Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

March 25, 2012
Community-based prevention programs improve psychological, heart health
Intensive community-based lifestyle interventions tailored to individuals and focused on psychological health can significantly reduce multiple risk factors for heart disease in low-income and minority women, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session.

Nuclear power plants can produce hydrogen to fuel the 'hydrogen economy'
The long-sought technology for enabling the fabled

Antiplatelet drug reduces damage to heart muscle in heart attack patients
Researchers have found that the antiplatelet drug abciximab significantly decreased damage to the heart muscle in patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, the most severe type of heart attack.

A hidden architecture: Researchers use novel methods to uncover gene mutations for common diseases
Human geneticists have debated whether the genetic risk of the most common medical conditions derive from many rare mutations or common differences throughout the genome that modestly influence risk.

Minimally invasive treatment for ruptured aneurysm: Safe, reduces mortality
A burst aneurysm (a local area of bulge) in the abdominal aorta -- the largest blood vessel in the body -- is a deadly condition.

Some scum! Microbe in pond scum enlisted in new cancer test
Scientists are enlisting the living, self-propelled microbes found in pond scum -- the pea-green surface slicks that form on ponds -- in the development of a long-awaited new test to detect the cells that spread cancer through the bloodstream from the original tumor to new sites in the body.

Low LDL cholesterol is related to cancer risk
Low LDL cholesterol in patients with no history of taking cholesterol-lowering drugs predates cancer risk by decades, suggesting there may be some underlying mechanism affecting both cancer and low LDL cholesterol that requires further examination, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session.

The body's bacteria affect intestinal blood vessel formation
Researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have discovered a previously unknown mechanism which helps intestinal bacteria to affect the formation of blood vessels.

Incontinence 20 years after child birth 3 times more common after vaginal delivery
Women are nearly three times more likely to experience urinary incontinence for more than 10 years following a vaginal delivery rather than a caesarean section, finds new research at the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Compound in soy products may help lower blood pressure
Soy-based food products have taken grocery store shelves by storm, and the benefits of soy are steadily beginning to emerge.

Preserving arson evidence with triclosan
A preservative in toothpastes, hand soaps, underarm deodorants and other everyday products is getting a second life, helping crime scene investigators preserve evidence of arson, scientists reported here today at the 243rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

3-drug regimen equal to double-dose 2-drug approach in preventing clots after angioplasty
In a comparison of drugs to prevent blood clots after angioplasty, a three-drug regimen favored in Asia to increase anti-clotting effect was found to be as safe and effective as a double-dose two-drug treatment commonly used in high-risk patients in Western countries, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session.

Community hospitals can safely perform elective angioplasty
New evidence shows that with appropriate preparation, angioplasty can be safely and effectively performed at community hospitals without on-site cardiac surgery units, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session.

Large-scale, community-wide preventive initiative dramatically impacts CV risk profile
A population-wide community and clinical prevention program involving 10,000 adults meaningfully reduced the cardiovascular risk profile among a substantial portion of the population as indicated by those participating in screenings.

Weather records due to climate change: A game with loaded dice
The past decade has been one of unprecedented weather extremes.

Interventional radiologists see 'significant' symptom relief in MS patients
Researchers who investigated the connection between chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (a reported condition characterized as a blockage in the veins that drain blood from the brain and spinal cord and returns it to the heart) and multiple sclerosis indicate that a minimally invasive endovascular treatment for CCSVI, is safe and may produce

When targeting obesity in sixth-graders, gender matters
Intervention programs aimed at curbing obesity in adolescents may be more effective if they are gender-specific, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session.

Lower dosage CT-guided lung biopsy protocol maintains quality, minimizes exposure
New guidelines for CT-guided biopsies of lung nodules significantly reduce radiation exposure allowing individuals the benefit of the procedure, which may cut down on overall lung cancer deaths.

Snacking on raisins may offer a heart-healthy way to lower blood pressure
If you have slightly higher than normal blood pressure - known as prehypertension - consider eating a handful of raisins.

Medicare/Medicaid rule increases costs without improving patient outcomes for defibrillator implants
The cost to place an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator increased by $844 per case after a new requirement from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services went into effect in February 2010, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session.

Single molecules in a quantum movie
The quantum physics of massive particles has intrigued physicists for more than 80 years, since it predicts that even complex particles can exhibit wave-like behavior - in conflict with our everyday ideas of what is real or local.

