Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

April 04, 2002
Pittsburgh chemist wins national award for tailor-making polymers
Krzysztof (Kris) Matyjaszewski of Pittsburgh will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for his innovative approach to making finely crafted polymers, compounds such as plastics, high-tech lubricants, even pharmaceuticals.

Schenectady chemist wins national award for research with students
Thomas C. Werner of Schenectady, N.Y., will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for conducting notable research using undergraduate students as assistants, choosing projects that help them explore a wide range of chemistry.

American Thoracic Society Journal news tips for April (first issue)
Newsworthy research includes studies showing a relationship between cat allergen concentrations in the home and asthmatic disease among sensitized women; how initially missed diagnoses and missed treatment for tuberculosis patients were common and strongly associated with in-hospital death, according to a 17-hospital Canadian study; and how bacterial infection in the lower respiratory tract is closely linked to both inflammation and abnormal pulmonary function in children with cystic fibrosis.

Parents recognise benefits of postmortems
Parents who have lost a baby view the postmortem examination as a useful and necessary tool in helping to discover the reasons why their baby died, finds a study in this week's BMJ.

Texas A&M chemist wins national award for new ways to analyze molecules
D. Wayne Goodman of College Station, Texas, will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for developing techniques to scrutinize catalysts -- chemistry's orchestrators, which help make everything from gasoline to pharmaceuticals -- in ever greater detail.

Chicago chemist wins national award for new research methods
Bipin V. Vora of Des Plaines, Ill., will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for exploring new, more efficient ways to make chemicals from petroleum, such as laundry detergent that breaks down into harmless substances in the environment.

New minimally invasive surgical procedure for arthritis may delay knee replacement surgery
A promising new treatment for people suffering from early-stage osteoarthritis of the knee is now available in the United States.

Medicine implants drastically reduce stroke complications
Implanting tiny rods containing a calcium-channel blocker in brain vessels prevented vasospasm, a complication that can occur after surgical repair of a brain hemorrhage, according to a report in today's Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Scientists listen in on the Sun to reveal new insights into its fiery dynamo
Scientists studying sound waves from deep inside the Sun have provided new insights into the solar dynamo within, which could help to explain how the Sun's colossal magnetic field behaves.

Birmingham chemistry teacher wins national award for classroom innovations
Theresa R. Corley of Birmingham, Ala., will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for her exciting, challenging approach to teaching chemistry to high school students, showing how the science -- from food to sports to simply evaluating a news report -- is entwined with everyday life.

Overstocked blood drains nation's supply
Outdated hospital blood ordering policies that require five times more blood than is necessary for cerebrovascular surgery may be adding to the drain on the nation's blood supply, according to a report in today's Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Simple blood test may be able to predict risk of preeclampsia
A simple blood test conducted during the first trimester of pregnancy may be able to identify women at risk for preeclampsia, a common and dangerous complication of late pregnancy.

Vitamin C may help 'juice up' metabolism in older adults, offsetting weight gain
A new University of Colorado at Boulder study indicates older adults may be able to combat oxidative stress in their cells that may damage tissues and interfere with normal physiological functions by loading up on vitamin C.

Rice, first crop plant to be sequenced, may help fight world hunger, Science authors say
The rice genome may provide a low-cost roadmap for investigating similar cereal crops.

Berkeley chemist wins national award for inventiveness in laboratory
T. Don Tilley of Berkeley, Calif., will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for inventing new ways to make chemicals -- from the exotic, such as flexible semiconductors for electronic devices, to basic building blocks in the chemical industry.

Spiral scan sees stroke blockage more clearly
The accuracy of diagnosing a blocked brain vessel in an emergency setting improved nearly 100 percent when physicians used a high-speed CT scanner, researchers report in today's Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Ames chemist wins national award for insights into chemical reactions
Klaus Ruedenberg of Ames, Iowa, will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for calculating in theory what happens during chemical reactions and translating those insights into real-life situations.

Antiretroviral therapy around childbirth reduces risk of mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission
Antiretroviral therapy given to women before, during, and after childbirth could be beneficial in reducing mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission in the first few weeks after delivery, suggest authors of a study in this week's issue of THE LANCET.

