Brightsurf Science News & Current Events Archive (June 2018)

Science news and science current events archive June, 2018.

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Top Science News & Current Event Articles from June 2018

JAK inhibitors associated with aggressive lymphoma
Austrian researchers have discovered that a small number of patients taking targeted drugs known as Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors to treat myelofibrosis may develop aggressive lymphomas.

Wearable defibrillators may be an alternative to surgically implanted device for children with certain heart rhythm disorders
Study finds external wearable defibrillators are safe and effective in children with ventricular heart rhythm disorders that put them at risk for sudden cardiac death. The wearable devices may provide a reliable alternative to surgically implanted defibrillators in patients who cannot have surgically placed devices or who do not need them long term.

Healthy lifestyle smartphone app slows artery aging
Using a healthy lifestyle smartphone application helps to slow artery ageing, according to results from the EVIDENT II trial presented today at EuroHeartCare 2018, the European Society of Cardiology's annual nursing congress.

Cooling by laser beam
A laser pulse that for a few picoseconds transforms a material into a high-temperature superconductor. Different experiments have unveiled this interesting phenomenon, with potential applicative implications. Research carried out by SISSA scientists a year ago had already provided several basic principles of the phenomenon. A new study published on

Novel microplate 3D bioprinting platform for muscle & tendon tissue engineering
New research describes the development of a novel screening platform with automated production of 3D muscle- and tendon-like tissues using 3D bioprinting.

New 3D imaging analysis technique could lead to improved arthritis treatment
An algorithm to monitor the joints of patients with arthritis, which could change the way that the severity of the condition is assessed, has been developed by a team of engineers, physicians and radiologists led by the University of Cambridge.

A laser that smells like a hound
University of Adelaide researchers have created a laser that can 'smell' different gases within a sample. Applications for the new device lie not just in environmental monitoring and detecting industrial contamination, but may eventually be used to diagnose disease by 'smelling' the breath.

New technology enables man to hold his granddaughter again
In the first known study of how amputees use advanced sensory-enabled prostheses outside the lab, subjects used a mechanical hand more regularly and for longer periods of time compared to traditional prostheses--and also reported a greater sense of psychosocial well-being. The study also asserts that sensory feedback fundamentally changed how the study participants used their mechanical attachment, ''transforming it from a sporadically used tool into a readily and frequently used 'hand.'''

'Workhorse' lithium battery could be more powerful thanks to new design
Cornell University chemical engineering professor Lynden Archer believes there needs to be a battery technology 'revolution' -- and thinks that his lab has fired one of the first shots.

Health insurance plans may be fueling opioid epidemic
Health care insurers including Medicare, Medicaid and major private insurers have not done enough to combat the opioid epidemic, suggests a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

'Smart stent' detects narrowing of arteries
UBC researchers have developed a type of 'smart stent' that monitors even subtle changes in the flow of blood through the artery, detecting the narrowing in its earliest stages and making early diagnosis and treatment possible.

Writing away the body image blues
Body dissatisfaction among women is widespread and can lead to a number of worrisome outcomes, including eating disorders, depression and anxiety. While researchers know a lot about what makes women's body image worse, they are still short on empirically supported interventions for improving women's body image. Northwestern psychology professor Renee Engeln tested the effect of three specific writing exercises on college women's body satisfaction, along with co-author Natalie G. Stern.

Bacteriophages: Are they an overlooked driver of Parkinson's disease?
In the first study of its kind, researchers from the New York-based Human Microbiology Institute have discovered the role certain bacteriophages may play in the onset of Parkinson's disease (PD). The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga.

Long-term IMPACT data find improved survival when targeted therapies matched to tumor-specific gene mutations
Matching targeted therapies to tumor-specific gene mutations across tumor types improved progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced disease relative to those receiving non-matched treatment (NMT), according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The researchers also found that receiving matched targeted therapy (MTT) was an independent factor for predicting longer OS.

Collaborative model for post-disaster behavioral health recovery may serve as standard
Faculty in LSU Health New Orleans schools of Medicine and Public Health and colleagues report that a collaborative effort to build capacity to address behavioral health and promote community resilience after the 2016 Great Flood in Baton Rouge, LA successfully expanded local behavioral health services delivery capacity and that the model may be useful to other disaster-struck communities.

Toxicant levels up to 99 percent less in myblu™ aerosols compared to cigarette smoke
A new aerosol chemistry study presented at the 1st Scientific Summit -- Tobacco Harm Reduction: Novel products, Research & Policy, has revealed toxicant levels in myblu pod-system e-cigarette aerosols are up to 99 percent lower than in cigarette smoke.

