Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

August 14, 2000
Stress makes St. John's wort more effective
Here's a botanical twist: The more stress that is placed on wild populations of St.

Atlanta researcher receives national award
Chemist Albert Padwa of Atlanta, Ga., will be honored on August 22 by the world's largest scientific society for developing fundamental techniques to streamline the synthesis of potential drugs derived from nature.

IBM-led team demonstrates most-advanced quantum computer
The world's most advanced quantum computer has been developed at IBM's Almaden Research Center.

Man taken off heart transplant list after heart recovers on ventricular assist device
A man on the national transplant waiting list was saved not by a heart transplant but by the device surgeons implanted to support his heart until a donor organ would be found.

Ozone threatens Long Island plants
High amounts of ground-level ozone have seriously retarded the growth of ozone-sensitive plants in agricultural areas of Long Island, NY, says a Cornell plant pathologist.

Pasadena researcher receives national award
Chemist John Bercaw of Pasadena, Fla., will be honored on August 22 by the world's largest scientific society for developing better ways to make plastics and other polymers.

Annals of Internal Medicine, tip sheet, August 15, 2000
1) Zinc Lozenges Reduced Symptoms and Length of Colds;
2)Antiretroviral Therapy Cut HIV in Semen in Some But Not All Samples

Nashville researcher receives national award
Chemist Ned A. Porter of Franklin, Tenn., will be honored on August 22 by the world's largest scientific society for discovering how free radicals attack molecules in the body.

MIT researcher receives national award
Chemist Timothy M. Swager of Newton, Mass., will be honored on August 22 by the world's largest scientific society for making innovative use of active plastics - for example, to detect landmines.

Even mild and moderate prematurity puts babies at increased risk of dying
Babies born as little as one week prematurely are at increased risk of dying in the first month or the first year of life, according to a new study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

Near-term economic outlook 'marvelous,' UNC expert says
The nation's near-term economic outlook remains marvelous, a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill financial expert says.

Caffeine in colas: 'The Real Thing' isn't the taste
The majority of people who drink colas can't tell whether a soda contains caffeine or not, according to a new Johns Hopkins study.

Irvine researcher receives national award
Chemist David L. Van Vranken of Irvine, Calif., will be honored on August 22 by the world's largest scientific society for his innovative studies of proteins and their reactions in the body.

Effects of ozone pollution threaten agricultural production on Long Island, NY, says Cornell plant pathologist
High amounts of ground-level ozone - a pollutant commonly called 'smog' - have seriously retarded the growth of ozone- sensitive white clover in agricultural areas of Long Island, N.Y., according to a plant pathologist at Cornell University's Horticultural Research and Extension Center.

A threatened St. John's wort plant could be more effective as an anti-depressant, Cornell and USDA researchers find
The more stress that is placed on St. John's wort, the more effective the plant might be in warding off human depression.

Stanford researcher receives national award
Chemist Eric T. Kool of Palo Alto, Calif., will be honored on August 22 by the world's largest scientific society for his innovative research on how DNA makes copies of itself.

Berkeley researcher receives national award
Chemist Jonathan Ellman of Berkeley, Calif., will be honored on August 22 by the world's largest scientific society for his pioneering research to design, make and test families of molecules as potential drugs.

Pulse check no longer recommended for layperson CPR
The American Heart Association today unveiled a major revision of recommendations for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the treatment of cardiovascular emergencies.

New IBM supercomputer puts 'ASCI White' power to work for researchers at Boston University
Boston University has become the world's first academic institution to implement IBM's ASCI White, the most powerful supercomputer ever built.

Hearing loss a threat to children who survive 'stiff lung' condition at birth
Children who survive a condition at birth in which their lungs are too stiff to saturate their blood with enough oxygen may be at increased risk for progressive hearing loss and need periodic hearing tests, according to a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill physician.

Antiretroviral drugs are not foolproof in preventing sexual transmission of HIV, says Pittsburgh-Rio de Janeiro study
Antiretroviral therapy for HIV patients can be a double-edged sword.

University of Tennessee professor receives public outreach award
Scientist and educator Al Hazari, a professor at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, will be honored by the world's largest scientific society for helping people of all ages to understand and appreciate the wonders of science.

Soybean pest native to China detected in U.S. for first time
A new soybean pest previously unreported in the U.S. has appeared in fields scattered across Wisconsin during the past month.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Science: animal study points to new method for halting life-threatening blood pressure decline during septis
The 700,000 Americans diagnosed with sepsis each year might have a better chance of reversing the dramatic and often fatal blood pressure drop that typically accompanies septic shock if new treatments are developed based on an animal study reported in today's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

New thunderstorm forecast to help cut flight delays
A new forecast tool is quietly providing the airlines their best shot at spotting thunderstorm hazards across the nation.

Harvard researcher receives national award
Chemist David A. Evans of Concord, Mass., will be honored on August 22 by the world's largest scientific society for developing strategies for making potential drugs derived from nature.

UT Southwestern researchers move closer to explaining cyclosporine-induced hypertension
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas have uncovered a potential explanation for how cyclosporine and related anti-rejection drugs can elevate blood pressure and cause hypertension in organ-transplant recipients.

University of California, San Francisco psychiatrist's new book offers inside look into the sex lives of teenagers
Sexuality is both an important and confusing part of adolescence.
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