Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

January 30, 2012
Mouse to elephant? Just wait 24 million generations
Scientists have for the first time measured how fast large-scale evolution can occur in mammals, showing it takes 24 million generations for a mouse-sized animal to evolve to the size of an elephant.

Alcohol consumption and risk of colon cancer in people with a family history of such cancer
A study based on more than 87,000 women and 47,000 men in the Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, looks at whether there is a link between colon cancer and alcohol, and if so at what level of consumption, and the importance of a family history of the disease.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Protein Folding in the Cell
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Protein Folding in the Cell.

Stanford scientists turn skin cells into neural precusors, bypassing stem-cell stage
Mouse skin cells can be converted directly into cells that become the three main parts of the nervous system, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

In lab, Pannexin1 restores tight binding of cells that is lost in cancer
By studying tumor cell behavior in a novel

Filling R&D gaps key to succeeding in NTD control and elimination goals by 2020
On the occasion of today's high-level event in London, 'Uniting to Combat Neglected Tropical Diseases,' organized in support of the new World Health Organization Neglected Tropical Disease 2020 Roadmap, the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative welcomes the commitments from various partners and emphasizes that filling the major gaps in research and development for new treatment and diagnostic tools is key to effectively support elimination or control of targeted NTDs by 2020.

Development of the chimpanzee determined by the X factor
Danish scientists have captured and sequenced the complete exomes of 12 chimpanzees and present the largest set of protein-coding polymorphism to date.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Mitosis: Spindle Assembly and Function
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Mitosis: Spindle Assembly and Function.

Many bodies make 1 coherent burst of light
In a flash, the world changed for Tim Noe -- and for physicists who study what they call many-body problems.

Learning-based tourism an opportunity for industry expansion
New research suggests that major growth in the travel, leisure and tourism industry in the coming century may be possible as more people begin to define recreation as a learning and educational opportunity -- a way to explore new ideas and cultures, art, science and history.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Protein Phosphatases
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Protein Phosphatases.

UCSB researchers discover the processes leading to acute myeloid leukemia
Researchers at UC Santa Barbara have discovered a molecular pathway that may explain how a particularly deadly form of cancer develops.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Tyrosine Kinase Signaling in Cancer, Disease, and Development
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Tyrosine Kinase Signaling in Cancer, Disease, & Development.

Mom's love good for child's brain
School-age children whose mothers nurtured them early in life have brains with a larger hippocampus, a key structure important to learning, memory and response to stress.

Poisonous morning hygiene
Professor Dr. Georg Pohnert of the University Jena and colleagues did find out how the microalgae

Running robots
University of Delaware professor works to design faster robots, modeling their movement on animals.

Research at Rice University leads to nanotube-based device for communication, security, sensing
Researchers at Rice University are using carbon nanotubes as the critical component of a robust terahertz polarizer that could accelerate the development of new security and communication devices, sensors and noninvasive medical imaging systems as well as fundamental studies of low-dimensional condensed matter systems.

Shakespeare's skill 'more in grammar than in words'
William Shakespeare's mastery of the English language is displayed more in the grammar he used than in his words, according to a researcher at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Nucleic Acid Enzymes
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Nucleic Acid Enzymes.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Biology of the Immune System
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Biology of the Immune System.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Lipid Droplets: Metabolic Consequences of the Storage of Neutral Lipids
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Lipid Droplets: Metabolic Consequences of the Storage of Neutral Lipids.

Smart paint could revolutionize structural safety
An innovative low-cost smart paint that can detect microscopic faults in wind turbines, mines and bridges before structural damage occurs is being developed by researchers at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland.

Reducing ion exchange particles to nano-size shows big potential
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory have successfully shown that they can replace useful little particles of an ion exchange material with even tinier nano-sized particles, making them even more useful for a variety of applications.

