Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

June 20, 2002
Chemical & Engineering News column receives virtual recognition
Chemical & Engineering News column,

Sugar on the brain: Study shows sugar dependence in rats
It's a common refrain:

Aventis Pasteur ready to meet nation's needs for tetanus and diphtheria vaccine
Aventis Pasteur announced today that it has produced a sufficient supply of the adult and adolescent vaccine for tetanus and diphtheria, Tetanus and Diphtheria Toxoids Adsorbed For Adult Use (Td), to meet the nation's critical care and routine booster needs.

Think you're healthy? Open wide and look inside
A case report published in the June issue of the Journal of Periodontology provides another reason why abnormalities in the mouth, such as swollen or bleeding gums and oral sores, should be taken seriously.

American Thoracic Society news tips for June (second issue)
Newsworthy highlights include how researchers show that inhaled corticosteroids can improve symptoms in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)patients; an editorial on the benefits of inhaled corticosteroid use in cases of advanced COPD; and higher levels of a protein that stimulates the formation of new blood vessels in sleep apnea sufferers.

Sexually transmitted diseases, malaria, and tuberculosis and the HIV-1/AIDS epidemic in Africa
The effect of HIV-1 on other infectious diseases in Africa is an increasing public health concern.

Ultrafast laser spectroscopy tracks energy flow through molecules
Using an ultrafast laser spectroscopy technique, scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have tracked - and timed - the flow of vibrational energy through certain molecules in their liquid state.

Public school no place for mandated courses on religious or character values, say older students
The older the person, the greater the skepticism on teaching religious and patriotic values in public school, says a new University of Toronto study.

Molecular study questions Pfiesteria's link to coastal fish kills, threat to public health
Coastal fish kills and a potential threat to public health previously linked to the single-celled marine creature Pfiesteria piscicida may be a case of mistaken identity.Using new molecular detection methods, a study headed by a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill scientist found no indication that the Pfiesteria life cycle as originally described is unusually complex with many amoeba-like toxic stages.

Research shows different races, ethic groups receiving different levels of preventive care
Hispanic women are less likely to receive breast examinations and blood pressure and cholesterol screening than white women are, according to a new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine study.

African American women are at greater risk of vitamin D deficiency than white women
Nesby-O'Dell et al., publishing in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found in a study of women of reproductive age that African American women had a much higher incidence of vitamin D deficiency than white women.

With cues from nature, scientists develop new method to purify drugs
Using what might be described as a biological machine, University of Florida and Finnish researchers have demonstrated an experimental process for drug purification that one day could speed the production and decrease the cost of prescription drugs.

Research could accelerate computing to speed of light
Researchers at the University of Toronto have discovered a new technique to form tiny perfect crystals that have high optical quality, a finding that could usher in a new era of ultra-fast computing and communication using photons instead of electrons.

Simple guide for suncreams will help users
Studies have shown that consumers apply much less sunscreen than is required to achieve the sun protection factor (SPF) stated on the product.

Babywalkers delay infant development
Researchers in Ireland surveyed parents of 190 normal healthy infants (83 boys and 107 girls), born at term and attending registered day care centres.

If screening shows osteoporosis, many women may not tell their physician or begin treatment
Osteoporosis, a disease of bone-thinning that puts women at risk of serious fractures, is underdiagnosed and undertreated, a study by University at Buffalo researchers has found.

No link between epilepsy and criminality
It has long been believed that people with epilepsy are particularly prone to violence and criminality, but a study in this week's BMJ finds that epilepsy is no more common in prisoners than in the general population.

Warmer world will be a sicker world, say scientists
Global warming and changing climatic conditions are triggering disease epidemics in wildlife around the world, reports a renowned team of ecologists and epidemiologists in the Friday June 21st issue of Science.

Brains of outgoing people react more to happy faces than those of shy individuals
It doesn't matter whether people are shy or outgoing, their brains react the same way to something scary - call it a universal human trait of self-preservation.

Racial biases exist in schools, students believe
Visible minority students, especially blacks, are more likely than white students to perceive racial biases in their high schools, says a University of Toronto researcher.

Sweet citrus varieties with deep orange rind released by UC Riverside
Three new varieties of tangerines - the TDE2, TDE3, and TDE4 - are the University of California's most recent citrus varieties to be released for commercial production.

Embryonic mouse stem cells reduce symptoms in model for Parkinson's disease
Embryonic mouse stem cells transformed into neurons in a lab dish and then transplanted into a rat model for Parkinson's disease (PD) form functional connections and reduce disease symptoms, a new study shows.

Testosterone gel (AndroGel®) study demonstrates safety and efficacy up to 42 months
A Phase 3 study conducted at multiple research centers in the U.S. under the direction of Ronald Swerdloff, MD, Principal Investigator at the Research and Education Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (REI) shows that long-term use of AndroGel®, a transdermal testosterone replacement gel, is safe and effective in men with low testosterone.

New analysis shows early intervention with Actonel reduces first vertebral fracture risk
Postmenopausal women with low spinal bone mineral density (BMD) and no previous history of vertebral fracture, who received Actonel® (risedronate sodium tablets) 5 mg daily for up to three years, were 75 percent less likely to experience a first vertebral fracture than women in the control group, according to a new analysis.

