Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

January 19, 2004
Europe's eye on Mars: First spectacular results from Mars Express
ESA's Mars Express which successfully inserted into orbit around Mars on 25 December 2003 is about to reach its final operating orbit above the poles of the Red Planet.

Small defects have large impact
Max Planck materials scientists have discovered why ferroelectric materials sometimes lose their useful properties in the nanometer range.

Novel technique may help detect certain head and neck cancers
Researchers may be able to detect head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) earlier by testing for newly discovered signature protein patterns found in patients with this cancer, according to an article in the January issue of The Archives of Otolaryngology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Century of research confirms impact of psychosocial factors on health
Over 50 percent of deaths in the United States can be attributed to behavioral and social factors, says psychologist Oakley Ray, Ph.D., of the Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry at Vanderbilt University who reviewed the last century of research on psychosocial factors and health.

New dressing for wounds developed at Hebrew University
A novel wound dressing made of genetically engineered human collagen that will enable faster and improved healing of injuries has been developed by researchers at the Hebrew University Faculty of Dental Medicine.

Understanding urinary tract infections
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Stanford University have captured time-lapse movies of a urinary tract infection (UTI) in progress, illuminating several new details of how the bacteria E. coli invade cells and gang up to overwhelm the cells' defenses.

One-size-fits-all approach to nutrition recommendations may soon be outdated
Food choices and nutrition recommendations are becoming highly individualized to meet consumers' specific needs.

Vitamin supplement use may reduce effects of Alzheimer's disease
Research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that antioxidant vitamin supplements, particularyly vitamins E and C, may protect the aging brain against the effects of Alzheimer's disease.

One dose of 'designer' gene therapy may target specific body area
Doctors may soon be able to inject gene therapy intravenously that travels to a specific part of the body, according to a study published in today's rapid access issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Melatonin may have an effect on nocturnal blood pressure
Melatonin, a naturally occurring hormone found in the body might one day be an addition to traditional high blood pressure treatments, according to a report in today's rapid access issue of Hypertension: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Annals of Internal Medicine tip sheet for Jan. 20, 2004
Highlights include

Skin photographs may help patients detect new or changed moles
Patients who used photographs of their own skin for reference were better able to detect new or changed moles while conducting skin self-examinations (SSEs) compared to patients who did not use photographs, according to an article in the January issue of The Archives of Dermatology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Evidence that memories are consolidated during sleep
By exposing rats to novel objects and measuring their brain signals, Duke University researchers have detected telltale signal reverberations in wide areas of the brain during sleep that reveal the process of consolidating memories.

Using vitamin E and C supplements together may reduce risk of Alzheimer disease
Elderly persons who take individual vitamin E and C supplements together may reduce their risk of Alzheimer disease (AD), according to an article in the January issue of The Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Discussion plus pamphlet better than just discussion for informed consent
Patients who received educational pamphlets in addition to discussing the risks related to facial plastic surgeries were better able to recall those risks later compared with patients who did not get pamphlets, according to an article in the January/February issue of The Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.
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