbate interaction induces unique van der Waals (vdW) bonding which were previously assumed to be randomized by thermal energy after the electric field is turned off. (2020-07-16)
Will telehealth services become the norm following COVID-19 pandemic?
In JAMA Oncology, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center's Trevor Royce, MD, MS, MPH, and his coauthors address whether the routine use of telehealth for patients with cancer could have long-lasting and unforeseen effects on the provision and quality of care. (2020-07-16)
Pine beetles successful no matter how far they roam -- with devastating effects
Whether they travel only a few metres or tens of kilometres to a new host tree, female pine beetles use different strategies to find success--with major negative consequences for pine trees, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. (2020-07-16)
N-doped carbon encapsulated transition metal catalysts to optimize performance of zinc-air batteries
In a report published in NANO, a team of researchers from Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, China have developed N-doped carbon encapsulated transition metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) and oxygen evolution reactions (OER) to optimize performance of zinc-air batteries. (2020-07-17)
How governments resist World Heritage 'in Danger' listings
Some national governments repeatedly resist the placement of 41 UNESCO World Heritage sites on the World Heritage in Danger list. (2020-07-20)
Recycling Japanese liquor leftovers as animal feed produces happier pigs and tastier pork
Tastier pork comes from pigs that eat the barley left over after making the Japanese liquor shochu. (2020-07-21)
How does ridesourcing substitute for public transit network?
Researchers at Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) used ridesourcing data from Chengdu, China to investigate the relationship between ridesourcing and public transit. (2020-07-21)
Skin cancer treatments could be used to treat other forms of the disease
The creation of a silica nanocapsule could allow treatments that use light to destroy cancerous or precancerous cells in the skin to also be used to treat other types of cancer. (2020-07-21)
Fear of COVID-2019: Emerging cardiac risk
Fear of COVID-19 is an issue stopping patients from accessing needed cardiac care and methods to ameliorate negative outcomes. (2020-07-22)
CIC nanoGUNE reaches new depths in infrared nanospectroscopy
Researchers from the Nanooptics Group at CIC nanoGUNE (San Sebastian) demonstrate that nanoscale infrared imaging - which is established as a surface-sensitive technique - can be employed for chemical nanoidentification of materials that are located up to 100 nm below the surface. (2020-07-23)
Dual role discovered for molecule involved in autoimmune eye disease
The inflammatory molecule interleukin-17A (IL-17A) triggers immune cells that in turn reduce IL-17A's pro-inflammatory activity, according to a study by National Eye Institute (NEI) researchers. (2020-07-23)
Brazilian researchers develop an optical fiber made of gel derived from marine algae
Edible, biocompatible and biodegradable, these fibers have potential for various medical applications. (2020-07-24)
Soft robot actuators heal themselves
Repeated activity wears on soft robotic actuators, but these machine's moving parts need to be reliable and easily fixed. (2020-07-27)
Study seeks to explain decline in hip fracture rates
In a paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine today, researchers showed how analysis of data from the multigenerational Framingham Osteoporosis Study may in part explain why the incidence of hip fracture in the US has declined during the last two decades. (2020-07-27)
New scenario for the India-Asia collision dynamics
The India-Asia collision is an outstanding smoking gun in the study of continental collision dynamics. (2020-07-28)
Biphilic surfaces reduce defrosting times in heat exchangers
Miljkovic, along with researchers in his group, have discovered a way to significantly improve the defrosting of ice and frost on heat exchangers. (2020-07-29)
How a crystalline sponge sheds water molecules
How does water leave a sponge? In a new study, scientists answer this question in detail for a porous, crystalline material made from metal and organic building blocks -- specifically, cobalt(II) sulfate heptahydrate, 5-aminoisophthalic acid and 4,4'-bipyridine. (2020-07-29)
Major depressive episodes far more common than previously believed, new Yale study finds
The number of adults in the United States who suffer from major depressive episodes at some point in their life is far higher than previously believed, a new study by the Yale School of Public Health finds. (2020-07-30)
National Academies publishes guide to help public officials make sense of COVID-19 data
The National Academies has published a guide to help officials across the country interpret and understand different COVID-19 statistics and data sources as they make decisions about opening and closing schools, businesses and community facilities. (2020-07-30)

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