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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 18, 2010


Whitfield to receive GSA's 2010 Distinguished Mentorship in Gerontology Award
The Gerontological Society of America -- the nation's largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging -- has chosen Keith Whitfield, Ph.D., of Duke University as the 2010 recipient of the Distinguished Mentorship in Gerontology Award.
Are school wellness policies stuck in the Ice Age?
The Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act, 2004, requires that all school districts have a Wellness Policy if they participate in federal school meal programs.
Deadly effect of arsenic in drinking water measured in massive study
More than 20 percent of deaths in a study of 12,000 Bangladeshis were attributable to arsenic exposure from contaminated drinking water, new research reports.
New role for ancient clock
The pancreas has its own molecular clock. Now, for the first time, a Northwestern University study has shown this ancient circadian clock regulates the production of insulin.
Awake sedation for brain surgery may shorten hospital stay
The recovery time and cost of brain-tumor surgery might be reduced if surgery is performed while patients are awake during part of the procedure, according to a new study.
Scientists see billions of miles away
A large group of scientists, including Jay Pasachoff, Bryce Babcock and Steven Souza at Williams College, reveal the character of one of the most distant objects in the solar system in a scientific paper to appear in the June 17 issue of the journal Nature.
Like fireflies, earthquakes may fire in synchrony
Scientists have well established that big earthquakes can trigger other big quakes by transferring stress along a single fault, as successive earthquakes in Turkey and Indonesia have shown.
Silicon Valley energy summit at Stanford on June 25
The 2010 Energy Summit is hosted by the Silicon Valley Leadership Group and the Stanford University Precourt Energy Efficiency Center.
CERN Council opens the door to greater integration
At its 155th session today, the CERN Council strongly congratulated the Laboratory on the excellent performance of the LHC since its start-up for physics on March 30 this year.
Second Ohio State cancer drug begins clinical trials testing
For the second time within a year, an experimental drug invented by cancer researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -- Arthur G.
Gauging safety in the electronic age
Engineers at the University of Leicester are taking the unusual step of learning from architecture in order to design safer electrical systems.
Fly cells flock together, follow the light
Scientists at Johns Hopkins report using a laser beam to activate a protein that makes a cluster of fruit fly cells act like a school of fish turning in social unison, following the lead of the one stimulated with light.
Springer Open Choice uptake affects 2011 journal pricing
Springer has analyzed the uptake of its open access option Open Choice for articles published in 2009 and is pleased to share its impact on 2011 pricing.
Scopus data play key role in statistical study at Kyoto University
Scopus announced today that Kyoto University is employing the former's data and functions in a study performed by Dr.
Children with home computers likely to have lower test scores
Around the country and throughout the world, politicians and education activists have sought to eliminate the
Surveillance may be suitable treatment option for patients with low-risk prostate cancer
Active surveillance or watchful waiting might be sufficient treatment for patients with prostate cancer that has a low risk of progression, according to a new study published online June 18 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.
Scientist links increase in greenhouse gases to changes in ocean currents
By examining 800,000-year-old polar ice, scientists increasingly are learning how the climate has changed since the last ice melt and that carbon dioxide has become more abundant in the Earth's atmosphere.
The ultimate cold case: Anthropologist 'bones up' on site of ancient invasion
The University of Alberta's Sandra Garvie-Lok can't tell exactly how the victim on her table died, but she has a good idea.
Increased likelihood of male death from disease
Research currently being undertaken at the University of Leicester may identify reasons underlying an increased risk of abdominal aortic aneurysms in men.
Gladstone's Shinya Yamanaka wins Kyoto prize
Shinya Yamanaka, M.D., Ph.D., of the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease and Kyoto University, has won the 2010 Kyoto Prize for Advanced Technology.
Buckwalter wins GSA's 2010 Doris Schwartz Gerontological Nursing Research Award
The Gerontological Society of America -- the nation's largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging -- has chosen Kathleen Buckwalter, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., of the University of Iowa as the 2010 recipient of the Doris Schwartz Gerontological Nursing Research Award.
Model predicts individual's vitamin D needs
Your skin tone and the amount of sunshine you receive -- in addition to what foods you eat -- all can influence the amount of vitamin D that your body has on hand for optimum health.