Internet does not make young people abandon traditional media
Almost all 9- to 24-year-old Swedes use the internet. Most of them do so daily, and the older they are, the more they use it.

Materials inspired by Mother Nature: A 1-pound boat that could float 1,000 pounds
Combining the secrets that enable water striders to walk on water and give wood its lightness and strength yielded an amazing material so buoyant that, in everyday terms, a boat made from 1 pound of it could carry five kitchen refrigerators, about 1,000 pounds.

Interventional radiology: Potential breakthrough to treat men's enlarged prostate
A new interventional radiology treatment, prostatic artery embolization, may bring hope to men with debilitating symptoms caused by an enlarged prostate, say the group of researchers who pioneered its use.

A double ring ceremony prepares telomerase RNA to wed its protein partner
Few molecules are more interesting than DNA -- except of course RNA.

Some 90-year-old heart attack patients have 'excellent' outcomes with coronary stenting
Selected patients 90 years and older who experience an acute heart attack, or ST-elevation myocardial infarction, have reasonable outcomes with coronary stenting, and should be considered for reperfusion therapy, based on a scientific poster being presented at the 61st annual American College of Cardiology scientific session.

Diabetes associated with higher risk of cardiovascular problems in men
According to a new study by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), men with type 2 diabetes treated with insulin without a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) were at higher risk for major cardiovascular events (e.g., death, heart attack, stroke) compared with men who had a history of CVD.

Professor Jane Visvader elected to Australian Academy of Science
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute breast cancer researcher Professor Jane Visavader has been selected to become a fellow of the Australian Academy of Science.

New research can save tropical forests
Scientists from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have investigated how much carbon the natural forests of Sri Lanka contain.

Intervention results in increased use of evidence-based medications for patients with ACS
Among patients with acute coronary syndromes (such as heart attack or unstable angina) treated at public hospitals in Brazil, implementation of a multifaceted intervention that included educational materials, checklists and reminders resulted in improvement in the use of evidence-based medicines during the first 24 hours of hospitalization, according to a study appearing in JAMA.

Mouse lemur social interactions: Tell-tale lice
Small, shy nocturnal primates like Madagascarian mouse lemurs, Microcebus rufus, are hard to study.

Inner weapons against allergies: Gut bacteria control allergic diseases
Researchers have found that commensal bacteria in humans might play an important role in influencing and controlling allergic inflammation.

Using viruses to beat superbugs
Viruses that can target and destroy bacteria have the potential to be an effective strategy for tackling hard-to-treat bacterial infections.

J. Craig Venter, Ph.D., describes biofuels, vaccines and foods from made-to-order microbes
Just as authors often read numerous books before starting their own, scientists are using decades of knowledge from sequencing the genetic codes of thousands of living things to start writing new volumes in the library of life.

OB/GYN screening may help detect heart disease risk
Simple screening implemented in obstetrics and gynecology clinics may identify previously undetected heart disease risk among women and has the potential to greatly increase education about prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease in female patients, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session.

'Noodle gels' or 'spaghetti highways' could become tools of regenerative medicine
Medicine's recipe for keeping older people active and functioning in their homes and workplaces -- and healing younger people injured in catastrophic accidents -- may include

UCLA scientists identify novel pathway for T-cell activation in leprosy
UCLA scientists have pinpointed a new mechanism that potently activates T-cells to fight leprosy.

High blood sugar lowers chances of surviving a heart attack
Patients with high blood sugar run an increased risk of dying if they have a heart attack, and diabetics are less likely to survive in-hospital cardiac arrest than non-diabetics, reveals research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Scratching the surface of social interaction
It can be difficult to uncover the behavior of small, shy, nocturnal primates like the brown mouse lemur, especially in the dense rainforests of Madagascar where this lemur lives.

Dental plaque bacteria may trigger blood clots
Oral bacteria that escape into the bloodstream are able to cause blood clots and trigger life-threatening endocarditis.

Researchers discover first-ever link between tiny genetic structures, imminent heart attack risk
Researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute have, for the first time ever, made a connection between tiny genetic molecules called microRNAs and the imminent threat of a heart attack, according to a new study.

