Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

March 20, 2000
Cambridge researcher receives national award: Found better ways to make drugs, plastics and other products
Chemist Stephen L. Buchwald of Newton, Mass., will be honored on March 28 by the world's largest scientific society for developing, analyzing and finding better ways for researchers to make pharmaceutical drugs, plastics and other products.

Gene tracking follows cells from embryo to adult
Scientists have developed a sophisticated genetic tracking system that allows them to follow the migration of cells as they stream from the embryonic mouse brain to the developing body, including the primordial jaw where they contribute to the formation of teeth and supporting structures.

More passengers in car increases risk of fatal crashes for teen drivers
The risk of death in a car crash increases significantly as the number of passengers driven by 16- and 17-year-olds increases, according to a study in the March 22/29 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

UCSD-Salk Institute awards presented to Christopher Reeve, Dr. Donald Seldin, Genentech, Inc. and Dr. Dennis Slamon
The first UCSD-Salk Institute Service Award was presented to Christopher Reeve.

Study finds some bottled water has more bacteria and less fluoride than tap water
Researchers compared the bacterial content and fluoride levels of 57 samples of bottled water with tap water from Cleveland's four water treatment plants.

Nobel prize winner Mario Molina to speak at world's largest scientific society meeting
Dr. Mario Molina, Nobelist and environmental science professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will speak at the 219th national meeting of the American Chemical Society in San Francisco.

OHSU researchers first to use new technology to spot rare eye infection
Researchers at Oregon Health Sciences University have used a confocal microscope to locate an organism called acanthamoeba in the eye.

New plastic heals damaged nerves
A new plastic, or polymer, that uses electric stimulation to help regrow peripheral nerves is being explored as a way to treat nerve damage, according to findings to be presented March 29 at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society in San Francisco.

Moriches researcher receives national award: Studies nuclear fusion and the sun: How long will it shine?
Chemist Richard L. Hahn of Moriches, N.Y., will be honored on March 28 by the world's largest scientific society for his work with solar neutrinos, high-speed particles from which researchers learn about the sun and nuclear fusion.

Washington educator receives national award: Focuses on relating chemistry to everyday life
Chemist Jerry A. Bell of Silver Spring, Md., will be honored on March 28 by the world's largest scientific society for his contributions to educational projects emphasizing real-world chemistry and more than 30 years teaching chemistry to college students.

Chapel Hill researcher receives national award
Chemist Slayton Evans Jr. of Chapel Hill, N.C., will be honored on March 28 by the world's largest scientific society for opening new doors in science, especially chemistry, for minority high-school and college students.

Ames researcher receives national award: Recognized for career achievements in inorganic chemistry
Chemist John D. Corbett of Ames, Iowa, will be honored on March 28 by the world's largest scientific society for nearly 50 years of achievement in discovering entirely new kinds of solid-state compounds.

Cancer-preventive potential of white tea
Known mostly to tea connoisseurs, white tea may have the strongest potential of all teas for fighting cancer, according to Oregon State University researchers.

Hockey injuries exact terrible toll
The popularity of ice hockey is growing around the world thanks to the game's dazzling mix of speed and excitement, but researchers in this issue of CMAJ warn the sport also carries the risk of serious injury.

Penn State researcher receives national award: Insights into polymer behavior help products work better
Chemist J. Larry Duda, head of chemical engineering at Pennsylvania State University, will be honored on March 28 by the world's largest scientific society for insights into polymer behavior that help products work better - from making plastic food wrap stickier to purifying a new material for compact discs.

Daily or weekly use of paracetamol linked to asthma
Daily use of the analgesic paracetamol may be linked to worsening asthma.

Poorer lung function among children exposed to their mother's cigarette smoke while in the womb
Babies exposed to their mothers' cigarette smoke while in the womb grow into children with compromised lung power, reports research in Thorax.

Iron chefs get nutritional boost cooking vegetables
Cooking helps to increase the availability of iron already contained in such vegetables as asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, and tomatoes, making it easier for your body to absorb.

