Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

April 28, 2012
Radiologists play key role in successful bariatric procedures
With the increase of obesity in the last 50 years, bariatric surgeries are becoming a common solution for tackling this epidemic.

Study supports allowing family members in ED during critical care
Contrary to what many trauma teams believe, the presence of family members does not impede the care of injured children in the emergency department, according to a study to be presented Saturday, April 28, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in Boston.

New radiology exhibit: How to improve treatment for musculoskeletal ski/snowboard injuries
As skiing and snowboarding continue to be the most popular winter sports, they also carry a significant risk of injury.

Better health in adulthood starts with early prevention in childhood
Preventing chronic diseases and disorders that begin in infancy will improve the health of children and adults, according to research being presented on Saturday, April 28, 2012, at 10:30 am EST in a topic symposium at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in Room 302 at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston.

New standards for treating traumatic shoulder injuries improve patient care
Shoulder injuries are among the most frequently encountered musculoskeletal injuries treated in emergency departments.

Low-income moms under stress may overfeed infants
Efforts to prevent obesity among low-income infants should focus not only on what babies are being fed but also the reasons behind unhealthy feeding practices, according to a study to be presented Saturday, April 28, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in Boston.

Computers aid in collecting sensitive information from teens
More than one million youths ages 15-24 have sexually transmitted infections caused by Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhea.

Fear of not having enough food may lead to obesity
While eating too much food can cause obesity, the fear of not having enough food may lead to the same result, according to a study to be presented Saturday, April 28, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in Boston.

Parents' poor math skills may lead to medication errors
Many parents cringe when their child asks for help with math homework.

Racial differences found in care of children in ED
Black children are less likely than white children to receive medication for abdominal pain in the emergency department even when they report severe pain, according to a study to be presented Saturday, April 28, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in Boston.

Radiologists tackle legal challenges and policies for evaluating outside studies
As more patients are referred to tertiary care center with previous images, a new study from researchers at the Westchester Medical Center shows how radiologists are tackling the challenges of interpreting outside studies and reviewing discordance opinions.

Automated breast volume sonography improves screening and diagnosis of breast cancer for Asian women
A new study from researchers at the Bangkok Breast Center shows significant improvement in the detection of breast cancer in Asian women using automated breast volume sonography as compared to hand-held ultrasound.

Children neglected in clinical drug trials
Although children are more likely than adults to suffer from many diseases, few clinical trials are being conducted to test drugs in pediatric patients, according to a study to be presented Saturday, April 28, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in Boston.

Astronaut to discuss his experiences on International Space Station
NASA astronaut and mission specialist Gregory E. Chamitoff, Ph.D., will talk about his experiences on the space station and activities that contribute to NASA's goal of inspiring the next generation of scientists and engineers during his keynote address at the opening session of the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in Boston.

New imaging protocols help improve systemic functioning for living renal donors
A new study from UCLA shows how magnetic resonance angiography and computed tomography angiography are equivalent in delineating anatomy in living renal donors.

Record-breaking radio waves discovered from ultra-cool star
Penn State University astronomers using the world's largest radio telescope at Arecibo, Puerto Rico, have discovered flaring radio emissions from an ultra-cool star that is not much warmer than the planet Jupiter, shattering the previous record for the lowest temperature at which radio waves had been detected from a star.

New standards for treating traumatic shoulder injuries to improve patient care
Trainees in the Brigham and Women's Hospital Radiology Residency Program developed new protocols aimed at drawing ER radiologists' attention to the potential presence of secondary should injuries.
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