True nature of cells blamed in Alzheimer's revealed
Immune cells commonly blamed in Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases are actually precision cleaning machines protecting the central nervous system, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine shows.

Putting animals in their best light -- USC researchers find some shades of LED lamps threaten wildlife
A USC research team identifies harmful effects to wildlife as LED lights proliferate. Some hues, including blues and whites, imperil creatures while other wavelengths are more benign. They devised an interactive web-based tool to help people make wildlife-friendly choices in outdoor lighting.

UTMN scientists confirm the high speed of Siberia development
Following the trail of Siberian pioneers, archaeologists from the University of Tyumen have investigated the camp on Karachinsky Island, the Lower Tobol River, where, according to chronicles, Yermak and his Cossacks spent a winter. The AMS Laboratory at the University of Arizona analysed wood samples and dated the found dugout to the middle of the 17th century, while Yermak's campaign took place in the years 1581-1585.

Using envy as a marketing tool can backfire
For decades, marketers have used envy to sell, attempting to cash in on consumers' desire to want what others have. But does it actually work? According to a new study from the UBC Sauder School of Business, employing envy can boost brands but it can also completely backfire -- and it depends on a consumer's self-esteem.

African-Americans still disproportionately affected by HIV
African-Americans are still much more likely to be diagnosed with HIV than white Americans. A new paper on the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the African-American community shows that despite recent drops in HIV diagnoses across every population in the US, there are still great disparities between ethnic groups. The paper was led by Cato T. Laurencin of the University of Connecticut in the US and is published in Springer's Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities.

Blood test shows potential for early detection of lung cancer
A test that analyzes free-floating DNA in the blood may be able to detect early-stage lung cancer, a preliminary report from the ongoing Circulating Cell-Free Genome Atlas (CCGA) study suggests.

Risk of autism increased in children of mothers with diabetes
The risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was increased in children of mothers with the three main types of diabetes that complicate pregnancy, findings that add new information on type 1 diabetes and extend what is already known about type 2 and gestational diabetes.

Blood test predicts spastic cerebral palsy
Researchers at Nemours and the University of Delaware have developed a blood test predictive of spastic cerebral palsy. Their study, published in BMC Bioinformatics, showed that DNA patterns in circulating blood cells can be used to help identify spastic CP patients (Crowgey et al.). New and better ways to identify infants with CP are needed so that interventions can start earlier for more children.

Nature: Tricky feat with stand-up molecule
Scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich have achieved a new level of precision working with single molecules. They succeeded in placing an ultrathin molecule in an upright position on a flat layer of silver atoms -- and the molecule remained standing instead of reverting to its naturally favoured position. The artificial structure described in Nature illustrates the potential of novel molecular fabrication methods.

Mobile health technology can potentially transform how patients manage heart disease risk
Mobile health technology has the potential to transform the way we prevent and manage heart disease, but there are unanswered questions about how to optimize this technology and maintain engagement with patients, according to a review of randomized clinical trials published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.

New 'promiscuous' enzyme helps turn plant waste into sustainable products
A new family of enzymes has been discovered which paves the way to convert plant waste into sustainable and high-value products such as nylon, plastics, chemicals, and fuels.

Scientists, students to make first live, interactive broadcasts from Arctic Ocean's Northwest Passage
A team of scientists and students, conducting research aboard the R/V Akademik Ioffe, will offer select museums, as well as classrooms and citizen scientists worldwide, an opportunity to explore with them in real time a dramatically changing Arctic Ocean, and to discuss their research in the first-ever live, interactive broadcasts from the fabled Northwest Passage.

Football training in school greatly improves girls' fitness and health
Schoolgirls can achieve lower blood pressure, stronger muscles, better balance and improved jumping performance if their school puts football training on the timetable -- including girls who have never played football before. This is the finding of a study of the FIFA 11 for Health in Europe exercise concept in Faroese schoolchildren carried out by football researchers at the University of Southern Denmark, Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics.

Increase in lifestyle-related cancers over past decade spotlights need for prevention
Lifestyle-related cancers, such as lung, colorectal, and skin cancers, have increased globally over the past decade, according to the most comprehensive analysis of cancer-related health outcomes and patterns ever conducted.

Mars exhumes methane on a seasonal cycle, Curiosity reveals; rover also detects ancient organic matter
Data from the Curiosity rover, part of two separate studies, furthers scientists' understanding of methane on Mars -- suggesting some of it may be trapped in water-based crystals -- and identifies additional carbon-bearing molecules, central to understanding processes and conditions on the planet.

Proxies who watch advanced care planning video more likely to withhold feeding tubes
Researchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research (IFAR) and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have discovered that nursing home residents with advanced dementia are more likely to have advance directives that indicate they did should not get feeding tubes after their proxies viewed a 12-minute video on advance care planning.