Researchers stalk 'sweet tooth' gene
Having a hard time controlling that sweet tooth of yours?

Physician-assisted suicide papers in Annals of Internal Medicine
Five papers on physician- assisted suicide from a distinguished panel of bioethicists are published in the March 21, 2000, issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.

Astronomers discover 'feeding' mechanism for black holes
Using innovative imaging techniques, astronomers discovered swirling masses of interstellar dust spiraling into the center of nearby galaxies.

Mysterious foot fractures may be sign of osteoporosis
A fractured foot bone could be a warning sign for osteoporosis.

Conference to examine nutritional supplements, medicinal herbs for managing health problems
Doctors, nurse practitioners, physician's assistants and pharmacists who need to understand the origins and effects of herbal and nutritional supplements will make up the audience March 24-26 as the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill hosts a national conference on those subjects.

Gainesville researcher receives national award: Recognized for innovative studies of flourine
Chemist William R. Dolbier of Gainesville, Fla., will be honored on March 28 by the world's largest scientific society for innovative studies of fluorine, the element that makes Teflon heat resistant.

Athletes take note: Not all energy bars built the same
Energy bars may not always give endurance athletes the boost they expect.

Marshall engineers undertake real-life 'mission' to protect NASA spacecraft, crews
While audiences thrill to the high-tech Hollywood pizzazz of

Study: passengers with young drivers boost accidents, graduated licensing might cut toll
For 16- and 17-year-old drivers, the risk of fatal injuries during motor vehicle crashes grows as the number of passengers in the vehicle increases, according to a new study.

Annals of Internal Medicine, tip sheet for March 21, 2000
Five papers on assisted suicide are published in the March 21, 2000, issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.

Glenview teacher receives national award
Frank Cardulla of Glenview, Ill., will be honored on March 28 by the world's largest scientific society for over three decades of showing his high-school students how chemistry, as he says,

USGS reassesses potential world petroleum resources: oil estimates up, gas down
The U.S. Geological Survey's latest assessment of the undiscovered oil and gas resources of the world reports an increase in global energy resources, with a 20 percent increase in undiscovered oil and a slight decrease in undiscovered natural gas.

Denver researcher receives national award: Recognized for advancing solar energy technology
Chemist Alvin W. Czanderna of Denver, Colo., will be honored on March 28 by the world's largest scientific society for advancing solar energy technology and for teaching his broad- based techniques to other researchers.

EPA, OSHA and CPSC accept non-animal system for screening chemicals' skin corrosiveness
Major federal regulatory agencies have agreed to accept chemical safety data from a synthetic skin test in lieu of an animal test, the National Toxicology Program announced today.

USGS information available on recent MTBE risk findings
What: A new study from the U.S. Geological Survey and the Oregon Graduate Institute shows that as many as 9,000 community water wells in 31 states may be affected by contamination from the gasoline additive methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) due to their proximity to leaking underground storage tanks.

Civil War offers insights into medical practice -- Conference will examine conflict's influence on medicine
From traumatic injuries and widespread infection to epidemics and hygiene, the American Civil War was the spawning ground for a number of modern medical practices.

Researchers hope new vaccine can stop shingles, a painful disease that affects older adults
The virus that causes chicken pox often comes back to haunt people as a painful disease called shingles.

New campaign brings attention to jaw joint diseases
The TMJ Association has launched a national awareness campaign to emphasize the severity of temporomandibular joint, or TMJ, diseases and demand quality research and improved treatments.

Englewood researcher receives national award: Fights cancer with vaccines and compounds found in nature
Chemist Samuel Danishefsky of Englewood, N.J., will be honored on March 28 by the world's largest scientific society for developing vaccines and new drugs to fight cancer.

Doctors beware: upper body pain could be a stress fracture
That sharp pain in a golfer's lower rib or the unrelenting soreness in a gymnast's forearm could mean more than a sore muscle - it may indicate a stress fracture.

Pittsburgh researcher receives national award: Finds new ways to make molecules used as anti-cancer drugs
Chemist Dennis P. Curran of Pittsburgh, Penn., will be honored on March 28 by the world's largest scientific society for finding new ways to make molecules used as anti-cancer drugs.

