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Science News Archive | Brightsurf | (March 2019)

Science news and current events archive from March, 2019.

Show All Years  •  2019  •  Show All Months (2019)  •  March

Week 09
Friday March 1, 2019 (56)
Saturday March 2, 2019 (2)
Sunday March 3, 2019 (8)

Week 10
Monday March 4, 2019 (143)
Tuesday March 5, 2019 (94)
Wednesday March 6, 2019 (130)
Thursday March 7, 2019 (118)
Friday March 8, 2019 (52)
Sunday March 10, 2019 (5)

Week 11
Monday March 11, 2019 (116)
Tuesday March 12, 2019 (123)
Wednesday March 13, 2019 (110)
Thursday March 14, 2019 (118)
Friday March 15, 2019 (53)
Saturday March 16, 2019 (11)
Sunday March 17, 2019 (19)

Week 12
Monday March 18, 2019 (120)
Tuesday March 19, 2019 (106)
Wednesday March 20, 2019 (125)
Thursday March 21, 2019 (124)
Friday March 22, 2019 (54)
Saturday March 23, 2019 (21)
Sunday March 24, 2019 (21)

Week 13
Monday March 25, 2019 (144)
Tuesday March 26, 2019 (103)
Wednesday March 27, 2019 (125)
Thursday March 28, 2019 (122)
Friday March 29, 2019 (66)
Saturday March 30, 2019 (1)
Sunday March 31, 2019 (12)


