Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

October 09, 2003
Use eggs, not embryos, to derive stem cells, say researchers
Concerns about the ethics of using embryos created to treat infertile couples for stem cell research is discussed by researchers at St Mary's Hospital, Manchester in this week's BMJ.

NASA research team successfully flies first laser-powered aircraft
Since the dawn of powered flight, all aircraft have had to carry onboard fuel to stay aloft.

Rocks could reveal secrets of life on Earth - and Mars
A new UK project could help detect evidence for life on Mars, as well as improve our understanding of how it evolved on Earth.

Nursing home residents, minorities under-treated for recurrent stroke
Only half of elderly Americans in nursing homes are treated to prevent recurrent strokes, according to a review of nursing home admission records reported in today's rapid access issue of Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Air pollution may increase stroke risk
High pollution levels may make people more susceptible to stroke, according to a report in today's rapid access issue of Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Antiretrovirals reduce mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission when started after childbirth
Results of a study from Malawi in this week's issue of The Lancet highlight how antiretroviral therapy targeted at babies soon after childbirth (because their mothers' HIV diagnosis was made around the time of delivery) is still effective in preventing vertical HIV-1 transmission from mothers to their children.

NIH told regular and moderate exposure to sunlight is the key to preventing chronic disease
The researcher who discovered the active form of Vitamin D, Dr.

Wright University's Kapp wins The Gerontological Society of America's 2003 Donald P. Kent Award
The Gerontological Society of America has chosen Professor Marshall B.

Rejection really hurts, UCLA psychologists find
Two key areas of the brain appear to respond to the pain of rejection in the same way as physical pain, a UCLA-led team of psychologists report in the Oct.

New treatment improves long-term outlook for breast cancer survivors
A Canadian-led international clinical trial has found that post-menopausal survivors of early-stage breast cancer who took the drug letrozole after completing an initial five years of tamoxifen therapy had a significantly reduced risk of cancer recurrence compared to women taking a placebo.

People are averse to taking drugs
Many people are averse to taking drugs unless absolutely necessary and would prefer lifestyle change to medication, according a study in this week's BMJ.

New technology could enhance safety in rain and snow
The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Foundation has awarded an exclusive manufacturing license to Yankee Environmental Systems to manufacture an electrical gauge that calculates real-time rates of snow, rain, and other types of precipitation.

Cancer prevention pioneer receives AACR/Cancer Research and Prevention Foundation Award
High-dose retinoic acid - a vitamin A derivative - can prevent the occurrence of new head and neck cancers in patients initially cured by surgery, radiation therapy or a combination of the two, according to more than two decades of research by Waun Ki Hong, M.D.

Beyond genes: Scientists venture deeper into the human genome
The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) today announced the first grants in a three-year, $36 million scientific reconnaissance mission aimed at discovering all parts of the human genome that are crucial to biological function.

The Gerontological Society of America confers 2003 Mentorship Award to Amherst's Whitbourne
The Gerontological Society of America has chosen Dr. Susan Krauss Whitbourne of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst's Psychology Department to receive its 2003 Award for the Distinguished Mentorship in Gerontology.

Three scientists to receive Presidential Enrico Fermi Award
John Bahcall, Raymond Davis, Jr. and Seymour Sack are winners of the Presidential Enrico Fermi Award.

Ikeno set to present the Geron Corporation - Samuel Goldstein Distinguished Publication Lecture
The University of Texas at San Antonio's Dr. Yuji Ikeno has been chosen by The Gerontological Society of America to receive its 2003 Geron Corporation - Samuel Goldstein Distinguished Publication Award.

Lone Vietnamese turtle may be last of its kind
After surviving for thousands of years in the lakes of Southeast Asia, the East Asian giant softshell turtle may finally be faced with extinction, as the last member of the species lingers on in Vietnam's Hoan Kiem Lake.

Trial results have dramatically reduced HRT use
More than half (58%) of women stopped taking HRT after the publication of a large trial in 2002 concluded that it was not suitable for the prevention of chronic diseases, finds a study in this week's BMJ.

New hybrid material has potential use in microelectronics
U of T scientists have developed a new class of hybrid materials combining organic and inorganic elements that could lead to improved computer chips, among other applications.

Purdue team solves structure of West Nile virus
Purdue University biologists have determined the structure of the West Nile virus, a development that could greatly augment our understanding of the virus' life cycle.

The Gerontological Society of America confers 2003 Lawton Award to Columbia University's Gurland
The Gerontological Society of America has chosen Columbia University's Dr.

Pushing marine fish aquaculture forward
There is enormous economic potential to farm raise such marine fish species as red drum, pompano, snapper, and others to meet the public's ever-growing demand for seafood.

Pathways of emotion - from cortex to peripheral organs
Walking down a dark alley late at night is enough to give anyone the heebie-jeebies.

Euro from Space - a unique ESA initiative to support the ISS Education Programme
Starting on Monday 20 October donations will be accepted to bid for three very special sets of euro banknotes and 15 national sets of euro coins: all were flown on board the International Space Station (ISS) during the Belgian Soyuz mission Odissea in October 2002.

U. of Michigan's Whall wins The Gerontological Society of America's 2003 Schwartz Award
The Gerontological Society of America has chosen Dr. Ann Whall of the University of Michigan as the 2003 recipient of the Doris Schwartz Gerontological Nursing Award.

HIV's assault on immune system explored at UCSF/Gladstone center for AIDS research symposium
A UCSF-Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology (GIVI) Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) symposium titled, Immunology of HIV Infection will take place October 22 and 23, 2003.

