Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

April 10, 2005
Terrorist-proof buildings from new high-tech sensors
Scientists have developed a new breed of sensors which can survive incredible levels of pressure and heat and that are helping researchers work out how to make buildings that could survive massive explosions.

Certain weight control behaviors may precipitate obesity among adolescent girls
The prevalence of adolescent obesity has doubled over the last 30 years and can lead to serious medical problems, like high blood pressure, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and colorectal cancer.

Stem-cell, cancer test and black hole breakthroughs to be revealed at UK physics conference
A major breakthrough in stem-cell research; the world's most sensitive test for cancer; and a new understanding of the critical role black holes played in the evolution of the universe will be among the latest research being presented by the world's top scientists at the Institute of Physics conference Physics 2005 in Warwick 10-14th April 2005.

Breakthrough in national diseases
A common gene variant has been identified as the risk factor behind a number of common diseases by research scientists at Karolinska Institutet and the Centre for Molecular Medicine (CMM).

Sacred constant might be changing
Physical constants are one of the cornerstones of physics - sacred numbers which we know to be fixed - but what if some of these constants are changing?

Microarrays as phenotype
Microarrays provide a method of quantifying the expression and order of genes in a particular genome -- acting as a surrogate measure of cell physiology, said researchers at Baylor College of Medicine in a report that appears online today in the journal Nature Genetics.

UK physics conference to reveal breakthrough isolating stem cells from blood
A major breakthrough in stem-cell research; the world's most sensitive test for cancer; and a new understanding of the critical role black holes played in the evolution of the universe will be among the latest research being presented by the world's top scientists at the Institute of Physics conference Physics 2005 in Warwick next week (10-14th April 2005).

Microscopes at microscopic size
Traditionally if scientists wanted to look at something small they would put a sample under a microscope but now researchers have managed to shrink the microscope itself to the size of a single human cell.

Structure-building cell signals also may influence learning, memory
A Burnham Institute study has found that one of the cell's largest families of signaling molecules, called ephrins, which are known to regulate the development of nerve cells, also controls nerve cells' ability to engulf critical chemicals and proteins for learning and memory.
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