Top Science Current Events and Science News from March 2019



Eating the flu
Given the importance and wide distribution of Influenza A viruses, it is surprising how little is known about infections of wild mammals. (2019-03-06)
Insect food webs
Biological diversity stabilizes species interactions. (2019-03-06)
One among many
Anyone moving in a large crowd, absorbed in their phone and yet avoiding collisions, follows certain laws that they themselves create. (2019-03-12)
Sources and sinks
For the entire history of our species, humans have lived on a planet capped by a chunk of ice at each pole. (2019-03-14)
Sensing shakes
Every year earthquakes worldwide claim hundreds or even thousands of lives. (2019-03-10)
Copying made easy
Whether revealing a perpetrator with DNA evidence, diagnosing a pathogen, classifying a paleontological discovery, or determining paternity, the duplication of nucleic acids (amplification) is indispensable. (2019-03-12)
BJC press notice
Please contact the BJC press office for the full paper or with any other questions on 0203 469 8300, out of hours, 07050 264 059 or bjcpress@cancer.org.uk. (2019-03-19)
Robotic 'gray goo'
Researchers at Columbia Engineering and MIT Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), demonstrate for the first time a way to make a robot composed of many loosely coupled components, or 'particles.' Unlike swarm or modular robots, each component is simple, and has no individual address or identity. (2019-03-20)
A varied menu
Freiburg biologists have analyzed in detail for the first time which animals are captured by the carnivorous waterwheel plant (2019-03-25)
Nature hits rewind
The study of evolution is revealing new complexities, showing how the traits most beneficial to the fitness of individual plants and animals are not always the ones we see in nature. (2019-03-19)
Discovery of a crucial immune reaction when solid food is introduced that prevents inflammatory disorders
In newborn infants, gut microbiota is first conditioned by breast milk components. (2019-03-19)
A laser technique proves effective to recover material designed to protect industrial products
The system has been validated for non-stick and anticorrosive coatings used in the manufacturing of a wide range of objects from car engines to kitchen utensils. (2019-03-18)
Number and timing of pregnancies influence breast cancer risk for women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation
Researchers confirm the lower risk of breast cancer from multiple pregnancies and from breast feeding seen in average risk women extends to those at the highest risk of breast cancer, according to the largest prospective study of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations carriers to date. (2019-03-08)
Mowing for monarchs
You might think that mowing fields wouldn't benefit monarch butterfly populations. (2019-03-12)
Proofs of parallel evolution between cognition, tool development, and social complexity
A study led by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) has used eye-tracking techniques to analyse the processes of selective attention that determine the way in which we explore and interact with our environment. (2019-03-08)
Seafood mislabeling rate less than 1 percent for products with MSC ecolabel vs. global average of 30 percent
DNA barcoding of more than 1,400 Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) labelled products has shown that less than 1 percent were mislabeled, compared with a reported average global seafood mislabeling rate of 30 percent. (2019-03-18)
Health insurance associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease among aging immigrants
Aging immigrants' risk for cardiovascular disease may be heightened by their lack of health insurance, particularly among those who recently arrived in the United States, finds a study led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. (2019-03-19)
A Georgia State cybersecurity study of the dark web exposes vulnerability to machine identities
A thriving marketplace for SSL and TLS certificates -- small data files used to facilitate confidential communication between organizations' servers and their clients' computers -- exists on a hidden part of the Internet, according to new research by Georgia State University's Evidence-Based Cybersecurity Research Group (EBCS) and the University of Surrey. (2019-03-08)
Child's elevated mental ill-health risk if mother treated for infection during pregnancy
Risks for autism and depression are higher if one's mother was in hospital with an infection during pregnancy. (2019-03-07)
Academic performance of urban children with asthma worse than peers without asthma
A new study published in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology shows urban children with poorly controlled asthma, particularly those who are ethnic minorities, also suffer academically. (2019-03-11)
India's stubble burning air pollution causes USD 30 billion economic losses, health risks
India's air pollution made headlines around the globe last year. (2019-03-04)
MD Anderson study may explain why immunotherapy not effective for some patients with metastatic melanoma and kidney cancer
White blood cells known as B cells have been shown to be effective for predicting which cancer patients will respond to immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) therapy, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. (2019-03-25)
The moiré patterns of three layers change the electronic properties of graphene
Combining an atomically thin graphene and a boron nitride layer at a slightly rotated angle changes their electrical properties. (2019-03-08)
Study in mice examines impact of reused cooking oil on breast cancer progression
New study in mice by University of Illinois researchers finds that the compounds in thermally abused cooking oils may trigger genetic, biochemical changes that hasten the progression of late-stage breast cancer, promoting tumor cells' growth and proliferation. (2019-03-21)
Alzheimer's: How does the brain change over the course of the disease?
What changes in the brain are caused by Alzheimer's disease? (2019-03-08)
Gene identified that increases risk of antibiotic reaction
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and colleagues have identified a gene that increases the risk for a severe and potentially life-threatening reaction to the commonly prescribed antibiotic vancomycin. (2019-03-08)
Artificial intelligence speeds up!
A group at Politecnico di Milano has developed an electronic circuit able to solve a system of linear equations in a single operation in the timescale of few tens of ns. (2019-03-15)
