Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

November 21, 2010
Air flows in mechanical device reveal secrets of speech pathology
A mechanical model of human vocal folds and new observations by researchers at George Washington University may lead to new devices to help people afflicted with vocal fold paralysis -- as described today at the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics (DFD) meeting in Long Beach, Calif.

Rare disease reveals new path for creating stem cells
Researchers have found that by mimicking a rare genetic disorder in a dish, they can rewind the internal clock of a mature cell and drive it back into an adult stem-cell stage.

Genes link sexual maturity to body fat in women
An international group of scientists, including researchers at the Medical Research Council, has discovered 30 genes that control the age at which girls reach sexual maturity.

Enhancing the efficiency of wind turbines
New ideas for enhancing the efficiency of wind turbines are being presented today at the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics meeting in Long Beach, Calif.

Jet engine too hot? Schedule an MRI!
Researchers at Stanford University are using MRI to improve jet engine efficiency -- work described today at the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics (DFD) meeting in Long Beach, Calif.

Should airplanes look like birds?
Airplanes do not look much like birds, but should they?

Scientists call for protection of Australia's subtropic seas
Leading scientists and marine managers have called for a greater national effort to protect vital 1,000-km stretches of ocean bordering the middle of Australia's eastern and western coastlines.

Hebrew University research carries cautionary warning for future stem cell applications
Research work carried out at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem arouses a cautionary warning in the growing field of the development of stem cells as a means for future treatment of patients through replacement of diseased or damaged tissues by using the patient's own stem cells.

Jump rope aerodynamics
Engineers at Princeton University have built a robotic jump rope device and used it to study the underlying physics of jumping rope, which they describe today at the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics meeting in Long Beach, Calif.

Scientists discover genes linking puberty timing to body fat in women
Researchers at King's College London's Department of Twin Research have discovered, as part of a large international consortium, 30 new genes that control the age of sexual maturation in women, the Journal Nature Genetics publishes today.

Simple rubber device mimics complex bird songs
A team of scientists at Harvard University has reproduced many of the characteristics of real bird song with a simple physical model made of a rubber tube -- work presented today at the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics meeting in Long Beach, Calif.

Genes link puberty timing and body fat in women
Scientists have discovered 30 new genes that control the age of sexual maturation in women.

IVCC develops new public health insecticides
The Innovative Vector Control Consortium has received $50 million from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to continue its work to develop new insecticides for the improved control of mosquitoes and other insects which transmit malaria, dengue and other neglected tropical diseases.

Global CO2 emissions back on the rise in 2010
Global carbon dioxide emissions -- the main contributor to global warming -- show no sign of abating and may reach record levels in 2010, according to a study led by the University of Exeter.

Stanford researchers first to turn normal cells into 3-D cancers in tissue culture dishes
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have successfully transformed normal human tissue into three-dimensional cancers in a tissue culture dish for the first time.

In the test tube, teams reconstruct a cancer cell's beginning
Scientists recreate the very first step by which a normal cell transforms itself into a cancer cell.

Risk of acute kidney injury varies with kidney filtration rate and levels of protein in urine
An article published online first by the Lancet shows that the risk of acute kidney injury, the rate at which kidneys filter blood, and the levels of protein in urine are all closely interrelated.

How hummingbirds fight the wind
Hummingbirds rank among the world's most accomplished hovering animals, but how do they manage it in gusty winds?
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