Therapeutic potential of embryonic stem cells
Scientists at Children's Memorial Research Center at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine investigated the expression of key members of the Nodal embryonic signaling pathway, critical to maintaining pluripotency, in hiPSC and hESC cell lines.
Sex lives of patients are negatively affected by RA and SLE
Systemic lupus erythematosus patients from Brazil and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients from France report that their rheumatic conditions negatively affect their emotional relationships and sex lives, according to research presented today at EULAR 2010, the Annual Congress of the European League Against Rheumatism in Rome, Italy.
New 2009 Impact Factors soar for newest Cell Press journals
In the year since their 2008 preliminary ranking, Cell Press journals Cell Stem Cell and Cell Host and Microbe saw their Impact Factors surge, according to new data released in the 2009 Journal Citation Reports published by ThomsonReuters.
Vitamin D deficiency confirmed as common across a range of rheumatic conditions
Two separate studies have shown that vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with a range of rheumatic diseases, with over half of all patients having below the
Tinetti wins GSA's 2010 Maxwell A. Pollack Award for productive aging
The Gerontological Society of America -- the nation's largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging -- has chosen Mary Tinetti, M.D., M.P.H., of Yale University as the 2010 recipient of the Maxwell A.
Prize-winning budgeting model aims for more effective marketing spending
The 2009-2010 INFORMS Society for Marketing Science/Marketing Science Institute Practice Prize was presented today to professors at the University of Passau and the University at Kiel for research that supported Bayer Healthcare AG in their marketing investment planning for the primary care business of the company's pharmaceutical product portfolio in five European markets.
City Tech to host International Solar Sailing Symposium July 20-22
Top scientists from 14 countries will convene at New York City College of Technology from July 20 through July 22 for the Second International Symposium on Solar Sailing.
Partners grieve rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis as much as patients
Partners of patients newly diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis are equally emotionally affected by the diagnosis and go through the same grieving process as the patients themselves, according to the results of a study presented today at EULAR 2010, the Annual Congress of the European League Against Rheumatism in Rome, Italy.
Student scientists and engineers develop award-winning rover
Undergraduates from Arizona State University and the University of Maryland took first place in one of the nation's premier astronautics design competitions for university-level engineering students, the 2010 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts Academic Linkage contest held June 6-10 in Cocoa Beach, Fla.
Love ballad leaves women more open to a date
If you're having trouble getting a date, French researchers suggest that picking the right soundtrack could improve the odds.
Women who consume large amounts of tea have increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis
Women who drink tea have an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with those who drink none (p=0.04), according to results presented today at EULAR 2010, the Annual Congress of the European League Against Rheumatism in Rome, Italy.
NASA's TRMM Satellite sees Tropical Depression 2-E dissipating
The National Hurricane Center issued the final advisory on the Eastern Pacific Ocean's second tropical depression (2-E) on June 17 at 11 a.m.
The key role of the oceans' subpolar regions in the climate control of the tropics is confirmed
First registers of the evolution of Northern Pacific and Southern Atlantic sea-surface temperatures, dating from the Pliocene Era -- some 3.65 million years ago -- to the present.
SAGE Insight shines spotlight on research
Leading academic and professional publisher SAGE today announced the launch of a new online resource that will put the spotlight on research published across its scholarly journals.
UM scientists design intelligent 3-D simulation robots to compete in the Robocup 2010
Ubbo Visser, research associate professor of computer science at the University of Miami will describe the architecture of the multiagent system and discuss motion capture techniques for graphical animation, at the RoboCup 2010 Symposium and participate in the RoboCup World Championship with the RoboCanes, designed by the AI & Games group at UM, one of only two US teams participating in the 3-D simulation soccer league.
Genealogy may affect clinical differences in systemic lupus erythmatosus patients
The effects of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may differ based on the individual patient's genealogical heritage, according to results of a new study presented today at EULAR 2010, the Annual Congress of the European League Against Rheumatism in Rome, Italy.
NASA watching System 94L over Lesser Antilles for development
Tropical waves can't escape the view of satellites, and System 94L which is associated with a strong tropical wave in western Atlantic Ocean and over the Lesser Antilles is being watched for development.
