Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

December 11, 2011
B cell receptor inhibitor causes chronic lymphocytic leukemia remission
A new, targeted approach to treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia has produced durable remissions in a Phase I/II clinical trial for patients with relapsed or resistant disease, investigators report at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology.

Study favors as-needed treatment over maintenance therapy for patients with follicular lymphoma
Asymptomatic patients diagnosed with non-bulky follicular lymphoma, a slow-growing type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, have traditionally been watched for signs or symptoms of disease progression and then treated with a combination of rituximab and chemotherapy or rituximab alone for select cases.

Scar findings could lead to new therapies, Stanford researchers say
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine report that they have identified the molecular pathway through which physical force contributes to scarring in mice.

Rare genetic disorder provides clues to development of the pancreas
A rare genetic disorder has given researchers at the University of Exeter a surprising insight into how the pancreas develops.

Penn study points to novel way to improve outcomes from umbilical cord blood transplants
A new method to boost the number of immune cells in umbilical cord blood prior to cord blood transplants for cancer patients appears to lead to a quicker rebuilding of a new immune system in the patient's body than with a conventional cord blood transplant procedure, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania that will be presented today at the 53rd American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting.

Novel experimental agent is highly active in CLL patients, interim study shows
An interim analysis of a phase Ib/II clinical trial indicates that a novel experimental agent for chronic lymphocytic leukemia is highly active and well tolerated in patients who have relapsed and are resistant to other therapy.

A lake fauna in a shot-glass
Danish research team leads the way for future biodiversity monitoring using DNA traces in the environment to keep track of threatened wildlife - a lake water sample the size of a shot-glass can contain evidence of an entire lake fauna.

Emerging lymphoma and myeloma treatments focus on improving individual patient response
Lymphoma and myeloma are both malignant diseases that arise from lymphocytes, a subset of blood cells, and commonly involve lymph nodes and the bone marrow.

BGI study results on resequencing 50 accessions of rice cast new light on molecular breeding
BGI study results on resequencing 50 accessions of rice cast new light on molecular breeding.

Multi-purpose photonic chip paves the way to programmable quantum processors
A multi-purpose optical chip which generates, manipulates and measures entanglement and mixture -- two quantum phenomena which are essential driving forces for tomorrow's quantum computers -- has been developed by researchers from the University of Bristol's Center for Quantum Photonics.

Penn researchers repair immune system in leukemia patients following chemotherapy
A new treatment using leukemia patients' own infection-fighting cells appears to protect them from infections and cancer recurrence following treatment with fludarabine-based chemotherapy, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania that will be presented today at the 53rd American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting.

Scripps research scientists elevate little-studied cellular mechanism to potential drug target
For years, science has generally considered the phosphorylation of proteins -- the insertion of a phosphorous group into a protein that turns it on or off -- as perhaps the factor regulating a range of cellular processes from cell metabolism to programmed cell death.

Studies assess hydroxyurea therapy and pre-operative transfusions for patients with SCD
Research assessing the safety and efficacy of hydroxyurea therapy in pediatric patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and the use of pre-operative transfusions for patients with SCD who undergo low- and moderate-risk elective surgery will be presented today at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology.

Mayo Clinic: How patients will respond to immunomodulator therapy for multiple myeloma
Research on the same protein that was a primary mediator of the birth defects caused by thalidomide now holds hope in the battle against multiple myeloma, says the study's senior investigator, Keith Stewart, M.B., Ch.B. of Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

The world's smallest steam engine
A heat engine measuring only a few micrometers works as well as its larger counterpart, although it splutters.
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