Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

June 08, 2009
More than just the tailpipe
Trains, planes, buses and automobiles do not only effect the environment via their exhaust pipes.

Television watching before bedtime can lead to sleep debt
According to a research abstract that will be presented on Monday, June 8, at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, television watching may be an important determinant of bedtime, and may contribute to chronic sleep debt.

New research program BioInterfaces launched
BioInterfaces represents an ambitious new

Scientists say consumers confused about sugars
Three top researchers corrected inaccuracies and misunderstandings concerning high fructose corn syrup's impact on the American diet.

Metabolic changes leading to diabetes begin several years before diagnosis
Blood glucose trends and insulin sensitivity change several years before onset of type 2 diabetes.

NIH invests $46 million in regional consortium for emerging infectious disease research
W. Ian Lipkin, M.D., John Snow Professor of Epidemiology and director of the Center for Infection and Immunity at the Mailman School of Public Health and professor of Neurology and Pathology at Columbia University Medical Center, will direct the activities of the Northeast Biodefense Center, a consortium of more than 350 scientists and 28 institutions and one of the National Institutes of Health's Regional Centers of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases.

Gene therapy for hemophilia A mice
Hemophilia A is an inherited bleeding disorder caused by a lack of the blood clotting protein Factor VIII.

Snakes use friction and redistribution of their weight to slither on flat terrain
Snakes use both friction generated by their scales and redistribution of their weight to slither along flat surfaces, researchers at New York University and the Georgia Institute of Technology have found.

Pitt researchers identify key molecular pathway to replicate insulin-producing beta cells
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine are trailblazing the molecular pathway that regulates pancreatic beta cell replication, the insulin-producing cells that are lacking in people who have diabetes.

American Society for Microbiology honors Richard W. Castenholz
The 2009 American Society for Microbiology USFCC/J. Roger Porter Award is being presented to Richard W.

Plant-based, low-carb diet may promote weight loss and improve cholesterol levels
Overweight individuals who ate a low-calorie, low-carbohydrate diet high in plant-based proteins for four weeks lost weight, and experienced improvements in blood cholesterol levels and other heart disease risk factors, according to a report in the June 8 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

American Society for Microbiology honors Mary J.R. Gilchrist
The 2009 American Society for Microbiology Gen-Probe Joseph Public Health Award is being presented to Mary J.R.

Vaporized viral vector shows promise in anti-cancer gene therapy
A new lung cancer therapy employing a vaporized viral vector to deliver a cancer-inhibiting molecule directly to lung tissue shows early promise in mouse trials, according to researchers at the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology in Korea.

Keck study sheds new light on 'dark' gamma-ray bursts
Gamma-ray bursts are the universe's biggest explosions, capable of producing so much light that ground-based telescopes easily detect it billions of light-years away.

Natural seed treatment could drastically cut pesticide use
Farmers could save billions on pesticides and help protect the environment by dipping seeds in a natural plant chemical.

Boys with intermittent eye deviation appear more likely to develop mental illness
Children and especially boys diagnosed with intermittent exotropia, a condition in which the eye turns outward (away from the nose) only some of the time, appear more likely to develop mental illness by young adulthood than children without strabismus (when the eyes deviate or are misaligned when looking at an object), according to a report in the June issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

American Society for Microbiology honors Pratik P. Shah
A 2009 American Society for Microbiology Raymond W. Sarber Award is being presented to Pratik P.

More Ontario children are getting diagnosed with diabetes: ICES study
Ontario children are more likely to get diagnosed with diabetes than their American counterparts.

American Society for Microbiology honors Terry A. Krulwich
The 2009 American Society for Microbiology William A. Hinton Research Training Award will be presented to Terry A.

Stopping diabetes damage with vitamin C
Researchers at the Harold Hamm Oklahoma Diabetes Center have found a way to stop the damage caused by type 1 diabetes with the combination of insulin and a common vitamin found in most medicine cabinets.

American Society for Microbiology honors Stanley A. Plotkin
The inaugural 2009 American Society for Microbiology Maurice Hilleman/Merck Award was presented to Stanley A.

