Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

February 17, 2007
Computer program bridges gap between scientists, water policy makers
A computer visualization tool developed by Arizona State University researchers can simulate the effects environmental and policy factors have on the future of water availability in the Phoenix metropolitan area.

Steering atoms toward better navigation, physicists test Newton and Einstein along the way
''Navigation problems-how to get from point A to point B-tell us about space-time,'' says Kasevich, a professor in the departments of Physics and Applied Physics who will speak about atomic sensors February 17 in San Francisco at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Scientific literacy -- How do Americans stack up?
Having a basic knowledge of scientific principles is no longer a luxury but, in today's complex world, a necessity.

Study verifies more hazardous waste facilities located in minority areas
New research from the University of Michigan is the first known national level study that supports environmental justice scholars' claim that hazardous waste facilities are disproportionately placed in poor, minority neighborhoods.

Computer scientists join in search for ivory-billed woodpecker
Computer scientists from Texas A&M University and the University of California, Berkeley, have installed a robot in the Cache River National Wildlife Refuge to help natural scientists from Cornell University's Laboratory of Ornithology and the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission find the rare ivory-billed woodpecker.

The last wild hunt -- Deep-sea fisheries scrape bottom of the sea
At a 9 am press conference at the American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting (AAAS) on February 18th, an international team of leading fisheries economists, biologists, and ecologists will call for the abolition of government fuel subsidies that keep deep-sea fishing vessels moving to deeper waters.

Bombs and bodies: Children living in extremes
Bombings in Baghdad, bodies floating in New Orleans. Even as these events numb adult minds, they have left children insecure and frightened.

Energy insecurity -- a weapon of mass disruption?
For years we've all heard the statistics -- and warnings -- about U.S. imports of oil and natural gas, for example, and our dependence on foreign sources.

Isotope science to have wide-ranging impact, NSCL researcher says
Nuclear science -- and a host of other endeavors that involve the production, study and use of rare isotopes -- is undergoing a quiet but dramatic revolution.

Treat childhood trauma by buidling on parental memories of loving care
Infants and preschool-aged children who live in daily circumstances of potential trauma and danger can develop the resilience to cope through treatment that focuses on strengthening parent-child bonds, according to a national expert in child development.

Highly accomplished people more prone to failure than others when under stress
Talented people often choke under pressure because the distraction caused by stress consumes their working memory.

Harvard scientists partner to develop and distribute new tuberculosis vaccine
Bioengineers and public health researchers at Harvard University have developed a novel spraying method for delivering the most common tuberculosis (TB) vaccine, providing a new low-cost and scaleable technique that offers needle-free delivery and greater stability at room temperature than existing methods.

SF Bay Area's poor face disproportionate burden of exposure to environmental hazards
A new report issued by the Center for Justice, Tolerance, and Community at the University of California, Santa Cruz, entitled

Worldwide research network needed to really understand what is changing in the Arctic
An Ohio State University geologist today outlined a new plan to oceanographers that would consolidate much of the world's studies on the Arctic region into a global observation network.

The insides of clouds may be the key to climate change
As climate change scientists develop ever more sophisticated climate models to project an expected path of temperature change, it is becoming increasingly important to include the effects of aerosols on clouds, according to Joyce E.

Robotic cameras join search for 'Holy Grail of bird-watching'
A high-resolution intelligent robotic video system, developed by researchers at UC Berkeley and Texas A&M University, has been installed in the Cache River National Wildlife Refuge in Arkansas as part of a major effort to obtain conclusive proof that an elusive bird is not extinct.

Breakthrough for The Planet
Today, February 17, the Web site The Planet Infact was launched in English.

Neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky will discuss stress, health, Feb. 17 at AAAS meeting
Why do humans and their primate cousins get more stress-related diseases than any other member of the animal kingdom?

Mathematical model predicts cholera outbreaks
A mathematical model of disease cycles developed at the University of Michigan shows promise for predicting cholera outbreaks.

Ocean governance: Evolving systems
The AAAS topic is

High-quality helium crystals show supersolid behavior
High-quality, single-crystal, ultra-cold solid helium exhibits supersolid behavior, suggesting that this frictionless solid flow is not a consequence of defects and grain boundaries in poor-quality, polycrystalline, solid helium, according to a team of Penn State researchers.

Stanford professor to discuss the ups and downs of 'team science'
The most complex quandaries of science cannot be answered by pure disciplinary research, according to Richard Zare, professor and chair of the Department of Chemistry at Stanford University.

Enter 'Junior': Stanford team's next-generation robot joins DARPA Urban Challenge
When five autonomous vehicles, including the Stanford Racing Team's winning entry

Stem cell transplants explored at Stanford as a possible treatment for hearing loss
As a leader in stem cell-based research on the inner ear at the Stanford University School of Medicine, he's got a step-by-step plan for making this dream a reality.
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