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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | March 09, 2008


Scientists determine structure of brain receptor implicated in epilepsy and PMT
Scientists funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council have published new research in the journal Molecular Pharmacology identifying the structure of a receptor in the brain implicated in conditions such as epilepsy and pre-menstrual tension.
Oregon study raises questions on synthetic progestins
The widely used synthetic progestin medroxyprogesterone acetate decreased endothelial function in premenopausal women in a study done at the University of Oregon.
Public views philanthropic efforts as essential, HU survey shows
Even though there is considerable opinion among Israelis that much of the public social programs and projects should be the responsibility of the government, the public nevertheless views philanthropic activity in a highly positive light and believes that it plays an essential role in Israeli society.
Experts call for community mobilization to curb youth violence
Homicide is the second leading cause of death for all 15-24 year-olds, and the leading cause for African-American youth.
Drosophila drug screen for fragile X syndrome finds promising compounds and potential drug targets
Scientists using a new drug screening method in Drosophila (fruit flies), have identified several drugs and small molecules that reverse the features of fragile X syndrome -- a frequent form of mental retardation and one of the leading known causes of autism.
Genetic research unveils common origins for distinct clinical diagnoses
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have discovered that two clinically different inherited syndromes are in fact variations of the same disorder.
New discovery at Jupiter could help protect Earth-orbit satellites
Radio waves accelerate electrons within Jupiter's magnetic field in the same way as they do on Earth, according to new research published in Nature Physics this week.
Europe launches its first resupply ship -- Jules Verne ATV -- to the ISS
Jules Verne, the first of the European Space Agency's Automated Transfer Vehicles, a new series of autonomous spaceships designed to resupply and reboost the International Space Station, was successfully launched into low Earth orbit by an Ariane 5 vehicle this morning.

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