Paul Raeburn receives American Chemical Society's prestigious journalism award
Nationally renowned science journalist, author, broadcaster and blogger Paul Raeburn will receive the 2012 James T.

Heart healthy lessons plus better food offerings lower heart disease risk factors in sixth-graders
Sixth-graders taking part in a 10-week program that included interactive lessons to get heart smart coupled with healthier food and beverage options in the cafeteria and vending machines had marked reductions across all cardiovascular risk factors, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session.

Infusion of drug into the coronary artery may help reduce size of heart damage after heart attack
Administration of a bolus dose of the anticoagulant drug abciximab into the coronary artery involved in causing a certain type of heart attack among patients who were undergoing a percutaneous coronary intervention and also receiving another anticoagulant resulted in reduction in the size of damage to the heart muscle at 30 days, while a procedure that involved use of a catheter to remove the blood clot blocking that coronary artery did not produce these results, according to a study appearing in JAMA.

Interventional radiology: Mitigating symptoms, improving quality of life of MS patients
Researchers report that performing angioplasty (a treatment that involves temporarily inserting and blowing up a tiny balloon inside a clogged artery to help widen it) on veins in the neck and chest is safe -- and may be an effective way to treat the venous abnormalities found in those with multiple sclerosis and provide symptom relief.

Widespread CPR training saves lives
A nationwide effort in Denmark to increase the number of people trained in CPR led to an increase in bystander CPR and ultimately contributed to increased cardiac arrest survival rates in that country, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session.

Popcorn: the snack with even higher antioxidant levels than fruits and vegetables
Popcorn's reputation as a snack food that's actually good for health popped up a few notches today as scientists reported that it contains more of the healthful antioxidant substances called

The long, err, short of it
It is typical for telomeres to shorten as cells divide and chromosomes replicate over time.

Sleeping too much or too little can be bad for your heart
Getting too little sleep -- or even too much -- appears to spell trouble for the heart.

Simple strategies boost use of guidelines to treat chest pain
A three-pronged intervention in Brazilian public hospitals significantly improved physician adherence to evidence-based protocols for treating acute coronary syndrome - a type of disease causing chest pain from reduced blood flow to the heart, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session.

Vaccinating chickens could prevent food-borne illness
A vaccine could be developed to prevent Campylobacter being carried in chickens.

Cardiac pre-participation screenings too restrictive for black athletes
Many athletes undergo cardiac screening to detect possible heart conditions before being allowed to participate in student or professional sports.

Underweight patients face increased risks during defibrillator implantation
Patients who are underweight or small in stature are twice as likely to experience complications or die during insertion of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator compared to obese and normal-weight patients, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session.

American Chemical Society President unveils initiatives for 2012
Bassam Z. Shakhashiri, Ph.D., president of the American Chemical Society -- the world's largest scientific society -- today described initiatives on climate science, the education of future scientists and commemoration of a landmark federal law that engendered some of the nation's greatest universities at the ACS' 243rd National Meeting & Exposition.

Genetics of flu susceptibility
A genetic finding could help explain why influenza becomes a life-threatening disease to some people while it has only mild effects in others.

Platelet inhibitor reduces size of large heart attacks
The anti-platelet drug abciximab, delivered directly to lesions caused by a heart attack, significantly decreased damage to the heart muscle in high-risk patients while clot aspiration showed no impact, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session.

New 'massage method' quadruples protection against tooth decay
Do you really want to avoid cavities in your teeth?

Significant mismatch between PCI capable-hospitals and need
There is an imbalance between the rapid growth of cardiac catheterization laboratories, which provide percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures, relative to the growth in the overall US population, as well as patients who experience an acute heart attack, or ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), according to a study presented March 25 at the 61st annual American College of Cardiology (ACC) scientific session.

Diabetes drug can prevent heart disease
The widely used diabetes medicine metformin can have protective effects on the heart, reveals a new study conducted at the Sahlgrenska Academy, at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Pregnancy increases risk of heart attack
Heart attacks during pregnancy tend to be more severe, lead to more complications, and also occur for different reasons than commonly seen in the non-pregnant general population, suggesting that, in some cases, the standard approach to managing this condition may not always be best, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session.

The time is ripe for Salmonella
The ripeness of fruit could determine how food-poisoning bacteria grow on them, according to scientists presenting their work at the Society for General Microbiology's Spring Conference in Dublin this week.
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