Students from Middle Atlantic states win science essay
High school students from Washington, D.C., Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia are winners in the recent

Detection of glucose intolerance after heart attack
A Swedish study in this week's issue of THE LANCET confirms that people admitted to hospital with an acute heart attack are at an increased risk of having undiagnosed diabetes or increased glucose intolerance.

Eastern Washington hospitals deploy new Bridge technology to enhance patient safety
Sacred Heart Medical Center in Spokane, Washington signed a new contract to utilize the latest release of MedPoint, a barcode-enabled point-of-care (BPOC) software system, to prevent potential errors involving blood transfusions, lab specimen collection and medication administration.

Clinical symptoms may aid early diagnosis of variant CJD
The possibility of a large epidemic of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease cannot be excluded, and doctors may see patients who are worried about the possibility of this diagnosis.

Researchers identify protein that regulates killer cells
Researchers at the University of Toronto and Mount Sinai Hospital have identified a protein that plays a critical role in the regulation of

New NCI grant will support Jefferson trial to study test to diagnose colorectal cancer spread
Researchers at Jefferson Medical College and the Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, are beginning a clinical trial to determine whether a test for the protein that causes traveler's diarrhea will help provide a more accurate picture of colorectal cancer in patients.

Women with rare twin-pregnancy complication have 40% chance of delivering one baby
Authors of a research letter in this week's issue of THE LANCET provide evidence to suggest that women with a rare twin-pregnancy disorder are at no more increased risk of malignant disease than women with the disorder who choose to have their pregnancy terminated.

More clues about obesity revealed by brain-imaging study
The idea that obese people eat too much because they find food more palatable than lean people do has gained support from a new brain-imaging study at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Early promise of alternative hormone treatment for breast cancer
A fast-track study in this week's issue of THE LANCET suggests that the drug anastrozole could be an effective option for the treatment of postmenopausal women with hormone-sensitive early breast cancer.

Researchers developing technology to outsmart metastasized cancers
News that a malignant tumor has spread to other parts of the body seems like a death knell to the ears of many cancer patients.

A second type of Botulinum toxin -- Btx-B -- may be effective for treating face wrinkles
A second type of Botulinum toxin - type B (brand name Myobloc®) -- may be as effective as type A (brand name Botox®) for the treatment of facial wrinkles, according to UCSF researchers.

Women with rare twin-pregnancy complication
Authors of a research letter in this week's issue of THE LANCET provide evidence to suggest that women with a rare twin-pregnancy disorder are at no more increased risk of malignant disease than women with the disorder who choose to have their pregnancy terminated.

Sleep attacks from Parkinson's drugs do exist
Car crashes in patients with Parkinson's disease have been associated with sudden sleep attacks caused by dopamine drugs, but the concept of sleep attacks, and their connection with dopamine drugs, has been disputed.

Lean ground beef fortified with soybean phytosterols lowers cholesterol
Matvienko et al. conducted a trial in which 34 young men with elevated cholesterol ate lean ground beef fortified with soybean phytosterols at lunch every day for 4 weeks.

Evidence that adults stem cells differentiate like embryonic stem cells published in Nature
Researchers at the University of Minnesota Stem Cell Institute (SCI) have found the first evidence that adult bone marrow-derived cells can differentiate in vitro and in vivo into cells of all three embryonic germ layers (endoderm, ectoderm and mesoderm) in similar manner as embryonic stem cells (ES cells).

Cardiovascular benefits of long-term fruit and vegetable consumption
Bazzano et al. examined the relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in a large group of subjects over a period of roughly 2 decades.

Detection of glucose intolerance after heart attack could identify risk of cardiovascular disease
A Swedish study in this week's issue of THE LANCET confirms that people admitted to hospital with an acute heart attack are at an increased risk of having undiagnosed diabetes or increased glucose intolerance.

Discoverer of life-saving Nomex fire-resistant material earns Lavoisier Achievement award
Dr. Wilfred Sweeny -- the scientist who revolutionized firefighting, professional racing and other thermal-related professions by discovering the life-saving Nomex fire resistant material -- will be among 4 scientists Friday awarded the prestigious Lavoisier Medals of Achievement.

Adaptive optics technology provides powerful tools for eye doctors
The same technology that astronomers are using to sharpen the images from ground-based telescopes is also giving eye specialists better techniques for studying and correcting human vision.

Estrogen may lower women's risk of heart disease by working as damper on inflammation
Estrogen's ability to reduce a woman's risk of heart disease during her reproductive years may be based on a previously unexamined mechanism of the hormone: its anti-inflammatory effects.

Adaptive optics ushers in a new era in ground-based astronomy
Adaptive optics technology can remove the blurring effect of the Earth's atmosphere that has long plagued astronomers, allowing ground-based telescopes to achieve a clarity of vision previously attainable only by space-based instruments.

Early promise of alternative hormone treatment
A fast-track study in this week's issue of THE LANCET suggests that the drug anastrozole could be an effective option for the treatment of postmenopausal women with hormone-sensitive early breast cancer.

New cell line increases research opportunities
Researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center and colleagues have developed a germ cell line derived from spermatogonia, the stem cells that produce sperm.
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