Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

May 09, 2002
Case study highlights importance of early detection of testicular cancer
A case study in this week's issue of THE LANCET highlights how young men put their lives at risk by hiding large testicular lumps.

Researchers investigate needs of family members when a patient dies
Researchers investigate ethical obligations to the families of patients who die.

Researchers compare anthrax genomes
In a pioneering use of genomics as a tool for the forensic analysis of microbes, scientists at The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) in Rockville, Md., and at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff have found new genetic markers that distinguish the Bacillus anthracis isolate that was used in last fall's bioterror attack in Boca Raton, Florida, from closely related anthrax strains.

Cost-effectiveness assessments important for HIV response in Africa
A systematic review in this week's issue of THE LANCET highlights the importance of cost-effectiveness evaluation to identify realistic intervention programmes to tackle HIV/AIDS in Africa.

Cardiovascular disease leads to higher risk of dementia
People with cardiovascular disease have an elevated risk of developing dementia, including both Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, according to a study being presented May 9 at the annual meeting of the American Geriatric Society in Washington, D.C.

First report of stem cell signal of intention to become specific neuron
Scientists at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center in Chicago have discovered an important shortcut to creating a more efficient, more reliable, and safer source of stem cells with the ability to turn into specific neurons or brain cells.

Researchers unravel anthrax genomes
Researchers report today the genetic comparison of two important isolates of the anthrax bacterium: the well-known Ames strain and an isolate from the recent Florida anthrax attacks.

Indonesia's matriarchal Minangkabau offer an alternative social system
Most historians, anthropologists and other scholars have concluded that a genuine matriarchy has probably never existed.

Pop-up car bonnets will help reduce pedestrian deaths
Road vehicles may soon be fitted with pop-up bonnets, windscreen airbags and energy absorbing bumpers to improve pedestrian safety, according to researchers in this week's BMJ.

Memory isn't 'lost,' just out of sync
Memories are not lost, just out of sync -- say researchers at the Reynolds Center on Aging at UAMS and Johns Hopkins University.

Stanford researchers create diabetic fruit flies in lab
Researchers at Stanford University Medical Center have created fruit flies with a condition that mimics human diabetes.

'Practical gynecology' book published by ACP-ASIM
More patients are bringing gynecologic issues to their primary care physicians.

Seat belts offer more protection than air bags
Driver air bags offer relatively little benefit in road vehicle crashes compared with seat belts, finds a study in this week's BMJ.

Outstanding scholars set to improve geriatric social work in U.S.
Ten social work faculty scholars have been selected as Hartford Faculty Scholars and will receive $100,000 over the next two years to improve the well being of older adults by strengthening geriatric social work.

'SolarScan' for earlier skin cancer detection
A new Australian device stands to save thousands of lives by helping GPs diagnose melanoma.

Asthma, guide for physicians, published
Asthma is an important medical problem on the rise. From 1980 to 1994, asthma prevalence increased by 75 percent among all race, sex and age groups in the United States.

Scientists find new markers for anthrax isolates
In a pioneering use of genomics as a tool for the forensic analysis of microbes, scientists at TIGR and at Northern Arizona University have found new genetic markers that distinguish the Bacillus anthracis isolate that was used in last fall's bioterror attack in Boca Raton, Florida, from closely related anthrax strains.

No association between ageing gametes and birth defects
Authors of a research letter in this week's issue of THE LANCET conclude that there is no evidence to support the belief that sexual intercourse too soon or two long after ovulation is associated with an increased risk of birth defects and Down's syndrome.

Scripps global climate change pioneer to receive the National Medal of Science
President George W. Bush has selected Charles David Keeling, a professor of oceanography at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, to receive the National Medal of Science, the nation's highest award for lifetime achievement in scientific research.

High visibility speed cameras may increase road deaths
Government plans to increase the visibility of speed cameras and ban dummy warning signs on roads where there are no cameras may increase deaths and injuries on the road, according to a letter in this week's BMJ.

Sleepy drivers are eight times more likely to crash
Driving while feeling sleepy, driving after five hours or less of sleep, and driving between 2am and 5am are all associated with a substantial increase in the risk of a car crash resulting in serious injury or death, finds a study in this week's BMJ.

Seat belts as effective in children as in adults
Despite standard seatbelts being designed for adults, they protect school age children at least as well as adults, finds a study in this week's BMJ.

'Expert guide to infectious diseases' published
Infections comprise a sizeable proportion of common, and uncommon, problems encountered in the office of the primary care physician.

Study indicates no natural limit to life expectancy
The lifespans of people in developed nations are increasing at a remarkably constant rate, suggesting that there is no natural limit on life expectancy, said a Duke University researcher in an article in the May 10, 2002, Science.

Commonly prescribed antibiotic ineffective for treating bronchitis
A US study in this week's issue of THE LANCET concludes that the antibiotic azithromycin is ineffective for treating bronchitis, even though it is often prescribed by physicians for this condition.

Waiting to have a baby
As more women delay having babies to finish their educations and establish their careers, a University of Michigan researcher identifies an unexpected long-term implication of waiting: likely eventual extinction of the older mother's lineage.

Study by UB's RIA confirms link between alcohol consumption, work absence
Alcohol consumption is predictive of workplace absenteeism on a day-to-day basis, with employees nearly two times more likely than normal to call in sick the day after alcohol is consumed, according to a study conducted at the University at Buffalo's Research Institute on Addictions (RIA).

A caring mother is a child's best defence against drug culture
Good parenting, especially by mothers, plays a major part in keeping teenagers off drugs.

Get out of that funk - Persistent bad mood leads to poor health
Maintaining a negative mood for a long period of time is harmful to your health.

Chicago researchers testing HIV vaccine for healthy people
Infectious disease researchers at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center in Chicago have embarked on a search to find a vaccine to prevent people from contracting the human immuodeficiency virus (HIV).

President Bush names 15 to receive National Medal of Science
Fourteen scientists and one engineer today were named by President Bush to receive the National Medal of Science, the nation's highest award for lifetime achievement in fields of scientific research.

Expedition to explore remarkable deep-sea mountain
Beginning Friday, May 17, a team of marine researchers from four Monterey Bay-area institutions will explore the Davidson Seamount 1,300 meters below the ocean's surface off California's Big Sur coast.
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.