Detailed picture of how myoV 'walks' along actin tracks
A new study in the Journal of General Physiology uses state-of-the-art fluorescence microscopy to provide a striking 3-D picture of how class V myosins (myoV)

Cutting off the oxygen supply to serious diseases
A new family of proteins which regulate the human body's 'hypoxic response' to low levels of oxygen has been discovered by scientists at Barts Cancer Institute at Queen Mary, University of London and The University of Nottingham.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Transcriptional Regulation During Cell Growth, Differentiation, and Development
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Transcriptional Regulation During Cell Growth, Differentiation, and Development.

UCLA researchers indentify a cell-permeable peptide that inhibits hepatitis C
Researchers from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a cell-permeable peptide that inhibits a hepatitis C virus protein and blocks viral replication, which can lead to liver cancer.

New guidelines to prevent infection in minor surgery
New guidelines from the Healthcare Infection Society aimed at minimizing surgical infection in day centers and primary care are now published in the Journal of Hospital Infection.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: The Growth Hormone/prolactin Family in Biology & Disease
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Growth Hormone / Prolactin Family in Biology & Disease.

Dealing with stress: New research highlights the survival skills of disease-causing E. coli
A team of researchers at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute investigates disease-causing E. coli strains known as APEC.

Barrett's patients who smoke twice as likely to develop oesophageal cancer
Smoking doubles the risk of developing oesophageal cancer in people with Barrett's Oesophagus, according to scientists at Queen's University Belfast and the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry.

Overweight mothers who smoke while pregnant can damage baby's heart
Mothers-to-be who are both overweight and smoke during their pregnancy risk damaging their baby's developing heart, finds research published online in Heart.

A glass of milk a day could benefit your brain
Pouring at least one glass of milk each day could not only boost your intake of much-needed key nutrients, but it could also positively impact your brain and mental performance, according to a recent study in the International Dairy Journal.

Majority of self-harming adolescents don't receive a mental health assessment in ERs
A national study of Medicaid data shows most young people who present to emergency departments with deliberate self-harm are discharged to the community, without receiving an emergency mental health assessment.

Columbia Journalism, Stanford Engineering receive $30 million from David and Helen Gurley Brown
Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism and Stanford University's School of Engineering today announced a $30 million gift from longtime Cosmopolitan magazine editor and author Helen Gurley Brown to establish the David and Helen Gurley Brown Institute for Media Innovation.

Earth's energy budget remained out of balance despite unusually low solar activity
A new NASA study underscores the fact that greenhouse gases generated by human activity -- not changes in solar activity -- are the primary force driving global warming.

DOE Joint Genome Institute 7th Annual Meeting on March 20-22, 2012
The 7th Annual Genomics of Energy and Environment Meeting of the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute will take place at the Marriott in Walnut Creek, Calif. on March 20-22, 2012.

The Arctic is already suffering the effects of a dangerous climate change
Two decades after the United Nations established the Framework Convention on Climate Change in order to

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Phospholipid Metabolism: Disease, Signal Transduction, and Membrane Biophysics
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Phospholipid Metabolism: Disease, Signal Transduction, & Membrane Dynamics.

University of Hawaii at Manoa graduate finds 'cool' gas may form and strengthen sunspots
Hydrogen molecules may act as a kind of energy sink that strengthens the magnetic grip that causes sunspots, according to scientists from Hawaii and New Mexico using a new infrared instrument on an old telescope.

U-M study urges parents to enforce booster seat use when carpooling
Most parents report that they typically require their child to use a life-saving booster seat, but more than 30 percent said they do not enforce this rule when their child is riding with another driver.

Research aims to improve effectiveness of radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer
A new three year research project aimed at improving the effectiveness of radiotherapy treatment for men affected by prostate cancer is taking place at Queen's.

Music training has biological impact on aging process
Age-related delays in neural timing are not inevitable and can be avoided or offset with musical training, according to the first study to provide biological evidence that lifelong musical experience impacts the aging process.

Construction starts on new marine research vessel
Construction of Australia's new $120 million Marine National Facility research vessel, Investigator has started in Singapore.

New appropriate use criteria reflect latest scientific data on restoring blood flow to heart
Updated appropriate use criteria released today offer detailed guidance on when to use an invasive procedure to improve blood flow to the heart and how to choose the best procedure for each patient.