Research into aphasia reveals new interactions between language and thought
Knowledge of the facts is called factive knowledge. In the phrase 'He knows [that it is warm outside]', the embedded clause is assumed to be true. (2019-03-18)
Mental health issues increased significantly in young adults over last decade
The percentage of young Americans experiencing certain types of mental health disorders has risen significantly over the past decade, with no corresponding increase in older adults, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2019-03-14)
Testosterone slows prostate cancer recurrence in low-risk patients
In the largest such study so far undertaken, US researchers have shown that testosterone replacement slows the recurrence of prostate cancer in low-risk patients. (2019-03-16)
Underwater surveys in Emerald Bay reveal the nature and activity of Lake Tahoe faults
Emerald Bay, California, a beautiful location on the southwestern shore of Lake Tahoe, is surrounded by rugged landscape, including rocky cliffs and remnants of mountain glaciers. (2019-03-19)
New gene hunt reveals potential breast cancer treatment target
Australian and US researchers have developed a way to discover elusive cancer-promoting genes, already identifying one that appears to promote aggressive breast cancers. (2019-03-08)
The chemistry behind kibble (video)
Have you ever thought about how strange it is that dogs eat these dry, weird-smelling bits of food for their entire lives and never get sick of them? (2019-03-08)
New method of scoring protein interactions mines large data sets from a fresh angle
Researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have created a novel way to define individual protein associations in a quick, efficient, and informative way. (2019-03-08)
Canadians' consumption of fruit and vegetables drops 13 per cent in 11 years
Two surveys taken 11 years apart show a 13-per-cent decrease in the amount of fruit and vegetables being consumed by Canadians, new University of British Columbia research has found. (2019-03-08)
Researchers look to nature to unearth the secrets of cyclic imine cleavage
University of Tsukuba researchers have shown that enzymes can degrade cyclic imines. (2019-03-07)
At what age do you feel 65?
At what age do you feel 65? New study reveals wide variations in how well or poorly people age. (2019-03-08)
Design and validation of world-class multilayered thermal emitter using machine learning
NIMS, the University of Tokyo, Niigata University and RIKEN jointly designed a multilayered metamaterial that realizes ultra-narrowband wavelength-selective thermal emission by combining the machine learning (Bayesian optimization) and thermal emission properties calculations (electromagnetic calculation). (2019-03-15)
Smokers often misunderstand health risks of smokeless tobacco product, Rutgers study finds
American smokers mistakenly think that using snus, a type of moist snuff smokeless tobacco product, is as dangerous as smoking tobacco, according to a Rutgers study. (2019-03-04)
Colorectal cancer in patients with early onset is distinct from that in older patients
New research indicates that colorectal cancer diagnosed at an early age has clinical and genetic features that are different from those seen in traditional colorectal cancer diagnosed later in life. (2019-03-11)
Kids' concussion recovery like snakes and ladders game
During the first 24 hours, home and leisure activities may be undertaken as long as they are only for five minutes at a time, and stopped if symptoms increase. (2019-03-11)
Novel sleep index, wakefulness may predict if patients able to breathe on their own
Critically ill patients are more likely to be successfully weaned from a mechanical ventilator, or breathing machine, if they have higher levels of wakefulness and both their right and left brains experience the same depth of sleep, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2019-03-01)
Atmospheric scientists reveal the effect of sea-ice loss on Arctic warming
Analyses indicate that Arctic amplification would not slow down until the 22nd and 23rd centuries. (2019-03-08)
Air pollution may impact fetal cardiovascular system, Rutgers study says
Microscopic particles in air pollution inhaled by pregnant women may damage fetal cardiovascular development, according to a study by Rutgers researchers. (2019-03-11)
Fountain of youth for heart health may lie in the gut
As our collection of resident gut bacteria changes with age, it increasingly produces harmful metabolites that damage veins and blood vessels, driving disease, a new study suggests (2019-03-19)
Steroid use during cardiac bypass surgery did not reduce risk of severe kidney injury
Using steroids during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery did not reduce the risk of acute kidney injury in people at increased risk of death, according to a study conducted in 18 countries published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-03-04)
THOR wrangles complex microbiomes into a model for improving them
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin developed a community they named THOR, three species of bacteria isolated from soybean roots and grown together. (2019-03-08)
A peek into lymph nodes
The vast majority of cancer deaths occur due to the spread of cancer from one organ to another, which can happen either through the blood or the lymphatic system. (2019-03-14)
Two papers describe how a membrane protein can move both lipids and ions
The TMEM16 family of membrane proteins was hailed as representing the elusive calcium-activated chloride channels. (2019-03-12)
Mental health state associated with higher death rates for prostate and urological cancers
Patients with prostate, bladder or kidney cancers are at greater risk of dying if they have had psychiatric care prior to the cancer treatment. (2019-03-17)

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#541 Wayfinding
These days when we want to know where we are or how to get where we want to go, most of us will pull out a smart phone with a built-in GPS and map app. Some of us old timers might still use an old school paper map from time to time. But we didn't always used to lean so heavily on maps and technology, and in some remote places of the world some people still navigate and wayfind their way without the aid of these tools... and in some cases do better without them. This week, host Rachelle Saunders...
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.