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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | December 07, 1998


Radiation Belts Around Earth Adversly Affecting Satellites
Much of the energetic electron activity in Earth's radiation belts, once thought to be generated by the sun and solar wind, actually is accelerated to light-speed by Earth's own magnetic shell, creating periodic havoc with satellites.
UC Scientists Search For Alternatives For Methyl Bromide
Methyl bromide solves an array of problems for farmers. When American usage of the chemical is banned in 2004, this extremely effective broad-spectrum pesticide will be replaced with a variety of alternatives.
Old Growth Forests May Shed Light On Worldwide Greenhouse Effect
Michigan Tech researchers are studying ecosystem responses to global climate change in old growth forests in an attempt to find a part of the solution to the greenhouse effect problem.
People Who Are Diabetic And Glucose Intolerant Can Benefit From "Statin" Drug Therapy, Even If Cholesterol Levels Are Normal
A cholesterol-lowering drug may help reduce the risk of another heart attack and the need for artery-opening procedures in people with diabetes and heart disease who have average blood levels of cholesterol.
Promising New Drug Uses Antibody Targeted Chemotherapy To Fight Leukemia
Scientists presented data today at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) meeting, how a new experimental compound, known as CMA-676, uses an antibody connected to chemotherapy molecules to help patients fight a virulent and often fatal form of cancer - acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).
Columbia Researchers Synthesize Compound With Possible Link To MacularDegeneration; Work Is Critical To Pinpointing Causes Of Disease, Scientists Say
Researchers at Columbia University have synthesized large quantities of a vitamin A derivative that accumulates in human eyes and may contribute to age-related macular degeneration.
Vroom Vroom 'Shrooms: UC Davis Seeks Prostate Cancer Patients For Trial Of Shiitake Extract
Investigators at UC Davis Cancer Center are studying a nutritional supplement derived from shitake mushrooms to see if can reduce tumor activity in men with prostate cancer The six-month pilot study is the first US trial of a substance known as activated hexose containing compound.
Genetically Engineered Mice Exhibit Anxiety, Offering Insight Into Role Of Serotonin In Brain
Researchers led by a UC San Francisco investigator have genetically altered the serotonin brain system of mice, producing animals that exhibit anxiety, thereby offering an important new model for exploring the way in which the serotonin brain system contributes to anxiety in humans.
Vital Statistics Point To Encouraging Trends
An all-time high in life expectancy, a new low in the national infant mortality rate, and a sixth straight yearly decline in teen pregnancy rates were among the positive U.S. health trends cited in the latest Annual Summary of Vital Statistics published in the December issue of Pediatrics.
Clinical Trial Demonstrates Experimental Growth Factor Increases Eligibility For Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation
A multi-institutional clinical trial that included a UC San Francisco researcher indicates that use of an experimental drug known as TPO increases the number of people who are medically eligible for autologous stem cell transplantation, a procedure used to replenish the blood cells of cancer patients following high dose chemotherapy.
Winter Science: New Permafrost Data Suggests Implications For Climate-Change Predictions, UD Prof Says
When Jack Frost nips at your nose, consider this: Perennially frozen material lurks beneath as much as one-fourth of the Earth's land surface.
Research Grant To Wistar Institute Involves Linda Creed Breast Cancer Foundation In Breast Cancer Research
For the second year in a row, the Linda Creed Breast Cancer Foundation has awarded a grant to Dr.
PAHO To Provide $1 Million For Cholera Programs In Central America
The Central American Ministers of Health have agreed to put into place emergency plans to prevent and combat cholera following Hurricane Mitch and accepted a $1 million offer from the Pan American Health Organization to support the program.
Maxim Phase II Clinical Trial Highlights Substantial Increase In Leukemia-FreeSurvival For Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Patients
Maxim Pharmaceuticals announces updated results from an ongoing Phase II clinical trial of its lead drug Maxamine (TM) in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).
First Prospective Study Of Ketogenic Diet Says It Reduces Seizures
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center have long- term evidence that a 70-year-old, unconventional diet helps many epileptic children, especially those who don't respond to modern medicines.
Transient Maternal Cell Growth In Cord Blood Recipients Can Be Treated
Mothers' cells may begin to grow and form bone marrow in children receiving umbilical cord blood transplants, but any resulting rejection problems can be dealt with, researchers from Duke University Medical Center said.
The Biggest Physics Meeting In History
The American Physical Society (APS) will celebrate its 100th anniversary at a giant Centennial meeting.

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