Self-regulation game predicts kindergarten achievement
Early childhood development researchers have discovered that a simple, five-minute self-regulation game not only can predict end-of-year achievement in math, literacy and vocabulary, but also was associated with the equivalent of several months of additional learning in kindergarten.

New alternatives for bone imaging could be on the horizon
On June 4, the US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced that it is considering a pathway for coverage of Sodium Fluoride (NaF-18) for PET bone imaging as an alternative to Technetium-99m imaging.

Many breast cancer patients take high doses of antioxidants despite possible consequences
A new study finds that many women with breast cancer take antioxidant supplements while undergoing cancer treatment, even though the consequences of doing so are unknown.

American Chemical Society's Weekly PressPac -- June 3, 2009
The American Chemical Society Weekly Press Package with reports from 34 major peer-reviewed journals on chemistry, health, medicine, energy, environment, food, nanotechnology and other hot topics.

Fog lifted on 'dark' gamma-ray bursts, mysterious counterparts to bursts with an afterglow
Gamma-ray bursts are revealing areas of intense star formation and stellar death where astronomers have been unable to look -- the dusty corners of otherwise dust-free galaxies.

Diabetes patients should have regular exercise, weight training
To reduce their cardiovascular risk, patients with type 2 diabetes should do at least two-and-a-half hours per week of moderate-intensity or one-and-a-half hours per week of vigorous-intensity aerobic exercise or a combination of the two.

Study says colorectal cancer increasing in young adults
A new study finds that in sharp contrast to the overall declining rates of colorectal cancer in the United States, incidence rates among adults younger than age 50 years are increasing.

Researchers shed light on trading behavior in animals -- and humans
Georgia State's Sarah Brosnan, assistant professor of psychology, and research scientist Michael Beran conducted a study to see if chimpanzees spontaneously bartered foods among each other, using tokens which represented those foods.

Scripps research scientists uncover a novel mechanism controlling tumor growth in the brain
As survival rates among some patients with cancer continue to rise, so does the spread of these cancers to the brain -- as much as 40 percent of all diagnosed brain cancers are considered metastatic, having spread from a primary cancer elsewhere in the body.

Scientists determine geese involved in Hudson River plane crash were migratory
Smithsonian scientists have examined the feather remains from the Jan.

Cognitive impairment linked to reduced survival regardless of race
Alzheimer's disease and its precursor, mild cognitive impairment, appear to be associated with an increased risk of death among both white and African-American older adults, according to a report in the June issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Study finds regular daily exercise does not increase total sleep time
According to a research abstract that will be presented on Monday, June 8, at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, days with increased activity were followed by nights with lower total sleep time, while nights with lower TST were followed by increased activities during the next day.

Cardiac rehabilitation saves lives
Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and a major driver of medical and economic costs, especially among older adults.

Accuracy essential to success of XBRL financial filing program
The largest 500 companies regulated by the SEC are poised to submit their first financial reports that will be tagged using XBRL code -- which allows computers to

Encouraging early findings for new drug -- aleglitazar -- for treatment of type 2 diabetes
Findings from the phase II SYNCHRONY study show that aleglitazar, a treatment for type 2 diabetes, could be safe and effective, and thus will be entered into phase III trials.

How a drug to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia is degraded
L-Asparaginase is one of the key drugs used to treat children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

University of Saskatchewan and Canadian Synchrotron researchers shed light on esophageal disease
Scientists from the Canadian Light Source synchrotron and the University of Saskatchewan's College of Medicine used the synchrotron's infrared microscope to identify the chemical fingerprint of Barrett's esophagus, a condition that can lead to esophageal cancer.

American Society for Microbiology honors George Liu
A 2009 American Society for Microbiology Merck Irving S. Sigal Memorial Award is being presented to George Liu, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of pediatrics at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center/UCLA.

Scientists should look at their own carbon footprint
Scientists studying the impact of climate change on the Arctic need to consider ways to reduce their own carbon footprints, says University of Calgary veterinary medicine researcher Ryan Brook, who regularly flies north to study the health of caribou.

Breastfeeding associated with a reduced risk of relapse in women with multiple sclerosis
Women with multiple sclerosis who breastfeed exclusively for at least two months appear less likely to experience a relapse within a year after their baby's birth, according to a report posted online today that will appear in the August print issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Enigmatic sea urchin structure catalogued
A comprehensive investigation into the axial complex of sea urchins has shown that within that group of marine invertebrates there exists a structural evolutionary interdependence of various internal organs.

