Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

June 19, 2011
New genes for risk and progression of rare brain disease identified
There are new genetic clues on risk factors and biological causes of a rare neurodegenerative disease called progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), according to a new study from an international genetics team led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Single gene controls development of many forms of polycystic disease
A single gene is central in the development of several forms of polycystic kidney and liver disease, Yale School of Medicine researchers report in the June 19 issue of Nature Genetics.

Mimicking nature at the nanoscale: Selective transport across a biomimetic nanopore
Researchers at Delft University of Technology and the University of Basel have established a biomimetic nanopore that provides a unique test and measurement platform for the way that proteins move into a cell's nucleus.

50-year search for calcium channel ends
After decades of failed efforts, researchers have discovered, through a combination of digital database mining and laboratory assays, the linchpin protein that drives mitochondria's calcium machinery.

Climate change disasters could be predicted
Climate change disasters, such as the melting of the Greenland ice sheet, dieback of the Amazon rainforest or collapse of the Atlantic overturning circulation, could be predicted according to University of Exeter research.

Mayo Clinic researchers use human vaccine to cure prostate cancer in mice
Mayo Clinic investigators and collaborators from the United Kingdom cured well-established prostate tumors in mice using a human vaccine with no apparent side effects.

New approach to cancer vaccines proves successful in early studies
University of Leeds researchers, funded by Cancer Research UK, have used a library of DNA to create a vaccine that could be used to treat cancer, according to a study published in Nature Medicine.

Study of biomarker development in mice provides a roadmap for a similar approach in humans
Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have demonstrated in mice that the performance of a novel biomarker-development pipeline using targeted mass spectrometry is robust enough to support the use of an analogous approach in humans.

Heart disease beats breast cancer as the biggest killer
Breast cancer accounts for almost a third of all cancer cases reported in women.

Proteins used to map the aging process
Loss of muscle mass is not only associated with disease, such as HIV and cancer, but also with the normal aging process.

New insights on an old material will enable design of better polymer batteries, water purification
Virginia Tech research groups have combined forces to devise a way to measure Nafion's internal structure and, in the process, have discovered how to manipulate this structure to enhance the material's applications.

Arctic snow harbors deadly assassin
Heavy and prolonged snowfall can bring about unexpected conditions that encourage fungal growth, leading to the death of plants in the Arctic, according to experts.

Atmospheric carbon dioxide buildup unlikely to spark abrupt climate change
New research lends support to recent studies that suggest abrupt climate change is the result of alterations in ocean circulation uniquely associated with ice ages, not from atmospheric carbon dioxide.

Possible susceptibility genes found in neurodegenerative disorder
An international research team, co-led by scientists at Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida, have discovered three potential susceptibility genes for development of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), a rare neurodegenerative disease that causes symptoms similar to those of Parkinson's disease but is resistant to Parkinson's medications.
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