Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

August 13, 2002
New drugs, cancer and diabetes treatments top ACS Boston meeting in August
Developments in new treatments for cancer, diabetes and joint replacements are among the research to be presented at the 224th national meeting of the American Chemical Society in Boston August 18-22.

Pinpointing the mutations that cause resistance to Gleevec
HHMI researchers have identified 15 specific mutations in a rogue gene that render the drug Gleevec ineffective in patients who have chronic myeloid leukemia (CML).

Sutter Health announces plan to deploy Bridge MedPoint error-prevention system
Sutter Health invests $50m in patient safety and quality, and announces a plan to deploy Bridge MedPoint error-prevention system in 26 California hospitals.

Harvard chemist wins national award for molecular mimics
Matthew D. Shair of Cambridge, Mass., will be honored August 20 by the world's largest scientific society for emulating in the laboratory how nature makes molecules and then using them to study how humans and other organisms function.

Program to reduce impact of TV violence on kids shows promise
One of the most promising intervention programs aimed at curbing the effects of television violence on children is finding success through developing

New drug boost for asbestos-related lung cancer sufferers
Clinical trials of a new anticancer drug combination carried out by researchers at Newcastle University show that it has potential to almost double the life expectancy of sufferers of Mesothelioma - a form of lung cancer which affects around 1,700 people in the UK every year - according to a report published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Pasadena chemist wins national award for catalyst research
Robert H. Grubbs of South Pasadena, Calif., will be honored August 20 by the world's largest scientific society for his innovative insights into catalysts, molecules necessary to make pharmaceutical drugs, polymers like plastic and other products.

Springfield, Mass., researcher receives award for combating terrorism with chemistry
James R. Moran of
Sites chosen for public-private Osteoarthritis Initiative
Four clinical centers and a data coordinating center have been selected to conduct the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), the public-private partnership that will bring together new resources and commitment to help find biological and structural markers (biomarkers) for development and progression of this joint disease.

Internet link moves Gemini closer to becoming first 'cyber observatory'
A unique combination of international cooperation and the latest Internet technology will allow Gemini Observatory to become the first international

Dutch researchers receive award for combating terrorism with chemistry
Koos Mencke, René Steeman and Jean Beugels of DSM N.V.

Philadelphian wins national organic chemistry award
Madeleine Joullie of Philadelphia will be honored August 20 by the world's largest scientific society for designing and constructing compounds useful in fields from medicine to forensics.

Wilmington researchers receive award for using chemistry to protect food supply
W. Mark Barbour, Ph.D., Mark A. Jensen, Ph.D., George Tice and Susan Tseng of
Initially recommended drug dosages often too high, study finds
More than 20% of the drugs approved in the United States are approved at a dosage level that is later discovered to be too high, resulting in the subsequent lowering of the recommended dosage level, according to research conducted at Georgetown University's Center for Drug Development Science (CDDS).

Female physicians more emotionally focused and 'patient-centered' when communicating with patients
Female primary care physicians spend more time with their patients and engage in more positive, social, and emotionally focused talk than their male colleagues, according to researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Northeastern University.

Computer games draw more women
Adolescent boys are not the only ones playing computer games.

Women chemists plan 75th anniversary events at Boston meeting
The American Chemical Society will pay special tribute to women chemists when it convenes in Boston August 18 - 22 for it's 224th national meeting.

Boston chemist wins national award for tailor-made molecules
James S. Panek of Boston will be honored August 20 by the world's largest scientific society for developing chemical tools to tailor-make biologically active molecules, such as pharmaceuticals.

An SSRI antidepressant is safe and effective for depressed, hospitalized heart patients
In the first study of an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) antidepressant in 369 depressed patients recently hospitalized for heart attack, the drug sertraline (Zoloft) has been found to be safe and effective.

Pennsylvania chemist wins national award for pharmaceutical research
Xumu Zhang of University Park, Penn., will be honored August 20 by the world's largest scientific society for developing tools to tailor-make drug molecules.

Female physicians more emotionally focused and 'patient-centered' when communicating with patients
Researchers from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Northeastern University found that female primary care physicians spend more time with their patients and engage in more positive, social, and emotionally focused talk than their male colleagues.

German chemist wins ACS Irving Sigal Fellowship
The American Chemical Society has awarded Hendrik Luesch, a German chemist now studying at the University of Hawaii, the Irving S.

Highlights of American Chemical Society's national meeting in Boston
Nearly 7,000 presentations on cutting-edge scientific research are on the agenda at the 224th national meeting of the American Chemical Society, Aug. l8-22, in Boston, Mass.

St. Louis chemist wins national award for inventing new materials
Karen L. Wooley of St. Louis, Mo., will be honored August 20 by the world's largest scientific society for her novel approaches to making new materials, such as nano-size containers to transport drugs around the body and coatings to protect ship hulls.

New threat to commercial fishing
Commercial fishing practices can reduce genetic diversity in fish populations, possibly threatening their productivity and adaptability to environmental change, new research has found.

Gene therapy may increase cancer cure rates, medical physicists show
An innovative combination of two medical procedures-gene therapy and radiation therapy--can increase cancer cure rates by significant amounts compared to the cure rates offered by conventional radiation therapy alone, a Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) team has concluded.

Wayne State and Virginia chemist wins national award for work with drugs
Carl R. Johnson of Hartfield, Va., will be honored August 20 by the world's largest scientific society for helping develop more efficient ways to make as well as invent pharmaceutical drugs.

Emory School of Medicine teams with deCODE Genetics to study link between genes and disease
The Emory University School of Medicine has formed a strategic alliance with deCODE genetics, an Icelandic genomics company that is using its uniquely comprehensive population data to identify the genetic factors underlying common diseases.

Reducing side effects of retinoic acid cancer treatment
Noa Noy, a professor of nutritional sciences at Cornell University, has learned how to make tumor cells up to 1,000 times more sensitive to retinoic acid, which would dramatically reduce the toxicity of retinoic acid treatment for cancer.

Tobacco firms used financial ties to weaken market for anti-smoking products
Tobacco companies have used their financial ties with nicotine gum and nicotine patch manufacturers to pressure these firms into weakening their marketing of the nicotine-replacement products, according to a UCSF study of tobacco industry documents.

Mayo Clinic study finds optimists report a higher quality of life than pessimists
Your outlook on life not only may help you live longer, but it appears to have an impact on your quality of life.

Multilateral Initiative on Malaria Secretariat to move to Sweden
The Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health announces today that Stockholm University, Karolinska Institute, and the Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control have been selected to serve as Secretariat of the Multilateral Initiative on Malaria (MIM) for 2003 to 2005.

Wilmington researcher receives award for combating terrorism with chemistry
Richard W. Rees, Ph.D., formerly of
UCI Samueli School researchers to study wetlands impact on coastal water quality
A team of Southern California researchers led by Stanley B.
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