Study redefines roles of alcohol, smoking in risk for pancreatitis
Although alcohol consumption is known to be associated with chronic pancreatitis, new evidence indicates that a threshold of five or more drinks per day is required to significantly raise risk; however, most patients with chronic pancreatitis do not drink this amount, according to a report in the June 8 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Is this the beginning of the end of plant breeding?
Clonal reproduction of crop species took a step closer to being realized with new research published in PLoS Biology this week.

Fossil teeth of browsing horse found in Panama Canal earthworks
Rushing to salvage fossils from the Panama Canal earthworks, Aldo Rincon, paleontology intern at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, unearthed a set of fossil teeth.

Toward cheaper imaging systems for identifying concealed weapons on the human body
Electrical engineers from UC San Diego have created high-performance W-Band silicon-germanium radio frequency integrated circuits for passive millimeter-wave imaging.

Siberian jays use complex communication to mob predators
When mobbing predators, Siberian jays use over a dozen different calls to communicate the level of danger and predator category to other members of their own group.

'The Fibromyalgia Controversy'
As many as 15 million American women suffer from a disabling medical condition known as fibromyalgia.

MU study finds connection between evolution, classroom learning
Over thousands of years, humans have evolved to naturally understand things like facial expressions and social interactions.

Sleep disorders are largely underdiagnosed in pediatric patients
Primary care pediatricians may be underdiagnosing sleep disorders in children and teens, according to a research abstract that will be presented on Monday, June 8, at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.

American Society for Microbiology honors Arthur P. Guruswamy
The 2009 American Society for Microbiology Scherago-Rubin Award is being presented to Arthur P.

American Society for Microbiology honors Abigail A. Salyers
The 2009 American Society for Microbiology ASM Graduate Microbiology Teaching Award will be presented to Abigail A.

What about the boys?
According to Judith Kleinfeld, professor of psychology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks in the US, issues affecting boys are more serious than those affecting girls, but they have been neglected by policy makers.

Concussion experts: For kids -- no sports, no schoolwork, no text messages
When it comes to concussions, children and teens require different treatment, according to international experts who recently published consensus recommendations.

An estimated 4 percent of older US men have dry eye disease
Dry eye disease is common among American men older than 50 and increases with age, high blood pressure, benign prostate disease and the use of antidepressants, according to a report in the June issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Let me sleep on it: Creative problem solving enhanced by REM sleep
Research led by a leading expert on the positive benefits of napping at the University of California -- San Diego School of Medicine suggests that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep enhances creative problem-solving.

Health risks begin in overweight range, BMI doesn't tell whole story
Being overweight increases the risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and other health conditions.

Women underrepresented in cancer research, U-M study finds
Women are underrepresented in clinical cancer research published in high-impact journals, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Starting antiretroviral therapy earlier yields better clinical outcomes
A clinical trial has demonstrated that HIV-infected adults in a resource-limited setting are more likely to survive if they start antiretroviral therapy before their immune systems are severely compromised.

American Society for Microbiology honors Philippe Sansonetti
The 2009 American Society for Microbiology GlaxoSmithKline International ASM Member of the Year Award is presented to Philippe Sansonetti, M.D., director, Unité de Pathogénie Microbienne Moléculaire, Institut Pasteur, Paris.

American Society for Microbiology honors J. Michael Miller
The 2009 American Society for Microbiology Founders Distinguished Service Award is being presented to J.

Long and short sleep durations are associated with increased risk for diabetes
According to a research abstract that will be presented on Monday, June 8, at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, both long and short sleepers are at greater risk for diabetes.

Cognitive impairment is associated with reduced survival among both African-Americans and whites
Alzheimer's disease and its precursor, mild cognitive impairment, appear to be associated with an increased risk of death among both white and African-American older adults according to a new, long-term research study by neurological experts at the Alzheimer's Disease Center at Rush University Medical Center.