Rice professor's nanotube theory confirmed
The Air Force Research Laboratory in Dayton, Ohio, has experimentally confirmed a theory by Rice University Professor Boris Yakobson that foretold a pair of interesting properties about nanotube growth: That the chirality of a nanotube controls the speed of its growth, and that armchair nanotubes should grow the fastest.

Jak of all trades? Not of leukaemia therapy!
Treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia usually relies on inhibitors of the abnormal protein that causes the condition but some patients do not respond to treatment and efforts are underway to develop a supplementary approach, targeting the so-called JAK2 kinase.

Children with burn injuries covering 60 percent or more of their total body surface area are at substantially higher risk of complications and death and need specialist burns unit care
New research published online first by the Lancet shows that children with burn injuries are much more likely to suffer severe complications or die when the burns cover 60 percent or more of their total body surface area.

Lungs infected with plague bacteria also become playgrounds for other microbes
Researchers led by William E. Goldman, Ph.D. of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine show that the plague bacteria transform the lungs from a nasty place for microbes into a playground for them to flourish.

Divorce hurts health more at earlier ages
Divorce at a younger age hurts people's health more than divorce later in life, according to a new study by a Michigan State University sociologist.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: New Frontiers in Transport Atpases: From Mechanistic to Therapeutic Concepts
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: New Frontiers in Transport ATPases: From Mechanistic to Therapeutic Concepts.

Bacteria provides clues to fight TB, says Rutgers-Camden researcher
A Rutgers-Camden professor is using his expertise in computer science to aid in the development of new methods to fight tuberculosis.

Mammals shrink at faster rates than they grow
Research published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows it took about 10 million generations for terrestrial mammals to hit their maximum mass: that's about the size of a cat evolving into the size of an elephant.

Biodiversity enhances ecosystems global drylands -- Ben-Gurion U researchers
Study indicates ability of ecosystems in drylands worldwide to maintain multiple functions, such as carbon storage and buildup of nutrient pools (multi-functionality) is enhanced by the number of perennial plant species, mainly shrubs and dwarf-shrubs, whereas increased average annual temperature reduces this ability.

New probiotic bacteria shows promise for use in shellfish aquaculture
The use of probiotic bacteria, isolated from naturally occurring bacterial communities, is gaining in popularity in the aquaculture industry as the preferred, environmentally friendly management alternative to the use of antibiotics and other antimicrobials for disease prevention.

FASEB SRC Announces Conference Registration Open for: Genome Engineering: Research & Applications
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Genome Engineering: Research & Applications.

What are your views on what happens to your genomic information?
An ethics team from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute today launches an online survey to capture the views of as many people as possible: they hope it will be the largest collection of opinions gathered to date.

Harnessing the predictive power of virtual communities
Scientists have created a new algorithm to detect virtual communities, designed to match the needs of real-life social, biological or information networks detection better than with current attempts.

Ferroelectric switching discovered for first time in soft biological tissue
The walls of the aorta, the largest blood vessel carrying blood from the heart, exhibits a response to electric fields known to exist in inorganic and synthetic materials.

DNDi and Abbott expand partnership to boost innovation for neglected tropical diseases
The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative and Abbott have signed a four-year joint research and non-exclusive licensing agreement to undertake research on new treatments for several of the world's most neglected tropical diseases, including Chagas disease, helminth infections, leishmaniasis and sleeping sickness.

Cancer patients' pain can be helped by psychosocial interventions, say researchers
Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center, who teamed with colleagues at five universities around the United States, analyzed past studies of cancer-related pain reduction and found that psychosocial interventions can have a beneficial effect on cancer patients' pain severity.

FASEB releases FY 2013 funding recommendations for science agencies
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology has released its annual report to Congress, Federal Funding for Biomedical & Related Life Sciences Research, FY 2013.

