Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

April 20, 2005
World-leading scientific databases now accessible via handhelds
CAS has announced access to chemical literature and substance databases via BlackBerry® and other handheld devices, to be available to SciFinder® and STN® users in the near future.

Researchers determine two arthritis medications are safe and effective for children
An international team of researchers, led by Dr. Earl Silverman of The Hospital for Sick Children (Sick Kids), has found that two arthritis medications (methotrexate and leflunomide) commonly used in adults are safe and effective in children.

Fox Chase Cancer Center researchers identify subset of ovarian cancer patients responsive to Iressa
Researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia have identified a subset of ovarian cancer patients who appear to respond better than others to gefitinib, or Iressa (TM).

New research reveals common beliefs about gender differences in health
New research from University of Glasgow researchers on lay perceptions about gender differences in health reveals that both men and women believe health risks are higher for their own sex than for the opposite sex.

Same-sex mating discovered in a toxic fungus
An infectious fungus has been found to defy the most basic tenet of sexual reproduction - that successful mating requires individuals of the opposite sex, according to Howard Hughes Medical Institute researchers at Duke University Medical Center.

Gene associated with breast cancer may play major role in prostate cancer recurrence
A gene associated with breast cancer also may play a major role in the recurrence of prostate cancer, according to new research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine and UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Human cells filmed instantly messaging for first time
Researchers at UCSD and UC Irvine have captured on video for the first time chemical signals that traverse human cells in response to tiny mechanical jabs, like waves spreading from pebbles tossed into a pond.

Overworked brains release adenosine to slow cells, trigger sleep, UT Southwestern researchers find
Why people get drowsy and fall asleep, and how caffeine blocks that process, are the subjects of a new study by researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center.

Brain-injury rehabilitation depends on acetylcholine circuitry
The ability of the brain to recover from such injury as stroke or trauma depends on a particular circuitry of neurons that

Early detection of lung cancer
This study was aimed at the detection of lung cancer in its early stages amongst high-risk persons by means of Computerised Axial Tomography (CAT).

HAPPEx results hint at strangely magnetic proton
New results from research performed at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab hint that strange quarks may contribute to the proton's magnetic moment.

General Motors wins prestigious 2005 Informs Edelman Award
General Motor's innovative approach to problem-solving has won the 2005 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research and the Management Sciences.

Child health teacher numbers at worrying levels
Concerns over the future of children's health care in the UK are being raised as new research shows the numbers of clinical teachers in this field have dropped dramatically in recent years.

Five Nobel laureates to participate in Pacific Institute of Theoretical Physics Showcase conference
From the vastness of the cosmos to the unimaginably small, five physics and chemistry Nobel laureates, two pre-eminent science authors and scores of the world's leading scientists will explore current developments in physics when the University of British Columbia's Pacific Institute of Theoretical Physics (PITP) hosts a major international conference, the PITP Showcase, from May 11-16.

Study shows antibiotic treatment does not reduce risk of secondary cardiac events
Taking antibiotics weekly for a year does not reduce the risk of a heart attack or other cardiac event for patients with stable coronary artery disease, according to a University of Washington study.

Reducing specific gene levels makes breast cancer cells more responsive to ionizing radiation
Reducing expression of a gene called BRCC36 that interacts with the breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) makes breast cancer cells more responsive to ionizing radiation, according to scientists at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.

Feeling safe and secure? CUMC scientists find it's all in the caudoputamen
Scientists at Columbia University Medical Center have made a surprising finding about positive emotions that should change the way people think about anxiety disorders.

Mother's prenatal and lactational diet may protect daughters from breast cancer
Mothers who eat foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids during pregnancy and while nursing, and who continue to feed their babies such a diet after weaning, may reduce their daughters' risk of developing breast cancer later in life dramatically, according to research presented here today at the 96th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Ivory encore for dead pianists
Next month music lovers will be able to hear two of the greatest piano players of the 20th century in concert.

How safety feels good
Much research has been done on how

New research pinpoints best treatment for stroke
The largest research to date on the use of CT perfusion imaging to guide stroke treatment reveals that this readily available diagnostic tool is highly effective at determining the best candidates for clot busting medicines and clot retrieval devices.

New tumor suppressor gene linked to cancer predisposition
Scientists have identified a new gene that appears to be linked to a small but significant percentage of familial cancer cases - as well as seemingly randomly occurring malignancies.

Green tea shown to prevent prostate cancer
After a year's oral administration of green tea catechins (GTCs), only one man in a group of 32 at high risk for prostate cancer developed the disease, compared to nine out of 30 in a control, according to a team of Italian researchers from the University of Parma and University of Modena and Reggio Emilia led by Saverio Bettuzzi, Ph.D.