Fire mitigation work in western US misplaced, says new study led by CU-Boulder
Only 11 percent of wildfire mitigation efforts undertaken as a result of a long-term federal fuels-reduction program to cut down catastrophic wildfire risk to communities have been undertaken near people's homes or offices in the past five years, says a new study led by the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Less sleep associated with high, worsening blood pressure in middle age
Middle-aged adults who sleep fewer hours appear more likely to have high blood pressure and to experience adverse changes in blood pressure over time, according to a report in the June 8 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Green Chemistry Conference slated June 23-25 in Maryland
The American Chemical Society's 13th annual Green Chemistry & Engineering Conference will be held June 23-25 at the University of Maryland, College Park, and will focus on advances in green chemistry, including renewable energy fuels and feedstocks, toxicological fate and effects of chemicals, life cycle analysis of products and processes, and managing and preventing greenhouse gases.

Defeating nicotine's double role in lung cancer
A lung cancer treatment that inhibits nicotine receptors was shown to double survival time in mice, according to Italian researchers.

Lyme disease is spreading in Canada, and physicians are crucial in helping minimize its impact
Lyme disease is emerging in Canada, and is expected to increase with climate change, but effective, enhanced surveillance and clinician awareness will be key to minimizing the impact of the disease, write researchers in a review in CMAJ.

Study: Engineering stereotypes drive counterproductive practices
Research performed by Professor Paul Leonardi finds that bad practices that many students believe will make them become expert engineers are the ire of managers who hire recent engineering graduates.

New cleaning protocol for future 'search for life' missions
Scientists have developed a new cleaning protocol for space hardware, such as the scoops of Mars rovers, which could be used on future

Many breast cancer patients take high doses of antioxidants despite possible consequences
A new study finds that many women with breast cancer take antioxidant supplements while undergoing cancer treatment, even though the consequences of doing so are unknown.

Race and short sleep duration increase the risk for obesity
According to a research abstract that will be presented on Monday, June 8, at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, race significantly influences the risk of obesity conferred by short sleep duration, with blacks having a greater risk than whites.

Archeological evidence of human activity found beneath Lake Huron
More than 100 feet deep in Lake Huron, on a wide stoney ridge that 9,000 years ago was a land bridge, University of Michigan researchers have found the first archeological evidence of human activity preserved beneath the Great Lakes.

Moon magic: Researchers develop new tool to visualize past, future lunar eclipses
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a new method for using computer graphics to simulate and render an accurate visualization of a lunar eclipse.

UBC researcher solves century-old enigma of prehistoric marine mass grave
Good old-fashioned detective work has turned up the first conclusive explanation for the origin of a massive bonebed in southern California, according to a new study led by a UBC paleontologist.

Study shows sleep extension improves athletic performance and mood
Athletes who extended their nightly sleep and reduced accumulated sleep debt reported improvements in various drills conducted after every regular practice, according to a research abstract that will be presented on Monday, June 8, at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.

Study shows animal mating choices more complex than once thought
When female tiger salamanders choose a mate, it turns out that size does matter -- tail size that is -- and that's not the only factor they weigh.

Problem solving and coping styles related to CPAP adherence
According to a research abstract that will be presented on Monday, June 8, at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, active problem solving strategies are associated with successful use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

Conflict-affected countries receive less aid dedicated to reproductive health
Low income, conflict-affected countries such as Afghanistan, Sudan and Somalia receive less development money for reproductive health than countries that are not experiencing conflict, according to a new study in this week's PLoS Medicine.

Thinnest superconducting metal created
A superconducting sheet of lead only two atoms thick, the thinnest superconducting metal layer ever created, has been developed by physicists at the University of Texas at Austin.

American Society for Microbiology honors Melissa B. Miller
The 2009 American Society for Microbiology Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Young Investigator Award is being presented to Melissa B.

American Society for Microbiology honors George M. Church
The 2009 American Society for Microbiology Promega Biotechnology Research Award is being presented to George M.

NIAID renews funding for National Emerging Infectious Diseases Research Network
NIAID today announced renewed funding for 10 previously established Regional Centers of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases Research.

Unexpected discovery can open a new chapter in the fight against tuberculosis
A close relative of the microorganism that causes tuberculosis in humans has been found to form spores.

To 300 million light years, and beyond -- a new way to measure cosmic distances
Ohio State University researchers have found a way to measure distances to objects three times farther away in outer space than previously possible, by extending a common measurement technique.