Austin chemist wins American Chemical Society's Priestley Medal
Allen J. Bard of Austin, Texas, will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for a remarkable career of contributions to chemical research, science policy and mentoring.

Origin of life: Experimentalists analyze fossil, genetic and other clues
The evidence is tattered, incomplete, unclear, ancient and open to conflicting explanations.

Minneapolis chemist wins national award for unique separations
Edward L. Cussler of Minneapolis will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for his remarkable methods and applications of separating molecules -- from oxygen to pharmaceuticals -- by using membranes.

Argonne chemist wins national award for studies of plant energy
Marion C. Thurnauer of Downer's Grove, Ill., will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for her contributions to research into photosynthesis, the process by which plants derive chemical energy, their

Michigan State scientists identify chemical come-on of sea lamprey
On appearance alone, one wonders how the eel-like sea lamprey could ever get a date.

Ames chemist wins national award for contributions to Human Genome Project
Edward S. Yeung of Ames, Iowa, will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for his achievements in separating and analyzing complex mixtures -- including a technique that helped speed up considerably the sequencing of the human genome.

Second stage of HIV vaccine trial begins in London and Oxford, UK
A new phase of the world's first clinical trial to test a vaccine candidate for one of the most prevalent HIV strains affecting Africa starts today (Thursday 4 April 2002) in London and Oxford.

Researchers at the University of Washington and in China release genome sequence of rice
Researchers have have sequenced the genetic code for rice, one of the most important food staples in the world.

Dow vice president wins national award for research management
Kurt W. Swogger of Freeport, Texas, will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for his innovative leadership, including the development of a customer-specific approach to making plastics that comprise food wrapping, automobile body parts, clothing and other products.

Beating heart bypass surgery reduces postoperative complications....
Results of a study in this week's issue of THE LANCET suggest that coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery done on the beating heart reduces the risk of short-term complications compared with conventional bypass surgery.

Sustainable strategies for the Plata Basin:
Long-term strategies for sustaining the Plata Basin, an economic and ecological resource in South America, will be the focus of an international workshop sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Tucson chemist wins national award for work with students
Michael P. Doyle of Tucson, Ariz., will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for his achievements with students -- from his years as a mentor in the laboratory and classroom to his role in conducting one of the largest surveys ever of college-level research.

Chicago chemist wins national award for encouraging students
James P. Shoffner of Elk Grove Village, Ill., will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for bringing opportunities to young people, particularly those in the inner city, to experience chemistry and a research career.

Patients prefer care from a nurse practitioner than from a doctor
Patients are more satisfied with care from a nurse practitioner than from a doctor, finds a study in this week's BMJ.

Action needed to tackle fake drugs trade
The World Health Organisation estimates that fake drugs account for 10% of global pharmaceutical commerce.

Keeping taxes non-taxing
More people are ahead of the tax game this season and are filing earlier than in previous years because the trend of electronic filing has finally caught on, says Timothy Rupert, associate professor of accounting and tax concentration at Northeastern University.

Buck researcher awarded Brookdale Fellowship
Novato, CA -- Matthew S. Gill, Ph.D., a scientist at the Buck Institute for Age Research, has been awarded a prestigious Brookdale Foundation Fellowship.

Princeton chemist wins national award for molecular beams
Giacinto Scoles of Princeton, N.J., will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for his achievements with laser-like beams of molecules to study and improve thin films, such as those being developed for the next generation of electronic devices, and other kinds of substances.

NHLBI sponsors National Cardiovascular Health Conference
From sessions on ways to combat trends in obesity to differences in heart attack symptoms between black and white women, health experts will present the latest findings on the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease (CVD) at a national conference sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI).

AAAS sponsors workshop for science, engineering, and technology policy professionals
A blend of plenary and breakout sessions led by seasoned science, engineering and technology (SE&T) professionals present timely policy issues to students, young professionals, and recent graduates interested in science and technology policy as a career.

Personally involved father figures enhance kids' learning in school
When dads or other father figures get personally involved, kids do better in school.

