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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | August 26, 1997


Targeting Gene Therapy To Specific Cells: Technique Opens Door To Prevention Of Restenosis After Angioplasty
University of Chicago researchers have developed the first practical method to limit activity of therapeutic genes to a specific cell type (smooth muscle cells), clearing a major safety hurdle facing gene therapy.
Burning Out Tissue Cuts Need For "Shocking" Racing Heart By Implanted Defibrillator
Burning out damaged heart tissue through a procedure called ablation sharply reduces the number of shocks delivered by implantable defibrillator to slow down racing hearts, a new study reports in today's American Heart Association journal Circulation.
Role Of Cytokines In Treating Heart Disease Unveiled By Penn Scientists
University of Pennsylvania Medical Center researchers are investigating the role of cytokines in explaining the effectiveness of amlodipine, a widely prescribed calcium- channel blocker for patients with heart failure.
Motivating Math: Helping 'Kids' Discover Math
An innovative approach to math education, developed at the Weizmann Institute, featured on the cover of the Sept.
Female Fireflies Lure Males For Defense Chemical
The characteristic light flashes that summon male fireflies of the genus Photinus could come from female Photinus fireflies.
Dental Health, Chronic Infections Double Brain Attack Risk
Dental infections and other chronic infections such as bronchitis more than double the risk of having a stroke or
Duke Scientist Discovers Cell Structure Guide Potent, Reproductive Stem Cells
In a discovery that may help answer the riddle of how an amorphous sac of stem cells in testes gives rise to sperm, Duke scientists have found a cell component that appears to guide potent reproductive cells to both self-renew and make mature differentiated cells.
Children Who Breathe Second-Hand Smoke At Home Have Lower Levels Of "Good" Cholesterol, Study Finds
Children already in danger of developing heart disease because of high cholesterol blood levels face a
Nurse Home Visits Have Lasting Positive Effects
In a 15-year follow-up of nurse home visit program, University of Colorado/Cornell researchers find enduring benefits, including less use of welfare, less child abuse and fewer criminal problems.
New Survey: Influx Of Hispanics Displeases Some State Residents
North Carolinians have mixed emotions about Hispanics migrating to the state, according to a new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill survey.

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