Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

November 11, 2000
Newest hypertension drugs may improve sexual function, says Wake Forest researcher
Sexual dysfunction in men with high blood pressure may be aided by the newest type of hypertension drug, reported Carlos Ferrario, M.D., of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, today at the American Heart Association's annual conference.

Adult stem cell therapy for heart failure proves promising
A new stem cell technique holds exciting potential for treating life-threatening heart failure, Canadian researchers reported today at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2000.

Trans fats losers in fat fight
A new study sheds light on whether a dietary fat called trans fat, found in many baked goods and fried foods, increases a person's risk of heart disease, according to researchers who presented their results at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2000.

New research finds link between gum disease, acute heart attacks
Heart attack survivors who suffer advanced gum disease show significantly higher levels of a protein in their blood called C-reactive protein (CRP) than such patients without gum disease, new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill research indicates.

Encouraging one year results in vessel growth factor trial
In one of the largest follow-up studies to date, researchers have shown that gene therapy for heart disease may relieve chest pain and does not increase the risk for cancer, according to a study reported today at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2000.

Reducing medications for heart transplant patients improves side effects without affective survival
Reducing the number of medications taken by heart transplant patients can eliminate unpleasant and unhealthy side effects without increasing the risk of organ rejection, reported Timothy Oaks, M.D., of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center at today's meeting of the Southern Thoracic Surgical Association.

Gum disease higher in heart attack patients
Individuals who are having a heart attack are more likely to have serious inflammation of gum tissue known as periodontal disease than those with no known heart disease, according to a study presented today at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2000.

¡Ciao! down: Mediterranean diet after a heart attack adds years to life
For individuals who have already had a heart attack, a

New research explains 'tip of the tongue' experiences
New research shows that a 'tip of the tongue'experience, that frustrating experience when the word you are looking for is right on the tip of your tongue but you just can't seem to get it out, may have to do with weak connections among word sounds represented in memory.
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.