Dual use research: H5N1 influenza virus and beyond
The US National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity recently recommended that journals Nature and Science remove certain methodological details from controversial studies on H5N1 to minimize the risk of these findings being misused by would-be bioterrorists.

Improving medical treatment requires risk-based approach to regulate clinical trials
Current EU legislation represents a major hurdle to improving medical treatment due to the straight-jacket of EU legislation that the 2001 Clinical Trials Directive imposes, a group of leading European medical scientists charged today in a position paper issued in Brussels and Strasbourg.

ESC cardiologists 'intrigued'by novel approach to heart failure
The European Society of Cardiology welcomes an

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Smooth Muscle
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Smooth Muscle.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Skeletal Muscle Satellite and Stem Cells
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Skeletal Muscle Satellite and Stem Cells.

Inquests more likely for younger people and deaths from medical care complications
Coroners are more likely to hold inquests for deaths involving younger people or people who died of fatal complications from medical care, according to a study published in CMAJ.

Livestock, not Mongolian gazelles, drive foot-and-mouth disease outbreaks
Wildlife health experts from the Wildlife Conservation Society have published evidence which supports the conclusion that Mongolian gazelles -- one of the most populous large land mammals on the planet -- are not a reservoir of foot-and-mouth disease, a highly contagious viral disease that threatens both wildlife and livestock in Asia.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Molecular Biophysics of Membranes
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Molecular Biophysics of Membranes.

Opportunities and challenges of palliative care in the ICU discussed in expert roundtable
If you think palliative care and the ICU don't go together, think again.

More efforts needed to address motor vehicle deaths among American Indians and Alaska Natives
More research and programs are needed to address the elevated rate of motor vehicle-related deaths among American Indian and Alaska Native populations, according to new research from the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: The Lung Epithelium in Health and Disease
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: The Lung Epithelium in Health and Disease.

NASA scientists awarded distinctions as 2012 AGU elected Fellows
NASA scientists figure prominently in the distinguished group honored as Fellows of the American Geophysical Union in 2012.

Inherited risk factors for childhood leukemia are more common in Hispanic patients
Hispanic children are more likely than those from other racial and ethnic backgrounds to be diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and are more likely to die of their disease.

Scientists see 'sloshing' galaxy cluster
A Naval Research Laboratory scientist is part of a team that has recently discovered that vast clouds of hot gas are

Biological time-keeper linked to diabetes
Sleeping disorders have been known for some years to increase the risk of diabetes.

Study may answer longstanding questions about Little Ice Age
A new international study, with NCAR co-authors, suggests that the Little Ice Age was triggered by an unusual, 50-year episode of four massive volcanic eruptions.

Bioethics boot camp for reporters and editors
This is a one-day workshop to help journalists find must-read angles for science and medical stories.

Addicts' cravings have different roots in men and women
A new brain imaging study by Yale School of Medicine researchers suggests stress robustly activates areas of the brain associated with craving in cocaine-dependent women, while drug cues activate similar brain regions in cocaine-dependent men.

Alcohol and your heart: Friend or foe?
A meta-analysis done by the Center for Addiction and Mental Health into the relationship between alcohol consumption and heart disease provides new insight into the long-held belief that drinking a glass of red wine a day can help protect against heart disease.

MS drug prevented fatal heart condition in lab study
A drug used to treat multiple sclerosis may also be effective at preventing and reversing the leading cause of heart attack, a new study has found.

Mayo Clinic releases book with action plan to help beat heart disease
Based on an innovative yet simple

New method to manage stress responses for more successful tumor removal
Prof. Shamgar Ben-Eliyahu of Tel Aviv University is combining two medications originally used to treat excessive stress and inflammatory responses, the culmination of 15 years of research on the connection between the body's stress responses, immune functions, and tumor metastasis.

Barrett's patients who smoke are twice as likely to develop esophageal cancer
Barrett's esophagus patients who smoke tobacco are at a two-fold increased risk of developing esophageal cancer.

