Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

May 01, 2010
Reading level of Medicaid renewal applications often too high
A study finds that 92 percent of Medicaid applications were written at or above the fifth-grade reading level, which could lead to gaps in insurance coverage for many children whose families have lower health literacy.

Giving DHA supplements to breastfeeding mothers
Early supplementation with DHA to lactating mothers with low dietary DHA is successful in increasing DHA status in very preterm infants.

Sleeping well at 100 years of age: Study searches for the secrets to healthy longevity
Sleep issues were examined in a sample of 15,638 adults aged 65 and older, including 3,927 between 90 and 99 years of age, and 2,794 who were 100 years of age and older.

AMD risk on the rise for Asians; retinal vein 'bypass' may help many CRVO patients
The May issue of Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, includes a surprising, first report on increasing rates of age-related macular degeneration among Asians, and describes an innovative

The challenge of immunizing a wary public
While national immunization rates remain high, vaccine refusals are troubling.

Climate change and its impact on human health
John Balbus, MD, MPH, Senior Advisor for Public Health at the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, will discuss the significant public health threats and opportunities presented by climate change and how children around the world may be affected.

Children's well-being another casualty of recession
The incidence of abusive head trauma among children has skyrocketed since the beginning of the recession in late 2007, according to research that will be presented Saturday, May 1, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

AGA presents cutting-edge research during DDW
Clinicians, researchers and scientists from around the world will gather for Digestive Disease Week 2010 (DDW), the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting, from May 1 to May 5, 2010, at the Ernest N.

Teens dangerously uninformed about OTC medication
The majority of teens say they have never heard of acetaminophen -- or what the appropriate dosing of it is even with access to the label instructions -- despite having taken the medication recently, according to a new University of Rochester Medical Center Study assessing teens' health literacy.

Social networking sites may provide clues to teens' sexual intentions
New research suggests that display of sexual references on teens' Facebook profiles is associated with their intention to initiate intercourse.

Living in a high-crime neighborhood may worsen children's asthma
After adjusting for the child's age, gender, family history of asthma and socioeconomic status, children were nearly twice as likely to have moderate/severe asthma if their caregivers reported high levels of stress or if the incidence of violent crime was high in their neighborhood.

Brief treatment can ease depression in mothers
New research suggests that depression is common in disadvantaged mothers, well beyond the postpartum period.

Fighting fungal infections with bacteria
A bacterial pathogen can communicate with yeast to block the development of drug-resistant yeast infections, say Irish scientists writing in the May issue of Microbiology.

Children living in apartments with nonsmoking adults still exposed
The majority of children living in apartments are exposed to secondhand smoke, even when they don't live with smokers.

Dietary habits of teenagers could be better
Adolescents, especially those who are not very physically active, eat too much sweet and fatty foods and not enough fruits and vegetables.

US Latinos have high rates of developing vision loss and certain eye conditions
Latinos have higher rates of developing visual impairment, blindness, diabetic eye disease, and cataracts than non-Hispanic whites, researchers found.

Researchers recommend pregnant women take 4,000 IU vitamin D a day
Taking vitamin D supplements during pregnancy is not only safe for mother and baby, but also can prevent preterm labor/births and infections.

Beyond postpartum -- treating depression in mothers of older children
Depression among economically disadvantaged mothers could last well beyond the postpartum period and become a chronic condition, suggests a new study by researchers at Yale School of Medicine.

Commentary suggests alternatives to routine use of OTC cold/cough meds in children
Despite their widespread use by parents and caregivers, over-the-counter cold and cough medicines have carried a warning by the FDA since 2008, and still have the potential to cause serious adverse events in infants and children.

Olive oil could guard against developing ulcerative colitis
Eating more olive oil could help prevent ulcerative colitis, according to a new study coordinated by medical researchers at the University of East Anglia.

Probiotics help extremely premature infants gain weight
Extremely low-birthweight infants who received feedings supplemented with probiotics had better weight gain than infants who were not given the supplements, according to a randomized, controlled, double-blind study to be presented Saturday, May 1, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Volume 3 in the Global E-Governance Series published
Volume 3 in the Global E-Governance Series, brings together the contributions of acknowledged experts from all over the world, who have presented papers and participated in discussions at three recent conferences on e-government, the role of the CIO (Chief Information Officer) and e-governance.

Access to primary care may reduce surgeries among children
The availability of surgeons may increase the likelihood that children will receive optional ear and throat surgeries, while the availability of primary care providers, such as pediatricians and family physicians, may decrease the likelihood of children undergoing these procedures.

New commentary suggests alternatives to routine use of OTC cold/cough meds in children
Despite their widespread use by parents and caregivers, over-the-counter cold and cough medicines have carried a warning by the FDA since 2008, and still have the potential to cause serious adverse events in infants and children.

Lung cancer risk particularly high for heart and liver transplant recipients
Heart and liver transplant recipients are at particularly high risk of developing lung cancer after receiving the donated organ

Comprehensive asthma care keeps kids out of the hospital
A comprehensive, patient-centered approach to asthma care that includes education, referrals to specialists and home visits not only improves patients' health but also has tremendous potential to decrease health care costs.
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