Risk of death increases with exposure to arsenic in drinking water (HEALS study)
Residents of Bangladesh exposed to well water with arsenic concentrations as low as 10μg/L are at potentially increased risk of death, finds an article published online first in the Lancet.
Retooling the ocean conveyor belt
In a paper in the June 18 issue of Science, a Duke University oceanographer reviews the growing body of evidence that suggests it's time to rethink the ocean conveyor belt model.
Teenagers want to finish their studies and leave home
Two researchers from the University of Santiago de Compostela have studied the relationship between teenagers' goals and antisocial behavior.
Oceanographers call for more ocean observing in Antarctica
Scientists argue that ocean-observing systems are the way to understand climate change in Antarctica -- and sooner would be better than later.
10 risk factors are associated with 90 percent of risk of stroke (INTERSTROKE study)
The INTERSTROKE study, published online first and in an upcoming Lancet, shows that a total of 10 risk factors (including high blood pressure, smoking, and waist-to-hip ratio) are associated with 90 percent of the risk of stroke.
Aerogeophysical survey provides promising prospects of economic development in Afghanistan
Data gathered and compiled by NRL and USGS scientists during geophysical survey flights over Afghanistan reveal potentially rich natural resource sediment basins and mineral deposits and provide hydrologic and geospatial referenced imagery to support infrastructure and economic development.
Over 2 billion hours served
The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, located at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, has run over two billion processor-hours of computations at a mind-boggling speed of over 557 trillion calculations a second as it enables scientists and engineers to conduct cutting-edge research in just weeks or months rather than years.
Sex lives of patients are negatively affected by rheumatoid arthritis and SLE
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients from Brazil and Rheumatoid Arthritis patients from France report that their rheumatic conditions negatively affect their emotional relationships and sex lives, according to research presented today at EULAR 2010, the Annual Congress of the European League Against Rheumatism in Rome, Italy.
Tropical Storm Blas bearing bouts of strong convection in NASA imagery
Tropical Storm Blas is on a west-northwesterly track in the open waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean, and a NASA satellite flying overhead noticed some strong areas of convection in the storm.
TGen partner, PBS-Bio, makes first breakthrough drug analysis
Predictive Biomarker Sciences Inc. has completed its first drug analysis, enabling Canadian biotech company PharmaGap Inc. to significantly advance a potentially significant anti-cancer medication.
Expression of certain transporter proteins may predict resistance to drug therapy
The expression of a transporter protein called the breast cancer resistance protein in rheumatoid arthritis patients may indicate higher disease activity and could be a barrier to the effectiveness of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, according to the results of a study presented today at EULAR 2010, the Annual Congress of the European League Against Rheumatism in Rome, Italy.
Risk of heart attack in patients
Rheumatoid arthritis patients face a two-fold increased risk of suffering a myocardial infarction (MI, heart attack) versus the general population, which is comparable to the increased risk of MI seen in diabetes patients, according to results of a new study presented today at EULAR 2010, the Annual Congress of the European League Against Rheumatism in Rome, Italy.
Lipsitz to receive GSA's 2010 Joseph T. Freeman Award
The Gerontological Society of America -- the nation's largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging -- has chosen Lewis Lipsitz, M.D., of Hebrew SeniorLife as the 2010 recipient of the Joseph T.
Sparks to receive Liebig Medal from International Union of Soil Sciences
This summer, Donald Sparks, S. Hallock du Pont Chair in Plant and Soil Sciences at the University of Delaware and director of the Delaware Environmental Institute, will receive the Liebig Award from the International Union of Soil Sciences for outstanding contributions in soil science research, revealing new discoveries, techniques, inventions, or materials related to soils and the environment.
Chinese systemic lupus erythematosus data reveal differences in epidemiology across continents
The Chinese Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Treatment and Research Group announced interim epidemiological information on SLE patients in China today at EULAR 2010, the Annual Congress of the European League Against Rheumatism in Rome, Italy.
Saint Louis University investigators perfect new version of blood-regulator thrombin
In research led by a Saint Louis University investigator, molecular biologists have discovered a way to harness the enzyme thrombin's anti-blood clotting properties.
Coffee or tea: Enjoy both in moderation for heart benefits
Both high and moderate amounts of tea are linked with reduced heart disease deaths.
Tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology
The following are tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology:

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