Natural substances in orange, tangerine inhibit cancer
Naturally occurring substances in citrus juices, called flavonoids, show promise against prostate cancer, lung cancer and melanoma in laboratory studies, according to a joint Canadian-United States study.

Special four-day symposium on MTBE and drinking water
More than 50 papers about the gasoline additive MTBE, including the extent of contamination in water supplies, human health risks, the government's response, cleanup methods and alternatives to MTBE will be presented during a symposium March 27 - 30 at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society in San Francisco.

UCSD physicists develop new class of composite materials with 'reversed' physical properties never before seen
Physicists at the University of California, San Diego have produced a new class of composite materials with unusual physical properties that scientists theorized might be possible, but have never before been able to produce in nature.

Emphysema linked to smoking marijuana
Regular smokers of cannabis or pot may run the risk of developing the crippling lung disease emphysema, usually associated with heavy cigarette smoking, reports a study in Thorax.

UI researchers find potential way to improve gene therapy delivery to brain
Developing gene therapy for neurodenerative diseases affecting the brain requires gene vectors to be well distributed and efficiently deposit the genes in the target cells.

Physicists produce 'left-handed' composite materials
Physicists supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) have produced a new class of composite materials with physical properties that scientists theorized might be possible, but had never before been produced.

Mutations not the only gene defect that leads to cancer
New research shows that gene mutations are not the only kinds of defects involved in the transformation of a healthy cell into a malignant one.

Scientists gain molecular understanding of how clays behave when wet
Knowing how clays absorb water at varying temperatures and humidities could help shore up undersea oil wells and improve the understanding of soil characteristics at construction sites.

Poorer lung function among children exposed to their mothers' cigarette smoke while in the womb
Babies exposed to their mothers' cigarette smoke while in the womb grow into children with compromised lung power, reports research in Thorax.

New NASA web site features women's contributions to NASA's Microgravity Research Program
A new NASA Web site features women who are making history with their contributions to NASA's Microgravity Research Program, managed at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.

What dictates hospital admission for people with HIV?
The authors of a study assessing demographic and clinical predictors of hospital admission among men and women taking anti-HIV therapies found unemployment was one of several predictors of hospitalization.

Bloomington researcher receives national award: Spent 40 years tailoring computers to the study of chemistry
Chemist Ernest Davidson of Bloomington, Ind., will be honored on March 28 by the world's largest scientific society for more than 40 years of tailoring computers to the study of chemistry.

LSU School of Architecture improving houses, lives in Mexico for $300
An LSU professor believes it is his moral obligation to improve housing for the people of Reynosa, Mexico.

Naperville researcher receives national award
Chemist E. Philip Horwitz of Naperville, Ill., will be honored on March 28 by the world's largest scientific society for developing methods to monitor radiation exposure, to separate and process nuclear waste, and other achievements in the field.

Chemical society's highest award honors nuclear chemist: Darleane Hoffman to receive the Priestley Medal
Nuclear chemist Darleane C. Hoffman, Ph.D., of the University of California at Berkeley and the E.

Supersonic transports could be powered by coal
Scientists are looking to coal, rather than petroleum, as a source of jet fuel.

How safe is the wait?
Patients awaiting coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in Ontario are at much greater risk of death than the general population.

Scientists capture new images of movement in nerves
Researchers have snapped the first pictures of a sight that has eluded scientists for years -- tiny threads of protein key to the health of the nervous system darting along nerve fibers.

Tires of the future
Experts from the United States and Europe will discuss rubber technology for the 21st Century during a symposium March 27- 28 at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society in San Francisco.

Opinion leaders forecast policy issues for next century of chemistry on Sunday, March 26 at American Chemical Society Meeting in San Francisco
A White House science official will join educators, science leaders and a San Francisco Chronicle editor to discuss science policy, research and development and their effect on the next generation in a panel discussion at the 219th national meeting of the American Chemical Society March 26 in San Francisco.
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