Individual access to genomic disease risk factors has a beneficial impact on lifestyles
A large study from Finland shows that giving personal genomic information to individuals can have a long-term beneficial effect on their lifestyles.

Sleep health and yoga intervention delivered in low-income communities improves sleep
Pilot study results indicate that a sleep and yoga intervention has promising effects on improving sleep disturbance, sleep-related impairment, and sleep health behaviors.

Low-cost plastic sensors could monitor a range of health conditions
An international team of researchers have developed a low-cost sensor made from semiconducting plastic that can be used to diagnose or monitor a wide range of health conditions, such as surgical complications or neurodegenerative diseases.

First study of neoadjuvant use of PARP inhibitor shows promise for early-stage, BRCA+ breast cancer patients
In a small Phase II study of early-stage breast cancer patients with BRCA1/2 mutations, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found that more than half of the women who took the PARP inhibitor talazoparib once daily prior to surgery had no evidence of disease at the time of surgery. If further validated in larger, confirmatory trials, the oral medication could replace chemotherapy for these patients.

Different outdoor professions carry different risks for skin cancer
One of the main risk factors for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the most common cancer worldwide, is solar ultraviolet radiation.

Infrared NASA imagery shows Hurricane Aletta strengthening
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Aletta in the Eastern Pacific Ocean it had just become the first hurricane of the season. Infrared imagery showed that Aletta appeared more organized. The National Hurricane Center noted that Aletta could become a Category 4 hurricane later on June 8.

Virtual reality technology transforming cardiovascular medicine
Rapid advancements in the field of virtual reality are leading to new developments in cardiovascular treatment and improved outcomes for patients, according to a review paper published today in JACC: Basic to Translational Science. Extended reality applications in cardiac care include education and training, pre-procedural planning, visualization during a procedure and rehabilitation in post-stroke patients.

Study: Exercise mitigates genetic effects of obesity later in life
A new study suggests, for the first time in women over age 70, that working up a sweat can reduce the influence one's genes have on obesity.

A common electronic language for magnetic resonance
The standards used to re-transcribed the collected data in organic chemistry is however specific to each laboratory, making it difficult to export the information electronically. An international team headed by chemists from UNIGE has developed a new common electronic language around two main features: it translates the data of each molecule in exactly the same way and makes it simple to export it from one information system to another.

Jurassic diet: Why our knowledge of what ancient pterosaurs ate might be wrong
Research reveals knowledge of prehistoric diets is often based on outdated ideas and could be inaccurate.

Study links content of service members' art to their trauma levels
A new study conducted at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence found that military service members recovering from PTSD who still identified as a member of a unit have lower levels of psychological injuries.

Novel transmitter protects wireless devices from hackers
MIT researchers have developed a novel transmitter that frequency hops each individual 1 or 0 bit of a data packet, every microsecond, which is fast enough to thwart even the quickest hackers.

Broken shuttle may interfere with learning in major brain disorders
A broken shuttle protein may hinder learning in people with intellectual disability, schizophrenia, or autism.

DNA barcodes that reliably work: A game-changer for biomedical research
Researchers have developed a new method for correcting the errors that creep into DNA barcodes -- labels used in a wide range of biological experiments -- yielding far more accurate results and paving the way for more ambitious medical research in the future.

First malaria-human contact mapped with Nobel Prize-winning technology
Melbourne scientists have taken a significant step toward developing a new vaccine for malaria, revealing for the first time an 'atomic-scale' blueprint of how the parasite invades human cells. Using the Nobel Prize-winning technology cryo-EM (cryo-electron microscopy), the researchers mapped the previously hidden first contact between Plasmodium vivax malaria parasites and young red blood cells they invade to begin the parasites' spread throughout the body. The discovery was published today in Nature.

First public forecasts from ViEWS, a political Violence Early-Warning System
The challenges of preventing, mitigating, and adapting to largescale political violence are daunting, particularly when violence escalates where it is not expected. With funding from the European Research Council, ViEWS: a political Violence Early-Warning System at Uppsala University, is developing a system that is rigorous, data-based, and publicly available to researchers and the international community. On 7 June, ViEWS released its first public forecasts for Africa.

FASEB Journal: Caloric intake and muscle mass at high altitude
New research in The FASEB Journal explored why a group of young, healthy adults residing at high altitude lost muscle mass while severely underfed and consuming the same high-protein diet that preserved muscle during weight loss at sea level.

How much is wildlife tourism affecting the animals it targets?
A new study in Conservation Physiology, published by Oxford University Press, reveals that white shark activity increases dramatically when the animals are interacting with cage-diving operators.

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