Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

July 05, 2010
Research helps predict future impact of climate change
A new study, involving academics at the University of Sheffield, has accurately measured for the first time the current carbon cycles in the world.

FIT4Green ICT project aims to save up to 20 percent of energy
The VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland is participating in an EU project FIT4Green which targets to provide at least 20 percent savings in direct server and network devices energy consumption and induce an additional 30 percent savings due to reduced cooling needs.

Adolescent cyberbullies and their victims may have physical, mental health problems
Adolescent victims and perpetrators of electronic bullying appear more likely to report having psychiatric and physical symptoms and problems, according to a report in the June issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Abused children appear likely to have mental disorders as young adults
Abuse and neglect during childhood appear to be associated with increased rates of mood, anxiety and substance use disorders among young adults, according to a report in the June issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Virtual food causes stress in patients affected by eating disorders
Food presented in a virtual reality environment causes the same emotional responses as real food.

Antagonizing atherosclerosis
Antibody-producing B cells promote atherosclerosis in mice, according to a study to be published online on July 5 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Breath of the Earth: Cycling carbon through terrestrial ecosystems
Two recent international studies are poised to change the way scientists view the crucial relationship between Earth's climate and the carbon cycle.

Scientists reveal the mystery of sudden cardiac death
Scientists at the University of Manchester have solved a mystery connected with why people die from sudden cardiac arrest during sleep -- potentially saving thousands of lives.

New tool to rule out coronary heart disease in primary care
A simple new rule can help primary care physicians rule out coronary heart disease in patients with chest pain, states a study published in CMAJ.

First step to new therapy for chronic bowel disease
Scientists associated with VIB and Ghent University have discovered that A20 protein plays an important protective role in diseases associated with chronic bowel inflammation.

Digital embryo gains wings
Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory have captured fruit fly development on film, creating the Fly Digital Embryo.

Depression symptoms show little change during the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease
Researchers at Rush University Medical Center found that depressive symptoms show little change during the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease.

Cocoa flavanols improve vascular and blood pressure measures for coronary artery disease patients
A new study by UCSF cardiologists and researchers found that high concentrations of cocoa flavanols decrease blood pressure, improve the health of blood vessels and increase the number of circulating blood-vessel-forming cells in patients with heart disease.

Study finds higher STD rates among users of erectile dysfunction drugs
Physicians who prescribe erectile dysfunction drugs for their male patients should be sure to discuss the importance of safer sex practices, even with older patients: that is an important implication of a report in the July 6 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.

Olaparib shows promise, new concept for treating patients with cancer and BRCA gene mutations
The new drug olaparib has anti-tumor activity in carriers of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations who have advanced ovarian or breast cancer, according to the findings of two proof-of-concept trials.

Plasma protein appears to be associated with development and severity of Alzheimer's disease
Higher concentrations of clusterin, a protein in the blood plasma, appears to be associated with the development, severity and progression of Alzheimer's disease, according to a report in the June issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Planck unveils the universe -- now and then
ESA's Planck mission has delivered its first all-sky image. It not only provides new insight into the way stars and galaxies form but also tells us how the universe itself came to life after the Big Bang.

ESHRE study shows new PGS method can predict chromosomal abnormalities
The efficacy of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) has been one of the most hotly disputed subjects in assisted reproduction over the past few years.

A new opportunity for hepatitis C research
At TWINCORE, researchers are now adapting the HCV to mice, thus enabling immunologists and vaccine researchers to take the next steps against this illness in the future.

Embargoed news from Annals of Internal Medicine
Below is information about two early online releases and two articles being published in the July 6 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.

Salmon in hot water
Rearing juvenile salmon at the relatively high temperature of 16 C causes skeletal deformities in the fish.

Delayed school start time associated with improvements in adolescent behaviors
A short delay in school start time appears to be associated with significant improvements in adolescent alertness, mood and health, according to a report in the July issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Stroke incidence in urban Tanzania significantly higher than in developed countries
The incidence of strokes in rural Tanzania is similar to that reported in developed countries, but rates in urban Tanzania are almost three times higher.

Cocoa flavanols could more than double cells associated with repair and maintenance of blood vessels, according to Mars Inc. research
New findings indicate that cocoa flavanols may be an important part of a healthy diet for people with cardiovascular disease, which affects more than 80 million Americans, according to research by a team of internationally-renowned researchers, including scientists from Mars Inc.

Rising inequality in the UK undermines mobility and social cohesion
New research, presented at a major international conference in London, demonstrates how inequality in education, skills and incomes reduces opportunity and undermines social cohesion.

Methods madness hits Oxford
Science is not all about people in white lab coats blowing things up.

Antioxidants do help arteries stay healthy
Long-term supplementation with dietary antioxidants has beneficial effects on sugar and fat metabolism, blood pressure and arterial flexibility in patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors.

Heart patients with anxiety disorder experience more cardiovascular events, deaths
Among patients with heart disease, anxiety disorders appear to be associated with a higher risk of stroke, heart attack, heart failure and death, according to a report in the July issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Kids now see fewer television ads for sweets and beverages, but more for fast food
Children saw fewer television advertisements for certain foods, including those for sweets and beverages, in 2007 compared with 2003, according to a report posted online today that will appear in the September print issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Genotyping technologies help keep UK barley market competitive
By exploiting technology originally used in human genome studies, a public-private partnership program is changing the way in which commercial barley breeding is being conducted.

Depression may nearly double risk of dementia
A new study shows that having depression may nearly double your risk of developing dementia later in life.

Fetal X-ray exposure interferes with memory in adulthood
Learning and memory impairments are important contributors to the disability associated with schizophrenia.

Revolutionary therapy slows tumor growth in advanced breast cancer, Penn research reports
A novel therapy designed to attack tumors in patients with a genetic mutation in either BRCA1 or BRCA2, slowed tumor growth in 85 percent of advanced breast cancer patients treated in a small study, researchers report in the July 6 issue of the Lancet.

Difficult childhoods lead to teenage drinking
An African study has found a link between a difficult childhood and alcohol consumption as a teenager.

Combining sex and drugs reduces rock and roll
Sharing a bottle of red wine may seem like the best recipe for a romantic interlude.
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