Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

July 10, 2004
Risky sexual behaviors reduced in high-risk adolescents with targeted HIV prevention intervention
Despite studies showing that African-American adolescent girls are at particularly high risk of being infected with HIV, no intervention strategy designed specifically for this population has previously proven effective in reducing the behaviors that lead to HIV risk.

Gender-and culturally-tailored HIV prevention programs can work well for African American teen girls
Interventions for African American adolescent girls that are gender-tailored and culturally fitting can enhance HIV (human immunodeficiency virus)-preventive behaviors, skills, and may also reduce pregnancy and some sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), according to a study in the July 14 issue of JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on HIV/AIDS.

Combination therapies show similar effectiveness as antiretroviral treatments
The first 3-year double-blinded trial comparing antiretroviral therapies has found that the combination regimens being compared, one including tenofovir DF and the other stavudine, are equally effective, though tenofovir DF has more favorable outcomes with respect to cholesterol levels and the nervous system, according to a study in the July 14 issue of JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on HIV/AIDS.

Growth hormone control may be important HIV lipodystrophy treatment
Increasing the body's production of growth hormone may be an effective treatment for HIV lipodystrophy, a syndrome involving the redistribution of fat and other metabolic changes in those receiving combination drug therapy for HIV infection.

Rapid HIV testing provides accurate and timely test results for women in labor
Rapid testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) provides timely results for women in labor which may permit a window of opportunity sufficient for interventions to decrease HIV transmission to the newborn, according to a report in the July 14 issue of JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association a theme issue on HIV/AIDS.

Two common antiretrovirals are equally effective, but one has fewer side effects
In the July 14 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), researchers from Johns Hopkins and other institutions will present results from what is believed to be the first three-year, randomized, double-blind, clinical trial comparing antiretroviral therapies for HIV infection.

Two regimens found comparable in preventing perinatal transmission of HIV
The use of the drug nevirapine is effective in reducing the risk of transmission of HIV at birth, but administration of a combination of nevirapine with the drug zidovudine to the baby does not improve outcomes, according to a study in the July 14 issue of JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on HIV/AIDS.
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