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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 11, 1996


Race Plus Roaches: A Breathtaking Link
African-Americans are far more likely than Caucasians to develop asthma linked to cockroach sensitivity, according to research from the Johns Hopkins Children's Center
X-ray Galaxy Clusters Evolve On CTC's SP
Scientists have successfully modeled the evolution of a massive cluster of X-ray galaxies using the 512 processor IBM SP at the Cornell Theory Center.
Transgenic Rice Plants Resist Insects, Drought And Salt Damage
Biologists at Cornell and Washington universities have genetically engineered and successfully field tested rice plants that resist some of the most destructive insects as well as salt and drought damage.
In Search Of The Perfect Bluefin, Cornell Anthropologist's Tokyomarket Studies Foster East-West Understanding
When Theodore C. Bestor haunts the wharves of New England and the Tsukiji Wholesale Seafood Market in Tokyo, he's not just looking for really fresh fish.

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Uncounted
First things first: our very own Latif Nasser has an exciting new show on Netflix. He talks to Jad about the hidden forces of the world that connect us all. Then, with an eye on the upcoming election, we take a look back: at two pieces from More Perfect Season 3 about Constitutional amendments that determine who gets to vote. Former Radiolab producer Julia Longoria takes us to Washington, D.C. The capital is at the heart of our democracy, but it's not a state, and it wasn't until the 23rd Amendment that its people got the right to vote for president. But that still left DC without full representation in Congress; D.C. sends a "non-voting delegate" to the House. Julia profiles that delegate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, and her unique approach to fighting for power in a virtually powerless role. Second, Radiolab producer Sarah Qari looks at a current fight to lower the US voting age to 16 that harkens back to the fight for the 26th Amendment in the 1960s. Eighteen-year-olds at the time argued that if they were old enough to be drafted to fight in the War, they were old enough to have a voice in our democracy. But what about today, when even younger Americans are finding themselves at the center of national political debates? Does it mean we should lower the voting age even further? This episode was reported and produced by Julia Longoria and Sarah Qari. Check out Latif Nasser's new Netflix show Connected here. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.