LSUHSC researchers first to document early signs for diabetes in kids as young as 7
Research conducted under the direction of Melinda Sothern, Ph.D., professor and director of health promotion at the LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Public Health, is the first to document previously unknown markers for obesity, heart disease and diabetes, collectively called the metabolic syndrome, in children as young as 7.

Relationship found between napping, hyperactivity, depression and anxiety
Napping may have a significant influence on young children's daytime functioning, according to a research abstract that will be presented on Monday, June 8, at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.

Radio telescopes extend astronomy's best 'yardstick'
Radio astronomers have used a direct, geometric technique to precisely measure the distance to a faraway galaxy, demonstrating a vital tool for determining the nature of the mysterious dark energy that pervades the nniverse.

American Society for Microbiology honors Deborah T. Hung
A 2009 American Society for Microbiology Merck Irving S. Sigal Memorial Award is being presented to Deborah T.

Muscle atrophy through thick but not thin
During desperate times, such as fasting or muscle wasting that afflicts cancer or AIDS patients, the body cannibalizes itself, atrophying and breaking down skeletal muscle proteins to liberate amino acids.

Excessive gaming associated with poor sleep hygiene and increased sleepiness
Computer/console gamers who play for more than seven hours a week, and who identify their gaming as an addiction, sleep less during the weekdays and experience greater sleepiness than casual or nongamers, according to a research abstract that will be presented on Monday, June 8, at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.

'Green energy' and the future of space propulsion
Alternative fuels, electric propulsion systems, fuel cells, and futuristic aerospace propulsion systems will take center stage in Denver at the Colorado Convention Center from Aug.

Top notch decisions in the developing airways bring insights into lung disease
In the normal lung, the airways are lined by a balanced mixture of ciliated, secretory and neuroendocrine cells which perform functions as diverse as air humidification, detoxification and clearance of environmental particles.

American Society for Microbiology honors James W. Snyder
The 2009 American Society for Microbiology TREK Diagnostic ABMM/ABMLI Professional Recognition Award is presented to James W.

Horse whisperers, lion tamers not needed: Scientists find genetic regions that soothe savage beasts
In what could be a breakthrough in animal breeding, a team of scientists from Germany, Russia and Sweden have discovered a set of genetic regions responsible for animal tameness.

Staying sharp: New study uncovers how people maintain cognitive function in old age
Not everyone declines in cognitive function with age. Elderly people who exercise at least once a week, have at least a high school education and a ninth grade literacy level, are not smokers and are more socially active are more likely to maintain their cognitive skills through their 70s and 80s, according to research published in the June 9, 2009, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Fatal brain disease at work well before symptoms appear
Scientists with the McKnight Brain Institute of the University of Florida have discovered why a paralyzing brain disorder speeds along more rapidly in some patients than others -- a finding that may finally give researchers an entry point toward an effective treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, often referred to as ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease.

American Society for Microbiology honors Lynne S. Garcia
The 2009 American Society for Microbiology bioMérieux Sonnenwirth Award for Leadership in Clinical Microbiology is being presented to Lynne S.

Manipulating light on a chip for quantum technologies
A team of physicists and engineers has demonstrated exquisite control of single particles of light -- photons -- on a silicon chip to make a major advance towards long-sought-after quantum technologies, including super-powerful quantum computers and ultra-precise measurements.

Interactive data eyeglasses
The data eyeglasses can read from the engineer's eyes which details he needs to see on the building plans.

Liraglutide better than exenatide at controlling blood glucose in diabetes
Liraglutide once daily is substantially better at controlling blood glucose in type 2 diabetes than is twice-daily exenatide (a currently marketed treatment).

New essays examine the use of fMRI to recognize deceit
The American Academy of Arts and Sciences has published a volume of essays,

Mobile DNA elements in woolly mammoth genome give new clues to mammalian evolution
The woolly mammoth died out several thousand years ago, but the genetic material they left behind is yielding new clues about the evolution of mammals.

Men who work with their female partners more likely to adhere to CPAP therapy
Men who work with their female partners while receiving continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnea are more likely to adhere to their treatment, according to a research abstract that will be presented on Monday at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.

