Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

July 08, 2002
Aspirin within two days of ischemic stroke reduces deaths
Giving patients aspirin within 48 hours of the onset of an acute ischemic stroke can reduce death and severity of stroke, according to a joint scientific statement from the American Stroke Association and the American Academy of Neurology.

Low hemoglobin means high risk for mobility problems in elderly women
The amount of oxygen-carrying hemoglobin circulating in the blood of older women could have an impact on the risk for mobility problems, Johns Hopkins physicians have found.

New drug combinations help patients whose HIV develops resistance after several different treatments
A multi-center, randomized, and placebo-controlled trial of 481 people infected with HIV, co-chaired by Dr.

Heavens open up for UK astronomers
A significant milestone for British and European science occurred today [8th July 2002] when the Council of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) met in London.

Self-taught stress management techniques most effective in relieving stress of chemotherapy
Patients undergoing chemotherapy who utilize self-guided stress management techniques have significantly greater vitality and fewer physical and emotional problems, according to a study conducted at the H Lee Moffitt Center and Research Institute.

Big fish not always best, sounds might mean hurricanes and Hawaii tsunami safety
Sea Grant Research News: The

Normal gene control increases chances human stem cells will be safe
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine researchers have what is believed to be the first solid evidence that genes in human pluripotent stem cells and their progeny work normally.

Children with asthma plagued by smokers and pets
A new study indicates that two important triggers of asthma attacks are rarely removed from homes of children with asthma.

National health care access restrictions delay Alzheimer's disease diagnosis, treatment
Some 80 percent of patients with Alzheimer's disease, a highly under-recognized disorder, remained undiagnosed after presenting symptoms to their general practitioner or family physician, according to a multi-country survey of AD caregivers.

Better control of liver enzymes saves lives of HIV patients, says University Of Pittsburgh
Mild to moderate elevations in two liver enzymes - increments that are commonly ignored by most physicians - are related to an increased risk of death in people with HIV, according to a University of Pittsburgh researcher who presented the findings at the XIV International AIDS Conference in Barcelona.

Moving out and moving in
During the 90s, 2.8 million residents left the Northeast region, while record numbers of new foreign immigrants moved in.

Hopkins scientists return to the mouse to overcome some obstacles in working with human stem cells
Learning about human stem cells requires working with them, but some Johns Hopkins researchers are turning to a clever new mouse model to learn things the human cells can't teach them.

Post-transplant nerve regrowth better with young hearts, quick surgery
Spontaneous nerve regeneration after a heart transplant is more likely in cases involving young donors, young recipients and fast, uncomplicated surgery, researchers report in today's rapid access issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Ulcer bacteria linked to strokes
Potent strains of ulcer-causing bacteria may play a key role in certain kinds of stroke, researchers report in today's rapid access issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Alzheimer's drug improves pilots' performance on tests
A drug that boosts memory for Alzheimer's patients may also augment the performance of airplane pilots, according to a study published in the July 9 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

AAAS urges one-stop accountability for anti-terrorism research
The world's largest general scientific organization on July 8 urged U.S. policymakers to appoint a single official--such as an undersecretary--to coordinate all counterterrorism research and development (R&D).

Aspirin within two days of ischemic stroke reduces deaths
Giving patients aspirin within 48 hours of the onset of an acute ischemic stroke can reduce death and severity of stroke, according to a joint scientific statement from the American Stroke Association and the American Academy of Neurology.

Surprising role for Staph's toxic shock toxin
NYU School of Medicine scientists have discovered a novel role for the toxin that is responsible for toxic shock syndrome, a deadly infection linked to the use of highly absorbent tampons.

Community building reduces young gay men's HIV risk behavior
Young gay men-ages 18 to 28-in Albuquerque reported a 12% decrease in risky sexual behavior as a result of a community building HIV prevention intervention.

Genetic radiotherapy, PET scans for animals, novel spinal surgery
Newly discovered mechanical properties of breast tissue and a new high-resolution system for detecting strokes are among other highlights of the the 44th annual meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

New cold treatment developed at the University of Virginia
Scientists at the University of Virginia have developed a new combination drug therapy that delivers a one-two punch to knock out colds.

'Quiet' star wasn't quiet after all, say scientists at National Space Science and Technology Center
For more than two years the star was

Vessel reporting a weak link in national strategy to stem the flow of alien organisms to the U.S.
Of the estimated 100,000 ships entering U.S. ports from foreign waters each year, only 30 percent reported ballast water management practices during the first two years that the U.S.

Four new awards to Russian universities to improve basic science education
The U.S. Civilian Research and Development Foundation and the Ministry of Education of the Russian Federation have announced the results of the fourth competition under their Basic Research and Higher Education program.

NASA-funded scientists join others to explore tropical rainforests
NASA-funded scientists and others from around the world are gathering in Brazil at an international conference to discuss research and discoveries of how the Amazon ecosystem works.

Acid rain threatens forests in more ways than previously thought
UC Riverside Earth Scientist Martin Kennedy and colleagues report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that acid rain, by leaching essential metal nutrients (such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium) from topsoil, may pose a far graver threat to forests than has been previously estimated.

Bladder-sparing procedure found effective for treating invasive bladder cancer
For patients with the most serious form of bladder cancer, the standard of care has been to completely remove the bladder and adjacent organs.

Deformed frogs form when parasites and pesticides combine
Deformities in Pennsylvania wood frogs are linked to the combination of their infection by parasites and a weakening of their immune system caused by exposure to pesticides, researchers report.

Diagnostic kit for Chagas' disease rewarded by the Altran Foundation
Eric Deharo, biologist and pharmacologist at the Institut de Recherche Pour le Développement (IRD), working in Bolivia, has just received a special mention from the Altran Foundation (Altran Technologie) jury for his diagnostic kit for Chagas' disease in the context of the 2002 awards

Study reveals top 30 most Internet-accessible cities in the United States; Chicago leads the way
With the growth of the digital economy, a
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