Metallic phase for bosons implies new state of matter
Bosons, scientists say, are either superconductors or insulators. The rules say they must be one or the other.

Study: Doctor's communication style may sway cancer patients
The way a doctor explains clinical trial options can affect a cancer patient's decision on whether to participate, says a Purdue University communication professor.

Carnegie Mellon receives grant to improve science instruction
The U.S. Department of Education has awarded a three-year, $750,000 grant to researchers in the Department of Psychology at Carnegie Mellon University to fund a project aimed at improving middle school science education.

Yale University's Levy wins The Gerontological Society of America's 2003 Margret M. Baltes Award
The Gerontological Society of America has chosen Dr. Becca Levy of Yale University as the 2003 recipient of the Margret M.

Genes that regulate hearing link humans and fruit flies in new way
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin Medical School have found genetic evidence linking humans and fruit flies in a new way: through their hearing.

McConnell to receive The Gerontological Society of America's 2003 Maxwell A. Pollack Award
Alzheimer's Association Vice President for Advocacy and Public Policy Stephen McConnell has been chosen by The Gerontological Society of America to receive its 2003 Maxwell A.

Antiretroviral therapy after birth decreases mother-to-child HIV transmission
A regimen of nevirapine and zidovudine given to babies after birth is 36 percent effective in blocking the transmission of HIV from mother to child, according to reserachers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Zebrafish genetic research results in significant discovery for geobiologists
A researcher at Oregon Health & Science University's Oregon Hearing Research Center and colleagues at the Max Planck Institute have discovered a new gene that has profound effects on the formation of inorganic crystals in the inner ears of zebrafish.

Scientist gets award for sending people to sleep
One of the UK's top scientists will receive a prestigious award for more than 20 years of research into the mechanisms of action of anaesthetic agents.

New ways to talk to your computer
Imagine ordering your meal in a restaurant by a simple tap on the table, transmitting your choice direct to the kitchens.

Gene expression tied to social behavior in honey bees
Genes and behavior go together in honey bees so strongly that an individual bee's occupation can be predicted by knowing a profile of its gene expression in the brain, say researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Mysterious rock markings discovery baffles archaeologists
A series of mysterious rock carvings has been discovered on lone rock in Northern England, which is baffling experts who are researching the phenomenon of prehistoric rock art as - as far as they know - they are nothing like anything that has been seen before.

The Gerontological Society of America confers 2003 Freeman Award to U. of Washington's Abrass
The University of Washington School of Medicine's Dr. Itamar Abrass has been chosen by The Gerontological Society of America to receive its 2003 Joseph T.

First reported cases of North Asian tick typhus among North Americans
A prospective study of paleontologists visiting Mongolia has resulted in the first-reported cases of North Asian tick typhus among North Americans.

Weight control throughout life key to reducing risk of raised blood pressure in middle age
Results from an ongoing UK population study investigating the association between low birthweight and increased blood pressure later in life are detailed in this week's issue of THE LANCET.

Forgiveness linked to health
Scientific presentations include the power of forgiving as it affects health: a tool for spinal cord rehab, lower blood pressure, less back pain and depression.

NCAR explores link between climate change and air quality
The National Center for Atmospheric Research and other institutions are launching a far-reaching project this month to help the government keep polluted areas in compliance with Clean Air Act standards in the event of rising global temperatures.

Alzheimer's Association cautious about new Alzheimer treatment research with antibiotics
The Alzheimer's Association expresses caution about new research on two antibiotics as possible treatments for Alzheimer's disease based on a study presented at the IDSA annual meeting.

Detection of antibodies could identify MS pats who do not respond well to interferon beta
Danish research published in this week's issue of THE LANCET highlights how the detection of antibodies to interferon beta-the first choice treatment for multiple sclerosis patients-could be important in identifying patients who do not respond well to interferon beta, with implications for the provision of alternative drug therapy.

The Gerontological Society of America bestows Kleemeier Award to Idaho's Austad
The Gerontological Society of America has chosen Dr. Steven Austad of the University of Idaho as the 2003 recipient of the Robert W.

First extrasolar planets, now extrasolar moons
ESA is now planning a mission that can detect moons around planets outside our Solar System, those orbiting other stars!

New treatment significantly improves long-term outlook for breast cancer survivors
A Canadian-led international clinical trial has found that post-menopausal survivors of early stage breast cancer who took the drug letrozole after completing an initial five years of tamoxifen therapy had a significantly reduced risk of cancer recurrence compared to women taking a placebo.

BioSecurity 2003 to draw top experts in anthrax, smallpox, SARS
Medical, public health, research professionals and journalists, who must prepare for, respond to, and cover biological and chemical threats are encouraged to attend BioSecurity 2003.

MayoClinic.com provides expert answers about latest breast cancer research findings
MayoClinic.com today has posted questions and answers from the lead United States researcher about breast cancer research findings published in today's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.

New vaccines may address need to protect newborns in the developing world
In a new study, two prototype oral vaccines have been shown capable of inducing protection against a dangerous virus in newborn mice.

The Gerontological Society of America confers 2003 Kalish Award to Utah's Pasupathi
The Gerontological Society of America has chosen Dr. Monisha Pasupathi of the University of Utah's Psychology Department as the 2003 recipient of the Richard Kalish Innovative Publication Award.

Rutgers lead on $10m NSF grant for urban math instruction
Rutgers will be the lead recipient of up to $10 million over five years from the National Science Foundation for a project focused on improving urban students' understanding of mathematics.

Nesselroade to receive The Gerontological Society of America's 2003 Distinguished Career Award
The Gerontological Society of America has chosen Dr. John R.
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.