Surprise finding redraws 'map' of blood cell production
A study of the cells that respond to crises in the blood system has yielded a few surprises, redrawing the 'map' of how blood cells are made in the body.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Post-transcriptional Control of Gene Expression: Mechanisms of MRNA Decay
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Post-transcriptional Control of Gene Expression: Mechanisms of mRNA Decay.

Sandia's self-guided bullet prototype can hit target a mile away
Take two Sandia National Laboratories engineers who are hunters, get them talking about the sport and it shouldn't be surprising when the conversation leads to a patented design for a self-guided bullet that could help war fighters.

EARTH: Tracking plastic in the oceans
Humans produce over 260 million tons of plastic each year.

Finding the needle in the data haystack: The implications of a data-driven built environment
Within the green building industry, there is an increasing focus on policy, standards, and interoperability of building data.

Researchers rewrite textbook on location of brain's speech processing center
Scientists have long believed that human speech is processed towards the back of the brain's cerebral cortex, behind auditory cortex where all sounds are received -- a place famously known as Wernicke's area.

Early intervention may curb dangerous college drinking
The first few weeks of college are a critical time in shaping students' drinking habits.

MHIF publishes Riata Summit video archive
The Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation and Mayo Clinic posted video presentations from the Riata ICD Lead Summit.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Trace Elements in Biology & Medicine
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Trace Elements in Biology & Medicine.

Bright lights of purity
Berkeley Lab researchers have discovered why a promising technique for making quantum dots and nanorods has so far been a disappointment.

New CU-Boulder-led study may answer questions about enigmatic Little Ice Age
According to new University of Colorado Boulder-led study, the Little Ice Age began abruptly between A.D.

4-week vaccination regimen knocks out early breast cancer tumors, Penn researchers report
Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania report that a short course of vaccination with an anti-HER2 dendritic cell vaccine made partly from the patient's own cells triggers a complete tumor eradication in nearly 20 percent of women with ductal carcinoma in situ, an early breast cancer.

Oxygen molecule survives to enormously high pressures
Using computer simulations, a RUB researcher has shown that the oxygen molecule is stable up to pressures of 1.9 terapascal, which is about nineteen million times higher than atmosphere pressure.

Lumbar disc degeneration more likely in overweight and obese adults
One of the largest studies to investigate lumbar spine disc degeneration found that adults who are overweight or obese were significantly more likely to have disc degeneration than those with a normal body mass index.

Inquests more likely for younger people and deaths from medical care complications
Coroners are more likely to hold inquests for deaths involving younger people or people who died of fatal complications from medical care, according to a study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Liver Biology: Fundamental Mechanisms & Translational Applications
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Liver Biology: Fundamental Mechanisms & Translational Applications.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Ubiquitin and Cellular Regulation
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Ubiquitin & Cellular Regulation.

Carnegie Mellon scientist wins international award for computational biology
The International Society for Computational Biology has awarded its Overton Prize for outstanding accomplishment to Ziv Bar-Joseph, associate professor in Carnegie Mellon University's Lane Center for Computational Biology and Machine Learning Department.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Translational Neuroimmunology: From Mechanisms to Therapeutics
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Translational Neuroimmunology: From Mechanisms To Therapeutics.

Preserved habitat near national parks helps species conservation
National parks help preserve species native to a particular region, but it appears that some species preservation is more successful if a significant portion of land adjacent to a park also is left as natural habitat.

Defects in the packaging of DNA in malignant brain tumors
In children with glioblastoma, a particularly aggressive brain tumor, scientists have discovered mutations that affect the function of proteins known as histones.

Major electric utility buys US Solar Decathlon winner
WaterShed, the international-prize-winning solar house built by University of Maryland students, faculty and professional partners, has found a buyer and a permanent site: Electric service provider Pepco is purchasing the high-tech building.

High levels of burnout among UK family doctors, especially in group practice
Levels of burnout in UK general practice are high, suggests a study of general practitioners in one area of southeast England, published in BMJ Open.

Genetic breakthrough for brain cancer in children
An international research team led by the Research Institute of the MUHC in Montreal has made a major genetic breakthrough that could change the way pediatric cancers are treated in the future.
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