A puzzle piece found in unraveling the wiring of the brain
The complexity of the brain and, more specifically, how nerve cells form billions of contacts when there are fewer than 30,000 human genes is still a scientific mystery.

Trusts perform better on chemical incidents but protective suits and tents still imperfect
Trusts are far better prepared to deal with patients injured in chemical incidents following national training but the design and distribution of chemical protective suits and shelters are still a problem, says research published this week in Emergency Medicine Journal.

Fox Chase Cancer Center researchers: Selenium will have critical role in prostate cancer treatment
Researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia have come a step closer to understanding selenium's molecular role in causing prostate cancer cells to self-destruct.

Cerebral navigation: How do nerve fibers know what direction to grow in?
Growth cones, structures in the tips of nerve fibers, are responsible for steering growing fibers in the right direction to make appropriate connections with other nerve cells.

Scientists develop technology to detect cancer
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have developed a breakthrough technology that identifies molecular markers in early lung cancer.

Extreme life discovery in Yellowstone bodes well for astrobiologists, says Colorado U. study
University of Colorado at Boulder researchers say a bizarre group of microbes found living inside rocks in an inhospitable geothermal environment at Wyoming's Yellowstone National Park could provide tantalizing new clues about ancient life on Earth and help steer the hunt for evidence of life on Mars.

Study links cigarette smoking with progression of multiple sclerosis
Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) recently discovered that cigarette smoking may contribute to the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS), suggesting that quitting smoking could limit or delay central nervous system deterioration.

Immune system's initial response to cancer under study
A mouse model enabling studies of the immune system's initial response to cancer has been developed by a Medical College of Georgia researcher.

Capital quality improvement and the sources of economic growth in the Euro area
This paper evaluates the sources and speed of European growth adjusting the prices of new capital goods to reflect the improvement in quality embodied in them.

NIBIB holds first regional grantsmanship seminar
The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) will hold its first regional Grantsmanship Seminar on Wednesday, April 20, 2005, in Troy, New York.

New study shows antibiotic treatment does not reduce risk of secondary cardiac events
Taking antibiotics weekly for one year does not reduce the risk of a heart attack or other cardiac event for patients with stable coronary artery disease, according to a study funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health.

JLab, College of W&M researchers study radiation blockers
Scientists have found that a dose five times higher than the FDA-recommended dosage of potassium iodide in the event of a nuclear accident is needed to protect small animals effectively from radioactive iodide in medical imaging procedures.

New drug may be used to treat women with ovarian cancer
A new drug, RAD001, has been shown to stop the growth and movement of certain ovarian cancer cells, according to scientists at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.

LLNL physicist dates lifetime of solar nebula at 2 million years
The oxygen and magnesium content of some of the oldest objects in the universe are giving clues to the lifetime of the solar nebula, the mass of dust and gas that eventually led to the formation of our solar system.

How to smash the system
Computer criminals are using a kind of attack seen in the early days of the internet but which now seems to be back - and this time it's far more likely to cause serious damage.

Football players are sportsmen most at risk of injury
Football players are far more likely to have injuries than other athletes including swimmers, tennis players and gymnasts, according to research published this week in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Heavy consumption of processed meats linked to increased risk for pancreatic cancer
Heavy consumption of hot dogs, sausages and luncheon meats, along with other forms of processed meat, was associated with the greatest risk of pancreatic cancer in a large multiethnic study reported today at the 96th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Breakthrough in forecasting US hurricane activity by UCL scientists
The strength of hurricane activity striking the United States during the main hurricane season can now be predicted with significant accuracy thanks to a new computer model developed by scientists at University College London (UCL).

Football is a pain in the neck
According to new research published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, football beats hockey and soccer for the dubious distinction of the sport most likely to cause neck injury.

Better referral training for emergency doctors helps improve patient care
Emergency doctors with specific training in making referrals can help achieve a safer patient experience, according to research published this week in Emergency Medicine Journal.

Electroshock therapy speeds improvement in schizophrenia patients
Shock therapy, a controversial practice conjuring frightening images of behavior control, still has a place in schizophrenia treatment, a newly updated research review shows.

Nuclear imaging of iodine uptake in mouse tissues
Scientists have found that a dose five times higher than the FDA-recommended dosage of potassium iodide in the event of a nuclear accident is needed to protect small animals effectively from radioactive iodide in medical imaging procedures.

Used in a new way, RNA interference permanently silences key breast cancer gene
In laboratory mouse experiments, researchers at The University of Texas M.

Is it or isn't it? Pentaquark debate heats up
New data from the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab shows the pentaquark doesn't appear in one place it was expected.

Louder neurons form more connections, Stanford research shows
As the brain develops, neurons reach out helter-skelter to form new connections, only a small number of which take hold.

Geologists find a new active fault in Nepal
A Dartmouth researcher is part of a team that has discovered a new active
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