Urbana chemist wins national award for contributions to cleaner fuels
Thomas B. Rauchfuss of Urbana, Ill., will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for developing environmentally beneficial techniques such as molecular

Salem, Virginia chemist wins national award for environmental work
George R. Lester of Salem, Va., will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for his role in developing catalytic converters to reduce pollutant emissions from automobiles and other contributions to environmental science over the course of his career.

Roll out of unique device to steer balloons in flight
Global Aerospace Corporation announced today that it rolled out a full-scale prototype StratoSail® balloon flight path control system on March 16, 2002.

Megavitamins may help treat many genetic diseases, could tune up everyone's metabolism
A UC Berkeley biochemist has found a common thread among genetic diseases that respond to high-dose vitamin therapy, leading him to suggest that megavitamins be tried to ameliorate the symptoms of other enzyme-deficiency diseases, and even aging.

Study links single molecule to body's healing process
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) researchers have found that a common molecule plays a key role in reducing inflammation of injured tissue.

Why are doctors so unhappy?
Unhappy doctors are a worldwide phenomenon. Two articles this week's BMJ suggest that the cause is a breakdown in the implicit compact between doctors, patients, and society, and outline what a new compact might look like

Microscopic hydrogel chambers facilitate drug screenings
Microscopic chambers constructed of a hydrogel similar to Jell-O, may allow pharmaceutical chemists to screen chemical libraries of molecules rapidly for potential new drugs, according to a Penn State chemical engineer.

Los Angeles chemist wins national award for thin-film discoveries
Charles M. Knobler of Los Angeles will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for his insights into thin films -- like a layer of oil on water or of a semiconductor on a computer chip, or even a cell membrane -- including the complex and characteristic patterns their molecules can form.

Survival benefit for rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with methotrexate
The anticancer drug methotrexate could have a substantial survival benefit among patients with rheumatoid arthritis, conclude authors of a prospective US study in this week's issue of THE LANCET.

Grid launch drives Wales forward
A multi-million pound investment is about to put Wales

UMass computer scientist offers a new way to track internet vandals
A computer scientist at the University of Massachusetts has developed a powerful new technique for combating a form of cyber crime known as Denial-of-Service (DoS) attacks.

Tucson chemist wins national award for studies of life molecules
Victor Hruby of Tucson, Ariz., will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for his discoveries in linking hormones and other life molecules to their affects not only on body chemistry but on behavior as well.

Childhood sexual abuse proves top predictor for HIV infection in women
A history of childhood sexual abuse overshadows all other factors that place a woman at risk for contracting HIV infection, suggests a new UCLA and Charles R.

Stanford chemist wins national award for high-tech research
Hongjie Dai of Stanford, Calif., will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for his work on nanotubes, high-tech molecules shaped like microscopic hollow wires that are being developed as tough materials, for tiny electronic or sensing devices and other potential applications.

Violence against women
This week marks the start of a new Lancet series-Violence against Women.

Meningitis C vaccine is cost effective
The introduction of meningococcal C vaccine in the UK in 1999 has rapidly and substantially reduced the incidence of meningitis in young people and is cost effective, finds a study in this week's BMJ.

M.R.C. Greenwood elaborates on the risky business of research universities
On Thursday, 11 April 2002, M.R.C. Greenwood, Chancellor of the University of California-Santa Cruz will address the consequences of such a trend during the 27th Annual Colloquium for Science and Technology Policy in Washington, D.C.

Behavior management programs help seniors with chronic illnesses sleep better
Seniors with chronic illnesses who have trouble sleeping can benefit from a behavior modification program, according to a study conducted by sleep researchers at Rush-Presbyterian-St.

Tallahassee chemist wins national award for 'weighing' mixtures
Alan G. Marshall of Tallahassee, Fla., will be honored April 9 by the world's largest scientific society for techniques he and his research team have developed that can screen drugs, analyze crude oil, test forensic evidence and do other applications.

ARICEPT® significantly improves cognition, daily living over Reminyl® in Alzheimer's patients
The first head-to-head study of ARICEPT (R) (donepezil HCl tablets) vs.
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