American Society for Microbiology honors Jim C. Spain
The 2009 American Society for Microbiology Procter & Gamble Award in Applied and Environmental Microbiology is being presented to Jim C.

Ecologists identify birds struck in Hudson River crash as migratory Canada geese
The study, published online in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, will help managers better assess how to prevent such strikes in the future.

Racial variations in excessive daytime sleepiness depend on measurement
According to a research abstract that will be presented on Monday, June 8, at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, white Americans are more likely to report experiencing excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) more days per month than Asians, African-Americans and Hispanics, but African-Americans experience more severe EDS.

Enzyme necessary for DNA synthesis can also erase DNA
In this week's edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Uppsala University scientists describe a new mechanism behind an important process that causes a rapid reduction of DNA in the chromosomes of bacteria.

Management strategies for high-risk stroke patients poor in a majority of cases: study
A majority of high-risk stroke patients are less likely to meet clinical treatment targets to prevent repeat stroke or heart attacks compared to those with heart disease, suggesting the need to examine new therapeutic strategies, according to a study led by St.

Researchers work to boost effectiveness of the flu vaccine
Vaccines intended to help the body to fight off the flu bug may actually give the bug an edge, researchers say.

Women underrepresented in most cancer research
Women continue to be underenrolled in cancer clinical trials, according to a new review, published in the July 15, 2009, issue of Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.

4 risk factors raise probability of developing precursor of heart failure
High blood pressure, excessive weight, smoking and diabetes are strongly linked with increased size of the left ventricle, a major cause of heart failure.

UT Southwestern research reveals how cells tell time
The fuzzy pale mold that lines the glass tubes in Dr.

NIH funds regional center for biodefense and emerging infectious diseases research
A consortium of research centers in the tri-state region, including Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, has received a $46 million grant to conduct research on emerging infectious diseases.

Gas explosions: A new way to study phantom traffic jams
University of Alberta mechanical engineering professor Morris Flynn has revealed a new way to study phantom traffic jams.

Researchers identify structure of bacteria responsible for traveler's diarrhea
Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine, the Naval Medical Research Center and the National Institutes of Health, have solved the structure of thin hair-like fibers called

Visual system that detects movement, colors and textures created in Granada
Researchers from the University of Granada, basing their work on American models, have added a color -- and light-sensitive device to an artificial retina.

Sleep restriction results in weight gain despite decreases in appetite and consumption
According to a research abstract that will be presented on Monday, June 8, at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, in the presence of free access to food, sleep restricted subjects reported decrease in appetite, food cravings and food consumption; however, they gained weight over the course of the study.

Insomnia with objective short sleep duration in men is associated with increased mortality
Men with insomnia and sleep duration of six or fewer hours of nightly sleep are at an increased risk for mortality, according to a research abstract that will be presented on Monday, June 8, at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.

Genetic link found between anxiety, depression and insomnia
The genes that play a role in adolescent insomnia are the same as those involved in depression and anxiety, according to a research abstract that will be presented on Monday, June 8, at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.

JCI online early table of contents: June 8, 2009
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs and contact information for the following newsworthy papers to be published online, June 8, 2009, in the JCI, including: Gene therapy for hemophilia A mice; How a drug to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia is degraded; Learning about antitumor immune responses from human patients; When development of the eye fails to give clear sight; 'Notch'ing up our understanding of embryonic heart development; and others.

American Society for Microbiology honors Travis D. Hull
A 2009 American Society for Microbiology Raymond W. Sarber Award is being presented to Travis D.

Common chemotherapy drug triggers fatal allergic reactions
A chemotherapy drug that is supposed to help save cancer patients' lives, instead resulted in life-threatening and sometimes fatal allergic reactions.

Fossil bone bed helps reconstruct life along California's ancient coastline
Sharktooth Hill near Bakersfield, Calif., is the home of the most extensive marine bone bed in the world, a 100-square-mile layer of shark, seal, ray, whale, turtle and fish bones.

Multivitamins in pregnancy reduce risk of low birth weights
Prenatal multivitamin supplements are associated with a significantly reduced risk of babies with a low birth weight compared with prenatal iron-folic acid supplementation, found a new study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.
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